Blogs

May
18

Why Business and Charity Should Work Together

By admin

 Charity and business are often seen as incompatible or even opposed; after all business is full of hard headed investors with a bank account instead of a heart whereas Charities are full of bleeding heart liberals trying to help the needy! Well of course not, but this has led to a certain amount suspicion when charities and businesses work together. The classic objection being “oh it’s all a PR stunt”, this always seems to me to be a very short sighted view point. ...

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 Charity and business are often seen as incompatible or even opposed; after all business is full of hard headed investors with a bank account instead of a heart whereas Charities are full of bleeding heart liberals trying to help the needy! Well of course not, but this has led to a certain amount suspicion when charities and businesses work together. The classic objection being “oh it’s all a PR stunt”, this always seems to me to be a very short sighted view point. Yes a lot of companies give to improve their PR and that may not be the most noble of reasons, but it still means that a lot more money goes to charity. 

In addition there are several small charities that rely on small and local business to support them. This isn’t just for PR on the business’ side. Rather it is for a range of reasons, including personal ones. It is not just money that businesses give though. Many will offer space or training to charities, as well as giving staff time to volunteer. These options have a range of benefits from using empty space to improving charities effectiveness and staff morale. 

All of this is in addition to greater involvement with the local community. Of course this is Public Relations at its most basic, but it is also a positive experience both for the business and the charity. The business owner can get a better idea of his local area and have a chance to network within his community. The locals and the charity gain money, space and publicity as well as a chance to influence the business for the better.

Of course all charitable giving should be motivated by a desire to do good, but even if you cold hearted evil bastard, there are some good reasons for your company to give. Of course if your really generous you could set up a company to give! Not that we're biased at all. 

 

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 Charity and business are often seen as incompatible or even opposed; after all business is full of hard headed investors with a bank account instead of a heart whereas Charities are full of bleeding heart liberals trying to help the needy! Well of course not, but this has led to a certain amount suspicion when charities and businesses work together. The classic objection being “oh it’s all a PR stunt”, this always seems to me to be a very short sighted view point. [format] => filtered_html [safe_value] =>

 Charity and business are often seen as incompatible or even opposed; after all business is full of hard headed investors with a bank account instead of a heart whereas Charities are full of bleeding heart liberals trying to help the needy! Well of course not, but this has led to a certain amount suspicion when charities and businesses work together. The classic objection being “oh it’s all a PR stunt”, this always seems to me to be a very short sighted view point. Yes a lot of companies give to improve their PR and that may not be the most noble of reasons, but it still means that a lot more money goes to charity. 
In addition there are several small charities that rely on small and local business to support them. This isn’t just for PR on the business’ side. Rather it is for a range of reasons, including personal ones. It is not just money that businesses give though. Many will offer space or training to charities, as well as giving staff time to volunteer. These options have a range of benefits from using empty space to improving charities effectiveness and staff morale. 
All of this is in addition to greater involvement with the local community. Of course this is Public Relations at its most basic, but it is also a positive experience both for the business and the charity. The business owner can get a better idea of his local area and have a chance to network within his community. The locals and the charity gain money, space and publicity as well as a chance to influence the business for the better.
Of course all charitable giving should be motivated by a desire to do good, but even if you cold hearted evil bastard, there are some good reasons for your company to give. Of course if your really generous you could set up a company to give! Not that we're biased at all. 
 

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 Charity and business are often seen as incompatible or even opposed; after all business is full of hard headed investors with a bank account instead of a heart whereas Charities are full of bleeding heart liberals trying to help the needy! Well of course not, but this has led to a certain amount suspicion when charities and businesses work together. The classic objection being “oh it’s all a PR stunt”, this always seems to me to be a very short sighted view point. Yes a lot of companies give to improve their PR and that may not be the most noble of reasons, but it still means that a lot more money goes to charity. 

In addition there are several small charities that rely on small and local business to support them. This isn’t just for PR on the business’ side. Rather it is for a range of reasons, including personal ones. It is not just money that businesses give though. Many will offer space or training to charities, as well as giving staff time to volunteer. These options have a range of benefits from using empty space to improving charities effectiveness and staff morale. 

All of this is in addition to greater involvement with the local community. Of course this is Public Relations at its most basic, but it is also a positive experience both for the business and the charity. The business owner can get a better idea of his local area and have a chance to network within his community. The locals and the charity gain money, space and publicity as well as a chance to influence the business for the better.

Of course all charitable giving should be motivated by a desire to do good, but even if you cold hearted evil bastard, there are some good reasons for your company to give. Of course if your really generous you could set up a company to give! Not that we're biased at all. 

 

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 Charity and business are often seen as incompatible or even opposed; after all business is full of hard headed investors with a bank account instead of a heart whereas Charities are full of bleeding heart liberals trying to help the needy! Well of course not, but this has led to a certain amount suspicion when charities and businesses work together. The classic objection being “oh it’s all a PR stunt”, this always seems to me to be a very short sighted view point. [format] => filtered_html [safe_value] =>

 Charity and business are often seen as incompatible or even opposed; after all business is full of hard headed investors with a bank account instead of a heart whereas Charities are full of bleeding heart liberals trying to help the needy! Well of course not, but this has led to a certain amount suspicion when charities and businesses work together. The classic objection being “oh it’s all a PR stunt”, this always seems to me to be a very short sighted view point. Yes a lot of companies give to improve their PR and that may not be the most noble of reasons, but it still means that a lot more money goes to charity. 
In addition there are several small charities that rely on small and local business to support them. This isn’t just for PR on the business’ side. Rather it is for a range of reasons, including personal ones. It is not just money that businesses give though. Many will offer space or training to charities, as well as giving staff time to volunteer. These options have a range of benefits from using empty space to improving charities effectiveness and staff morale. 
All of this is in addition to greater involvement with the local community. Of course this is Public Relations at its most basic, but it is also a positive experience both for the business and the charity. The business owner can get a better idea of his local area and have a chance to network within his community. The locals and the charity gain money, space and publicity as well as a chance to influence the business for the better.
Of course all charitable giving should be motivated by a desire to do good, but even if you cold hearted evil bastard, there are some good reasons for your company to give. Of course if your really generous you could set up a company to give! Not that we're biased at all. 
 

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 Charity and business are often seen as incompatible or even opposed; after all business is full of hard headed investors with a bank account instead of a heart whereas Charities are full of bleeding heart liberals trying to help the needy! Well of course not, but this has led to a certain amount suspicion when charities and businesses work together. The classic objection being “oh it’s all a PR stunt”, this always seems to me to be a very short sighted view point.

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 Charity and business are often seen as incompatible or even opposed; after all business is full of hard headed investors with a bank account instead of a heart whereas Charities are full of bleeding heart liberals trying to help the needy! Well of course not, but this has led to a certain amount suspicion when charities and businesses work together. The classic objection being “oh it’s all a PR stunt”, this always seems to me to be a very short sighted view point.

) ) )
May
12

Chairman of the RNIB Calls for Charities to Become More Like Social Enterprises

By admin

 In a speech to the CFDG (Charity Finance Director’s Group) Kevin Carey called for charities to see themselves “more as product developers and less like campaigners.” Carey’s worry is that charities provide “gold plated services to a few” whilst failing to reach out to the larger community. ...

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 In a speech to the CFDG (Charity Finance Director’s Group) Kevin Carey called for charities to see themselves “more as product developers and less like campaigners.” Carey’s worry is that charities provide “gold plated services to a few” whilst failing to reach out to the larger community. He feels that that the current round of budget cutting offers an opportunity for the sector to demonstrate "independence, enterprise, excellence and impact", and "for the sake of those we exist to serve, we must not let the opportunity pass". 

Giveacar is pleased to see the recognition given to the social enterprise model. We have personally seen the effectiveness it can add to the charity sector. A business model can help improve efficiency and encourage innovation in a ways that a lot of charities don’t seem to be able to do as confidently.

Carey did aknowledge that there are a range of different roles and services filled by charities and many, such as campaigning charities, are not really appropriate for social enterprise. But his call for a change of attitude so that "Instead of seeing a problem and campaigning for somebody else to solve it, we need to solve it in parallel with a market analysis of how we can sell the solution." should give us all pause for thought. 

What do other people think? Would replacing some charities with social enterprises be benefical? Which areas would this work best in?

Hat tips Third Sector and Civil Society

 

[summary] =>

 In a speech to the CFDG (Charity Finance Director’s Group) Kevin Carey called for charities to see themselves “more as product developers and less like campaigners.” Carey’s worry is that charities provide “gold plated services to a few” whilst failing to reach out to the larger community. [format] => filtered_html [safe_value] =>

 In a speech to the CFDG (Charity Finance Director’s Group) Kevin Carey called for charities to see themselves “more as product developers and less like campaigners.” Carey’s worry is that charities provide “gold plated services to a few” whilst failing to reach out to the larger community. He feels that that the current round of budget cutting offers an opportunity for the sector to demonstrate "independence, enterprise, excellence and impact", and "for the sake of those we exist to serve, we must not let the opportunity pass". 
Giveacar is pleased to see the recognition given to the social enterprise model. We have personally seen the effectiveness it can add to the charity sector. A business model can help improve efficiency and encourage innovation in a ways that a lot of charities don’t seem to be able to do as confidently.
Carey did aknowledge that there are a range of different roles and services filled by charities and many, such as campaigning charities, are not really appropriate for social enterprise. But his call for a change of attitude so that "Instead of seeing a problem and campaigning for somebody else to solve it, we need to solve it in parallel with a market analysis of how we can sell the solution." should give us all pause for thought. 
What do other people think? Would replacing some charities with social enterprises be benefical? Which areas would this work best in?
Hat tips Third Sector and Civil Society
 

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 In a speech to the CFDG (Charity Finance Director’s Group) Kevin Carey called for charities to see themselves “more as product developers and less like campaigners.” Carey’s worry is that charities provide “gold plated services to a few” whilst failing to reach out to the larger community. He feels that that the current round of budget cutting offers an opportunity for the sector to demonstrate "independence, enterprise, excellence and impact", and "for the sake of those we exist to serve, we must not let the opportunity pass". 

Giveacar is pleased to see the recognition given to the social enterprise model. We have personally seen the effectiveness it can add to the charity sector. A business model can help improve efficiency and encourage innovation in a ways that a lot of charities don’t seem to be able to do as confidently.

Carey did aknowledge that there are a range of different roles and services filled by charities and many, such as campaigning charities, are not really appropriate for social enterprise. But his call for a change of attitude so that "Instead of seeing a problem and campaigning for somebody else to solve it, we need to solve it in parallel with a market analysis of how we can sell the solution." should give us all pause for thought. 

What do other people think? Would replacing some charities with social enterprises be benefical? Which areas would this work best in?

Hat tips Third Sector and Civil Society

 

[summary] =>

 In a speech to the CFDG (Charity Finance Director’s Group) Kevin Carey called for charities to see themselves “more as product developers and less like campaigners.” Carey’s worry is that charities provide “gold plated services to a few” whilst failing to reach out to the larger community. [format] => filtered_html [safe_value] =>

 In a speech to the CFDG (Charity Finance Director’s Group) Kevin Carey called for charities to see themselves “more as product developers and less like campaigners.” Carey’s worry is that charities provide “gold plated services to a few” whilst failing to reach out to the larger community. He feels that that the current round of budget cutting offers an opportunity for the sector to demonstrate "independence, enterprise, excellence and impact", and "for the sake of those we exist to serve, we must not let the opportunity pass". 
Giveacar is pleased to see the recognition given to the social enterprise model. We have personally seen the effectiveness it can add to the charity sector. A business model can help improve efficiency and encourage innovation in a ways that a lot of charities don’t seem to be able to do as confidently.
Carey did aknowledge that there are a range of different roles and services filled by charities and many, such as campaigning charities, are not really appropriate for social enterprise. But his call for a change of attitude so that "Instead of seeing a problem and campaigning for somebody else to solve it, we need to solve it in parallel with a market analysis of how we can sell the solution." should give us all pause for thought. 
What do other people think? Would replacing some charities with social enterprises be benefical? Which areas would this work best in?
Hat tips Third Sector and Civil Society
 

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) ) )
May
11

Do you like pies and pasties? Well they can now power your car!

By admin

Greenergy a UK company that produces biofuel has now started creating biodiesel from fuel waste. The fuel will come from unsold oily foods such as crisps, pies and pasties which will have fatty oils extracted and filtered.  ...

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Greenergy a UK company that produces biofuel has now started creating biodiesel from fuel waste. The fuel will come from unsold oily foods such as crisps, pies and pasties which will have fatty oils extracted and filtered. 

Whilst I originally though that this will help make the Giveacar team’s lunch time pasty a little less guilty, it turns out that only unsellable products will be processed. However the breakthrough with processing cooking oils increases the range of feedstock available for biofuel. It will also go a small way towards reducing criticism of biofuel for replacing food crops. 

At the moment the amount of biodiesel fuel from pie and chips is expected to be low, however as the technology improves and becomes more widespread we can probably expect the amount to steadily increase. 

It’s not just the oil that gets processed. The solid food leftover at the end is currently dried and composted. However Greenergy are looking into ways of converting it into solid fuel pellets and briquettes or ethanol. Giveacar is always happy to applaud green initiatives particularly ones which make cars greener, but ones which make cars and pies greener? Those we will give a standing ovation to!

 

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Greenergy a UK company that produces biofuel has now started creating biodiesel from fuel waste. The fuel will come from unsold oily foods such as crisps, pies and pasties which will have fatty oils extracted and filtered. 

[format] => filtered_html [safe_value] =>

Greenergy a UK company that produces biofuel has now started creating biodiesel from fuel waste. The fuel will come from unsold oily foods such as crisps, pies and pasties which will have fatty oils extracted and filtered. 
Whilst I originally though that this will help make the Giveacar team’s lunch time pasty a little less guilty, it turns out that only unsellable products will be processed. However the breakthrough with processing cooking oils increases the range of feedstock available for biofuel. It will also go a small way towards reducing criticism of biofuel for replacing food crops. 
At the moment the amount of biodiesel fuel from pie and chips is expected to be low, however as the technology improves and becomes more widespread we can probably expect the amount to steadily increase. 
It’s not just the oil that gets processed. The solid food leftover at the end is currently dried and composted. However Greenergy are looking into ways of converting it into solid fuel pellets and briquettes or ethanol. Giveacar is always happy to applaud green initiatives particularly ones which make cars greener, but ones which make cars and pies greener? Those we will give a standing ovation to!
 

[safe_summary] =>

Greenergy a UK company that produces biofuel has now started creating biodiesel from fuel waste. The fuel will come from unsold oily foods such as crisps, pies and pasties which will have fatty oils extracted and filtered. 

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Greenergy a UK company that produces biofuel has now started creating biodiesel from fuel waste. The fuel will come from unsold oily foods such as crisps, pies and pasties which will have fatty oils extracted and filtered. 

Whilst I originally though that this will help make the Giveacar team’s lunch time pasty a little less guilty, it turns out that only unsellable products will be processed. However the breakthrough with processing cooking oils increases the range of feedstock available for biofuel. It will also go a small way towards reducing criticism of biofuel for replacing food crops. 

At the moment the amount of biodiesel fuel from pie and chips is expected to be low, however as the technology improves and becomes more widespread we can probably expect the amount to steadily increase. 

It’s not just the oil that gets processed. The solid food leftover at the end is currently dried and composted. However Greenergy are looking into ways of converting it into solid fuel pellets and briquettes or ethanol. Giveacar is always happy to applaud green initiatives particularly ones which make cars greener, but ones which make cars and pies greener? Those we will give a standing ovation to!

 

[summary] =>

Greenergy a UK company that produces biofuel has now started creating biodiesel from fuel waste. The fuel will come from unsold oily foods such as crisps, pies and pasties which will have fatty oils extracted and filtered. 

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Greenergy a UK company that produces biofuel has now started creating biodiesel from fuel waste. The fuel will come from unsold oily foods such as crisps, pies and pasties which will have fatty oils extracted and filtered. 
Whilst I originally though that this will help make the Giveacar team’s lunch time pasty a little less guilty, it turns out that only unsellable products will be processed. However the breakthrough with processing cooking oils increases the range of feedstock available for biofuel. It will also go a small way towards reducing criticism of biofuel for replacing food crops. 
At the moment the amount of biodiesel fuel from pie and chips is expected to be low, however as the technology improves and becomes more widespread we can probably expect the amount to steadily increase. 
It’s not just the oil that gets processed. The solid food leftover at the end is currently dried and composted. However Greenergy are looking into ways of converting it into solid fuel pellets and briquettes or ethanol. Giveacar is always happy to applaud green initiatives particularly ones which make cars greener, but ones which make cars and pies greener? Those we will give a standing ovation to!
 

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Greenergy a UK company that produces biofuel has now started creating biodiesel from fuel waste. The fuel will come from unsold oily foods such as crisps, pies and pasties which will have fatty oils extracted and filtered. 

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Greenergy a UK company that produces biofuel has now started creating biodiesel from fuel waste. The fuel will come from unsold oily foods such as crisps, pies and pasties which will have fatty oils extracted and filtered. 

) ) )
May
3

International Development Journalism Competition

By admin

Any aspiring journalists out there may be interested to know that The Guardian has launched its annual International Development Journalism Competition. Sponsored by eight NGO’s as well as Barclays and Glaxo Smith Kline the competition invites competitors to write a feature between 650 and 1000 words on one of the 16 provided themes surrounding global poverty. ...

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Any aspiring journalists out there may be interested to know that The Guardian has launched its annual International Development Journalism Competition. Sponsored by eight NGO’s as well as Barclays and Glaxo Smith Kline the competition invites competitors to write a feature between 650 and 1000 words on one of the 16 provided themes surrounding global poverty.

This is the fourth year that the competition has been running. Amongst its aims is to increase awareness of global development issues. Because these projects are long running and tend to feature a range of complicated issues they are less attractive than other charity projects to the media. Though both the Guardian and The Telegraph feature regular annual appeals for specific projects.

However these projects are vital for combating poverty and disease, in contrast to disaster relief for example these long term projects seek to get the communities that they work with on their own feet, and able to sustain themselves. For example projects working to empower women have been proven to provide long term and radical improvements within the communities that they work in.

Of course these competitions provide benefits to the writers as well. By providing a chance to write for a major newspaper they offer an opportunity to add to your portfolio and showcase your skills. Of course if writing’s not your thing then you could always enter our photography competition!   

[summary] =>

Any aspiring journalists out there may be interested to know that The Guardian has launched its annual International Development Journalism Competition. Sponsored by eight NGO’s as well as Barclays and Glaxo Smith Kline the competition invites competitors to write a feature between 650 and 1000 words on one of the 16 provided themes surrounding global poverty.

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Any aspiring journalists out there may be interested to know that The Guardian has launched its annual International Development Journalism Competition. Sponsored by eight NGO’s as well as Barclays and Glaxo Smith Kline the competition invites competitors to write a feature between 650 and 1000 words on one of the 16 provided themes surrounding global poverty.

This is the fourth year that the competition has been running. Amongst its aims is to increase awareness of global development issues. Because these projects are long running and tend to feature a range of complicated issues they are less attractive than other charity projects to the media. Though both the Guardian and The Telegraph feature regular annual appeals for specific projects.
However these projects are vital for combating poverty and disease, in contrast to disaster relief for example these long term projects seek to get the communities that they work with on their own feet, and able to sustain themselves. For example projects working to empower women have been proven to provide long term and radical improvements within the communities that they work in.
Of course these competitions provide benefits to the writers as well. By providing a chance to write for a major newspaper they offer an opportunity to add to your portfolio and showcase your skills. Of course if writing’s not your thing then you could always enter our photography competition!   

[safe_summary] =>

Any aspiring journalists out there may be interested to know that The Guardian has launched its annual International Development Journalism Competition. Sponsored by eight NGO’s as well as Barclays and Glaxo Smith Kline the competition invites competitors to write a feature between 650 and 1000 words on one of the 16 provided themes surrounding global poverty.

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Any aspiring journalists out there may be interested to know that The Guardian has launched its annual International Development Journalism Competition. Sponsored by eight NGO’s as well as Barclays and Glaxo Smith Kline the competition invites competitors to write a feature between 650 and 1000 words on one of the 16 provided themes surrounding global poverty.

This is the fourth year that the competition has been running. Amongst its aims is to increase awareness of global development issues. Because these projects are long running and tend to feature a range of complicated issues they are less attractive than other charity projects to the media. Though both the Guardian and The Telegraph feature regular annual appeals for specific projects.

However these projects are vital for combating poverty and disease, in contrast to disaster relief for example these long term projects seek to get the communities that they work with on their own feet, and able to sustain themselves. For example projects working to empower women have been proven to provide long term and radical improvements within the communities that they work in.

Of course these competitions provide benefits to the writers as well. By providing a chance to write for a major newspaper they offer an opportunity to add to your portfolio and showcase your skills. Of course if writing’s not your thing then you could always enter our photography competition!   

[summary] =>

Any aspiring journalists out there may be interested to know that The Guardian has launched its annual International Development Journalism Competition. Sponsored by eight NGO’s as well as Barclays and Glaxo Smith Kline the competition invites competitors to write a feature between 650 and 1000 words on one of the 16 provided themes surrounding global poverty.

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Any aspiring journalists out there may be interested to know that The Guardian has launched its annual International Development Journalism Competition. Sponsored by eight NGO’s as well as Barclays and Glaxo Smith Kline the competition invites competitors to write a feature between 650 and 1000 words on one of the 16 provided themes surrounding global poverty.

This is the fourth year that the competition has been running. Amongst its aims is to increase awareness of global development issues. Because these projects are long running and tend to feature a range of complicated issues they are less attractive than other charity projects to the media. Though both the Guardian and The Telegraph feature regular annual appeals for specific projects.
However these projects are vital for combating poverty and disease, in contrast to disaster relief for example these long term projects seek to get the communities that they work with on their own feet, and able to sustain themselves. For example projects working to empower women have been proven to provide long term and radical improvements within the communities that they work in.
Of course these competitions provide benefits to the writers as well. By providing a chance to write for a major newspaper they offer an opportunity to add to your portfolio and showcase your skills. Of course if writing’s not your thing then you could always enter our photography competition!   

[safe_summary] =>

Any aspiring journalists out there may be interested to know that The Guardian has launched its annual International Development Journalism Competition. Sponsored by eight NGO’s as well as Barclays and Glaxo Smith Kline the competition invites competitors to write a feature between 650 and 1000 words on one of the 16 provided themes surrounding global poverty.

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Any aspiring journalists out there may be interested to know that The Guardian has launched its annual International Development Journalism Competition. Sponsored by eight NGO’s as well as Barclays and Glaxo Smith Kline the competition invites competitors to write a feature between 650 and 1000 words on one of the 16 provided themes surrounding global poverty.

) ) )
Apr
28

Royal Charity

By admin

With the Royal Wedding coming up tomorrow, the Giveacar team thought we’d like to extend our best wishes to the happy couple. In fact we’ve had special covers put over our chairs in case Jack bursts! But it’s not just on wedding days that the Royals spend time and money on charitable endeavours. In fact there are over 3000 organisations which benefit from the Royal Patronage. ...

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With the Royal Wedding coming up tomorrow, the Giveacar team thought we’d like to extend our best wishes to the happy couple. In fact we’ve had special covers put over our chairs in case Jack bursts! But it’s not just on wedding days that the Royals spend time and money on charitable endeavours. In fact there are over 3000 organisations which benefit from the Royal Patronage.

These charities cover a huge range of causes , from supporting service men and women to health and environmental charities.

Perhaps the most famous Royal charity is the Prince’s Trust, which helps young people from 14 to 30 who need a better start in life get the skills and confidence they need for the workplace. Founded by Prince Charles in 1976 this charity takes on 100 young people a day to help set them up. This one of 18 charities set up by the Prince.

And of course there is also The Prince William & Miss Catherine Middleton Charitable Gift Fund which works with The Foundation of Prince William and Prince Harry. These funds will distribute the money donated to the chosen charities according to need, as well as providing some significant PR for them. By acting in these roles the Royals are able to encourage other people to participate in fundraising and volunteering.

Of course if they really want to help then they could always donate wedding carriage!

[summary] =>

With the Royal Wedding coming up tomorrow, the Giveacar team thought we’d like to extend our best wishes to the happy couple. In fact we’ve had special covers put over our chairs in case Jack bursts! But it’s not just on wedding days that the Royals spend time and money on charitable endeavours. In fact there are over 3000 organisations which benefit from the Royal Patronage.

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With the Royal Wedding coming up tomorrow, the Giveacar team thought we’d like to extend our best wishes to the happy couple. In fact we’ve had special covers put over our chairs in case Jack bursts! But it’s not just on wedding days that the Royals spend time and money on charitable endeavours. In fact there are over 3000 organisations which benefit from the Royal Patronage.

These charities cover a huge range of causes , from supporting service men and women to health and environmental charities.
Perhaps the most famous Royal charity is the Prince’s Trust, which helps young people from 14 to 30 who need a better start in life get the skills and confidence they need for the workplace. Founded by Prince Charles in 1976 this charity takes on 100 young people a day to help set them up. This one of 18 charities set up by the Prince.
And of course there is also The Prince William & Miss Catherine Middleton Charitable Gift Fund which works with The Foundation of Prince William and Prince Harry. These funds will distribute the money donated to the chosen charities according to need, as well as providing some significant PR for them. By acting in these roles the Royals are able to encourage other people to participate in fundraising and volunteering.
Of course if they really want to help then they could always donate wedding carriage!

[safe_summary] =>

With the Royal Wedding coming up tomorrow, the Giveacar team thought we’d like to extend our best wishes to the happy couple. In fact we’ve had special covers put over our chairs in case Jack bursts! But it’s not just on wedding days that the Royals spend time and money on charitable endeavours. In fact there are over 3000 organisations which benefit from the Royal Patronage.

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With the Royal Wedding coming up tomorrow, the Giveacar team thought we’d like to extend our best wishes to the happy couple. In fact we’ve had special covers put over our chairs in case Jack bursts! But it’s not just on wedding days that the Royals spend time and money on charitable endeavours. In fact there are over 3000 organisations which benefit from the Royal Patronage.

These charities cover a huge range of causes , from supporting service men and women to health and environmental charities.

Perhaps the most famous Royal charity is the Prince’s Trust, which helps young people from 14 to 30 who need a better start in life get the skills and confidence they need for the workplace. Founded by Prince Charles in 1976 this charity takes on 100 young people a day to help set them up. This one of 18 charities set up by the Prince.

And of course there is also The Prince William & Miss Catherine Middleton Charitable Gift Fund which works with The Foundation of Prince William and Prince Harry. These funds will distribute the money donated to the chosen charities according to need, as well as providing some significant PR for them. By acting in these roles the Royals are able to encourage other people to participate in fundraising and volunteering.

Of course if they really want to help then they could always donate wedding carriage!

[summary] =>

With the Royal Wedding coming up tomorrow, the Giveacar team thought we’d like to extend our best wishes to the happy couple. In fact we’ve had special covers put over our chairs in case Jack bursts! But it’s not just on wedding days that the Royals spend time and money on charitable endeavours. In fact there are over 3000 organisations which benefit from the Royal Patronage.

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With the Royal Wedding coming up tomorrow, the Giveacar team thought we’d like to extend our best wishes to the happy couple. In fact we’ve had special covers put over our chairs in case Jack bursts! But it’s not just on wedding days that the Royals spend time and money on charitable endeavours. In fact there are over 3000 organisations which benefit from the Royal Patronage.

These charities cover a huge range of causes , from supporting service men and women to health and environmental charities.
Perhaps the most famous Royal charity is the Prince’s Trust, which helps young people from 14 to 30 who need a better start in life get the skills and confidence they need for the workplace. Founded by Prince Charles in 1976 this charity takes on 100 young people a day to help set them up. This one of 18 charities set up by the Prince.
And of course there is also The Prince William & Miss Catherine Middleton Charitable Gift Fund which works with The Foundation of Prince William and Prince Harry. These funds will distribute the money donated to the chosen charities according to need, as well as providing some significant PR for them. By acting in these roles the Royals are able to encourage other people to participate in fundraising and volunteering.
Of course if they really want to help then they could always donate wedding carriage!

[safe_summary] =>

With the Royal Wedding coming up tomorrow, the Giveacar team thought we’d like to extend our best wishes to the happy couple. In fact we’ve had special covers put over our chairs in case Jack bursts! But it’s not just on wedding days that the Royals spend time and money on charitable endeavours. In fact there are over 3000 organisations which benefit from the Royal Patronage.

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With the Royal Wedding coming up tomorrow, the Giveacar team thought we’d like to extend our best wishes to the happy couple. In fact we’ve had special covers put over our chairs in case Jack bursts! But it’s not just on wedding days that the Royals spend time and money on charitable endeavours. In fact there are over 3000 organisations which benefit from the Royal Patronage.

) ) )
Apr
20

Street Fundraisers Face Restrictions in 16 Towns and Cities

By admin

 You probably see them at least once a week if not more often. Clipboard in hand, desperately overenthusiastic in their branded anoraks Chuggers are one of the perils of the modern high street. Even members of our amazingly charitable team at Giveacar have been known to adopt a grim stare and a cold shoulder when they approach. Of all the public faces of charity street fundraisers are amongst the most prolific and least popular. ...

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 You probably see them at least once a week if not more often. Clipboard in hand, desperately overenthusiastic in their branded anoraks Chuggers are one of the perils of the modern high street. Even members of our amazingly charitable team at Giveacar have been known to adopt a grim stare and a cold shoulder when they approach. Of all the public faces of charity street fundraisers are amongst the most prolific and least popular.

So the news that their activities are likely to become more restricted within 16 more local authorities following negotiations with the Public Fundraising Regulatory Association (PFRA) will probably be welcomed as good news by all but the most tolerant. This is in addition to 40 where there are already restrictions including Manchester, Leeds and Sheffield.

Street fundraising may be unpopular, but it is also effective. In fact some smaller charities rely on it for much of their fundraising and brand awareness. In addition with the average return for charities being roughly three times what they pay for the activity, largely due to the large number of long term donors, this unpopularity is unlikely to act as much of deterrent.

While it would be great if less combative forms of fundraising were to take a larger role in getting donors, it is unfortunately hard to see how this can be the case. In fact whilst we love getting repeat donors here at Giveacar, we can’t really expect many people to donate a car every year! Though if you want to that would be great. However with any luck the new agreements will help to reduce the perception of chuggers as harassing people and discourage those who are seen as harassing the public.

via Third Sector

[summary] =>

 You probably see them at least once a week if not more often. Clipboard in hand, desperately overenthusiastic in their branded anoraks Chuggers are one of the perils of the modern high street. Even members of our amazingly charitable team at Giveacar have been known to adopt a grim stare and a cold shoulder when they approach. Of all the public faces of charity street fundraisers are amongst the most prolific and least popular.

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 You probably see them at least once a week if not more often. Clipboard in hand, desperately overenthusiastic in their branded anoraks Chuggers are one of the perils of the modern high street. Even members of our amazingly charitable team at Giveacar have been known to adopt a grim stare and a cold shoulder when they approach. Of all the public faces of charity street fundraisers are amongst the most prolific and least popular.

So the news that their activities are likely to become more restricted within 16 more local authorities following negotiations with the Public Fundraising Regulatory Association (PFRA) will probably be welcomed as good news by all but the most tolerant. This is in addition to 40 where there are already restrictions including Manchester, Leeds and Sheffield.
Street fundraising may be unpopular, but it is also effective. In fact some smaller charities rely on it for much of their fundraising and brand awareness. In addition with the average return for charities being roughly three times what they pay for the activity, largely due to the large number of long term donors, this unpopularity is unlikely to act as much of deterrent.
While it would be great if less combative forms of fundraising were to take a larger role in getting donors, it is unfortunately hard to see how this can be the case. In fact whilst we love getting repeat donors here at Giveacar, we can’t really expect many people to donate a car every year! Though if you want to that would be great. However with any luck the new agreements will help to reduce the perception of chuggers as harassing people and discourage those who are seen as harassing the public.
via Third Sector

[safe_summary] =>

 You probably see them at least once a week if not more often. Clipboard in hand, desperately overenthusiastic in their branded anoraks Chuggers are one of the perils of the modern high street. Even members of our amazingly charitable team at Giveacar have been known to adopt a grim stare and a cold shoulder when they approach. Of all the public faces of charity street fundraisers are amongst the most prolific and least popular.

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 You probably see them at least once a week if not more often. Clipboard in hand, desperately overenthusiastic in their branded anoraks Chuggers are one of the perils of the modern high street. Even members of our amazingly charitable team at Giveacar have been known to adopt a grim stare and a cold shoulder when they approach. Of all the public faces of charity street fundraisers are amongst the most prolific and least popular.

So the news that their activities are likely to become more restricted within 16 more local authorities following negotiations with the Public Fundraising Regulatory Association (PFRA) will probably be welcomed as good news by all but the most tolerant. This is in addition to 40 where there are already restrictions including Manchester, Leeds and Sheffield.

Street fundraising may be unpopular, but it is also effective. In fact some smaller charities rely on it for much of their fundraising and brand awareness. In addition with the average return for charities being roughly three times what they pay for the activity, largely due to the large number of long term donors, this unpopularity is unlikely to act as much of deterrent.

While it would be great if less combative forms of fundraising were to take a larger role in getting donors, it is unfortunately hard to see how this can be the case. In fact whilst we love getting repeat donors here at Giveacar, we can’t really expect many people to donate a car every year! Though if you want to that would be great. However with any luck the new agreements will help to reduce the perception of chuggers as harassing people and discourage those who are seen as harassing the public.

via Third Sector

[summary] =>

 You probably see them at least once a week if not more often. Clipboard in hand, desperately overenthusiastic in their branded anoraks Chuggers are one of the perils of the modern high street. Even members of our amazingly charitable team at Giveacar have been known to adopt a grim stare and a cold shoulder when they approach. Of all the public faces of charity street fundraisers are amongst the most prolific and least popular.

[format] => filtered_html [safe_value] =>

 You probably see them at least once a week if not more often. Clipboard in hand, desperately overenthusiastic in their branded anoraks Chuggers are one of the perils of the modern high street. Even members of our amazingly charitable team at Giveacar have been known to adopt a grim stare and a cold shoulder when they approach. Of all the public faces of charity street fundraisers are amongst the most prolific and least popular.

So the news that their activities are likely to become more restricted within 16 more local authorities following negotiations with the Public Fundraising Regulatory Association (PFRA) will probably be welcomed as good news by all but the most tolerant. This is in addition to 40 where there are already restrictions including Manchester, Leeds and Sheffield.
Street fundraising may be unpopular, but it is also effective. In fact some smaller charities rely on it for much of their fundraising and brand awareness. In addition with the average return for charities being roughly three times what they pay for the activity, largely due to the large number of long term donors, this unpopularity is unlikely to act as much of deterrent.
While it would be great if less combative forms of fundraising were to take a larger role in getting donors, it is unfortunately hard to see how this can be the case. In fact whilst we love getting repeat donors here at Giveacar, we can’t really expect many people to donate a car every year! Though if you want to that would be great. However with any luck the new agreements will help to reduce the perception of chuggers as harassing people and discourage those who are seen as harassing the public.
via Third Sector

[safe_summary] =>

 You probably see them at least once a week if not more often. Clipboard in hand, desperately overenthusiastic in their branded anoraks Chuggers are one of the perils of the modern high street. Even members of our amazingly charitable team at Giveacar have been known to adopt a grim stare and a cold shoulder when they approach. Of all the public faces of charity street fundraisers are amongst the most prolific and least popular.

) ) [#formatter] => text_summary_or_trimmed [0] => Array ( [#markup] =>

 You probably see them at least once a week if not more often. Clipboard in hand, desperately overenthusiastic in their branded anoraks Chuggers are one of the perils of the modern high street. Even members of our amazingly charitable team at Giveacar have been known to adopt a grim stare and a cold shoulder when they approach. Of all the public faces of charity street fundraisers are amongst the most prolific and least popular.

) ) )
Apr
19

How London's Olympic Legacy may help Giveacar

By admin

As I begin writing this article there is exactly 465 days, 8 hours, 2 minutes and 46 seconds until the London 2012 Olympic Games officially begins. It’s been six years since London were awarded the Games, with Seb Coe’s vision for a long-term legacy widely acknowledged to be the key factor which squeezed out the Parisian bid and brought ‘The Greatest Show on Earth’ to London’s East End. ...

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As I begin writing this article there is exactly 465 days, 8 hours, 2 minutes and 46 seconds until the London 2012 Olympic Games officially begins. It’s been six years since London were awarded the Games, with Seb Coe’s vision for a long-term legacy widely acknowledged to be the key factor which squeezed out the Parisian bid and brought ‘The Greatest Show on Earth’ to London’s East End.

So what exactly is London’s Olympic legacy, a ‘white elephant’ project designed to bring tourists to the East End? Not quite, we’re told that the Olympic Games will inspire a generation of young people, making the UK a world leading sporting nation. So can we assume that the Olympics will provide the inspiration for the British public to finally put on their running shoes and reject motorised transport? Maybe ‘The Stig’ will take to the Top Gear test track in Team GBs track bike, or maybe Wayne Rooney will set fire to his fleet of supercars, instead beginning each morning with a ‘Rocky’-esque run through the streets of Manchester, culminating with a victory celebration upon the steps of the Arndale Centre?

Ok, so maybe that is a bit far-fetched, but maybe the Olympics will at least inspire the British people to live a more active life which should result in people gradually using less and less of their cars. If people do begin to use less of their car, maybe by walking or cycling to work, then eventually they will view their vehicle as obsolete which can only be good news for Giveacar and Britain’s charities. 

Let’s just hope then that Seb Coe and Britain’s Olympic team actually deliver on their legacy goal, but if inspiration is what you’re looking for to kick-start your active life then don’t wait 465 days, just whack on your track-suit, select ‘Eye of the Tiger’ and hit play on you iPod, then take to pavement like you were Rocky himself. 

 

[summary] =>

As I begin writing this article there is exactly 465 days, 8 hours, 2 minutes and 46 seconds until the London 2012 Olympic Games officially begins. It’s been six years since London were awarded the Games, with Seb Coe’s vision for a long-term legacy widely acknowledged to be the key factor which squeezed out the Parisian bid and brought ‘The Greatest Show on Earth’ to London’s East End.

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As I begin writing this article there is exactly 465 days, 8 hours, 2 minutes and 46 seconds until the London 2012 Olympic Games officially begins. It’s been six years since London were awarded the Games, with Seb Coe’s vision for a long-term legacy widely acknowledged to be the key factor which squeezed out the Parisian bid and brought ‘The Greatest Show on Earth’ to London’s East End.
So what exactly is London’s Olympic legacy, a ‘white elephant’ project designed to bring tourists to the East End? Not quite, we’re told that the Olympic Games will inspire a generation of young people, making the UK a world leading sporting nation. So can we assume that the Olympics will provide the inspiration for the British public to finally put on their running shoes and reject motorised transport? Maybe ‘The Stig’ will take to the Top Gear test track in Team GBs track bike, or maybe Wayne Rooney will set fire to his fleet of supercars, instead beginning each morning with a ‘Rocky’-esque run through the streets of Manchester, culminating with a victory celebration upon the steps of the Arndale Centre?
Ok, so maybe that is a bit far-fetched, but maybe the Olympics will at least inspire the British people to live a more active life which should result in people gradually using less and less of their cars. If people do begin to use less of their car, maybe by walking or cycling to work, then eventually they will view their vehicle as obsolete which can only be good news for Giveacar and Britain’s charities. 
Let’s just hope then that Seb Coe and Britain’s Olympic team actually deliver on their legacy goal, but if inspiration is what you’re looking for to kick-start your active life then don’t wait 465 days, just whack on your track-suit, select ‘Eye of the Tiger’ and hit play on you iPod, then take to pavement like you were Rocky himself. 
 

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As I begin writing this article there is exactly 465 days, 8 hours, 2 minutes and 46 seconds until the London 2012 Olympic Games officially begins. It’s been six years since London were awarded the Games, with Seb Coe’s vision for a long-term legacy widely acknowledged to be the key factor which squeezed out the Parisian bid and brought ‘The Greatest Show on Earth’ to London’s East End.

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As I begin writing this article there is exactly 465 days, 8 hours, 2 minutes and 46 seconds until the London 2012 Olympic Games officially begins. It’s been six years since London were awarded the Games, with Seb Coe’s vision for a long-term legacy widely acknowledged to be the key factor which squeezed out the Parisian bid and brought ‘The Greatest Show on Earth’ to London’s East End.

So what exactly is London’s Olympic legacy, a ‘white elephant’ project designed to bring tourists to the East End? Not quite, we’re told that the Olympic Games will inspire a generation of young people, making the UK a world leading sporting nation. So can we assume that the Olympics will provide the inspiration for the British public to finally put on their running shoes and reject motorised transport? Maybe ‘The Stig’ will take to the Top Gear test track in Team GBs track bike, or maybe Wayne Rooney will set fire to his fleet of supercars, instead beginning each morning with a ‘Rocky’-esque run through the streets of Manchester, culminating with a victory celebration upon the steps of the Arndale Centre?

Ok, so maybe that is a bit far-fetched, but maybe the Olympics will at least inspire the British people to live a more active life which should result in people gradually using less and less of their cars. If people do begin to use less of their car, maybe by walking or cycling to work, then eventually they will view their vehicle as obsolete which can only be good news for Giveacar and Britain’s charities. 

Let’s just hope then that Seb Coe and Britain’s Olympic team actually deliver on their legacy goal, but if inspiration is what you’re looking for to kick-start your active life then don’t wait 465 days, just whack on your track-suit, select ‘Eye of the Tiger’ and hit play on you iPod, then take to pavement like you were Rocky himself. 

 

[summary] =>

As I begin writing this article there is exactly 465 days, 8 hours, 2 minutes and 46 seconds until the London 2012 Olympic Games officially begins. It’s been six years since London were awarded the Games, with Seb Coe’s vision for a long-term legacy widely acknowledged to be the key factor which squeezed out the Parisian bid and brought ‘The Greatest Show on Earth’ to London’s East End.

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As I begin writing this article there is exactly 465 days, 8 hours, 2 minutes and 46 seconds until the London 2012 Olympic Games officially begins. It’s been six years since London were awarded the Games, with Seb Coe’s vision for a long-term legacy widely acknowledged to be the key factor which squeezed out the Parisian bid and brought ‘The Greatest Show on Earth’ to London’s East End.
So what exactly is London’s Olympic legacy, a ‘white elephant’ project designed to bring tourists to the East End? Not quite, we’re told that the Olympic Games will inspire a generation of young people, making the UK a world leading sporting nation. So can we assume that the Olympics will provide the inspiration for the British public to finally put on their running shoes and reject motorised transport? Maybe ‘The Stig’ will take to the Top Gear test track in Team GBs track bike, or maybe Wayne Rooney will set fire to his fleet of supercars, instead beginning each morning with a ‘Rocky’-esque run through the streets of Manchester, culminating with a victory celebration upon the steps of the Arndale Centre?
Ok, so maybe that is a bit far-fetched, but maybe the Olympics will at least inspire the British people to live a more active life which should result in people gradually using less and less of their cars. If people do begin to use less of their car, maybe by walking or cycling to work, then eventually they will view their vehicle as obsolete which can only be good news for Giveacar and Britain’s charities. 
Let’s just hope then that Seb Coe and Britain’s Olympic team actually deliver on their legacy goal, but if inspiration is what you’re looking for to kick-start your active life then don’t wait 465 days, just whack on your track-suit, select ‘Eye of the Tiger’ and hit play on you iPod, then take to pavement like you were Rocky himself. 
 

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As I begin writing this article there is exactly 465 days, 8 hours, 2 minutes and 46 seconds until the London 2012 Olympic Games officially begins. It’s been six years since London were awarded the Games, with Seb Coe’s vision for a long-term legacy widely acknowledged to be the key factor which squeezed out the Parisian bid and brought ‘The Greatest Show on Earth’ to London’s East End.

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As I begin writing this article there is exactly 465 days, 8 hours, 2 minutes and 46 seconds until the London 2012 Olympic Games officially begins. It’s been six years since London were awarded the Games, with Seb Coe’s vision for a long-term legacy widely acknowledged to be the key factor which squeezed out the Parisian bid and brought ‘The Greatest Show on Earth’ to London’s East End.

) ) )
Apr
14

The Royal Wedding wants your gifts to go to charity

By admin

If you’re anything like me, I’m sure you’re so excited about the royal wedding that there is a serious danger that you might physically burst. But apparently our dreams of sending them wedding gifts have been scuppered when they requested that we instead give the money to charity. ...

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If you’re anything like me, I’m sure you’re so excited about the royal wedding that there is a serious danger that you might physically burst. But apparently our dreams of sending them wedding gifts have been scuppered when they requested that we instead give the money to charity.

A representative said “Having been touched by the goodwill shown them since the announcement of their engagement, Prince William and Miss Middleton have asked that anyone who might wish to give them a wedding gift consider giving instead to a charitable fund.” Presumably while digging Kate out from under a pile of avalanched toasters. 

“Many of the charities are little known, without existing royal patronage, and undertake excellent work within specific communities. They are charities that have a particular resonance with Prince William and Miss Middleton and reflect issues in which the couple have been particularly interested in their lives to date.” 

There is now a website for their charity wedding fund in which you can pick and choose which charity to donate to, including the Youth Association, Earthwatch, BeatBullying and Dance United. Overall there are around twenty charities supported on Kate and Charlies suggestion.

Of course, if none of those charities take your fancy you could just pick a charity and send the money yourself. If you have an old car you need taken off your hands we could turn that into a donation for you… but you already knew that.

It’s nice of them to do something for charity, but there’s no way it lives up to the glory of Knitting your own royal wedding! 

 

 

[summary] =>

If you’re anything like me, I’m sure you’re so excited about the royal wedding that there is a serious danger that you might physically burst. But apparently our dreams of sending them wedding gifts have been scuppered when they requested that we instead give the money to charity.

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If you’re anything like me, I’m sure you’re so excited about the royal wedding that there is a serious danger that you might physically burst. But apparently our dreams of sending them wedding gifts have been scuppered when they requested that we instead give the money to charity.
A representative said “Having been touched by the goodwill shown them since the announcement of their engagement, Prince William and Miss Middleton have asked that anyone who might wish to give them a wedding gift consider giving instead to a charitable fund.” Presumably while digging Kate out from under a pile of avalanched toasters. 
“Many of the charities are little known, without existing royal patronage, and undertake excellent work within specific communities. They are charities that have a particular resonance with Prince William and Miss Middleton and reflect issues in which the couple have been particularly interested in their lives to date.” 
There is now a website for their charity wedding fund in which you can pick and choose which charity to donate to, including the Youth Association, Earthwatch, BeatBullying and Dance United. Overall there are around twenty charities supported on Kate and Charlies suggestion.
Of course, if none of those charities take your fancy you could just pick a charity and send the money yourself. If you have an old car you need taken off your hands we could turn that into a donation for you… but you already knew that.
It’s nice of them to do something for charity, but there’s no way it lives up to the glory of Knitting your own royal wedding! 
 
 

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If you’re anything like me, I’m sure you’re so excited about the royal wedding that there is a serious danger that you might physically burst. But apparently our dreams of sending them wedding gifts have been scuppered when they requested that we instead give the money to charity.

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If you’re anything like me, I’m sure you’re so excited about the royal wedding that there is a serious danger that you might physically burst. But apparently our dreams of sending them wedding gifts have been scuppered when they requested that we instead give the money to charity.

A representative said “Having been touched by the goodwill shown them since the announcement of their engagement, Prince William and Miss Middleton have asked that anyone who might wish to give them a wedding gift consider giving instead to a charitable fund.” Presumably while digging Kate out from under a pile of avalanched toasters. 

“Many of the charities are little known, without existing royal patronage, and undertake excellent work within specific communities. They are charities that have a particular resonance with Prince William and Miss Middleton and reflect issues in which the couple have been particularly interested in their lives to date.” 

There is now a website for their charity wedding fund in which you can pick and choose which charity to donate to, including the Youth Association, Earthwatch, BeatBullying and Dance United. Overall there are around twenty charities supported on Kate and Charlies suggestion.

Of course, if none of those charities take your fancy you could just pick a charity and send the money yourself. If you have an old car you need taken off your hands we could turn that into a donation for you… but you already knew that.

It’s nice of them to do something for charity, but there’s no way it lives up to the glory of Knitting your own royal wedding! 

 

 

[summary] =>

If you’re anything like me, I’m sure you’re so excited about the royal wedding that there is a serious danger that you might physically burst. But apparently our dreams of sending them wedding gifts have been scuppered when they requested that we instead give the money to charity.

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If you’re anything like me, I’m sure you’re so excited about the royal wedding that there is a serious danger that you might physically burst. But apparently our dreams of sending them wedding gifts have been scuppered when they requested that we instead give the money to charity.
A representative said “Having been touched by the goodwill shown them since the announcement of their engagement, Prince William and Miss Middleton have asked that anyone who might wish to give them a wedding gift consider giving instead to a charitable fund.” Presumably while digging Kate out from under a pile of avalanched toasters. 
“Many of the charities are little known, without existing royal patronage, and undertake excellent work within specific communities. They are charities that have a particular resonance with Prince William and Miss Middleton and reflect issues in which the couple have been particularly interested in their lives to date.” 
There is now a website for their charity wedding fund in which you can pick and choose which charity to donate to, including the Youth Association, Earthwatch, BeatBullying and Dance United. Overall there are around twenty charities supported on Kate and Charlies suggestion.
Of course, if none of those charities take your fancy you could just pick a charity and send the money yourself. If you have an old car you need taken off your hands we could turn that into a donation for you… but you already knew that.
It’s nice of them to do something for charity, but there’s no way it lives up to the glory of Knitting your own royal wedding! 
 
 

[safe_summary] =>

If you’re anything like me, I’m sure you’re so excited about the royal wedding that there is a serious danger that you might physically burst. But apparently our dreams of sending them wedding gifts have been scuppered when they requested that we instead give the money to charity.

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If you’re anything like me, I’m sure you’re so excited about the royal wedding that there is a serious danger that you might physically burst. But apparently our dreams of sending them wedding gifts have been scuppered when they requested that we instead give the money to charity.

) ) )
Apr
13

The Most Stolen Car of 2010

By admin

Throughout its years the Range Rover has received many plaudits for its innovative yet stylish designs. Well, guess what, Range Rover’s gone and done it again and now have a shiny new plaque to hang on its wall of fame - ‘The most stolen car of 2010’. ...

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Throughout its years the Range Rover has received many plaudits for its innovative yet stylish designs. Well, guess what, Range Rover’s gone and done it again and now have a shiny new plaque to hang on its wall of fame - ‘The most stolen car of 2010’.

Whilst not the most desirable award to receive, I imagine Range Rover’s security techs are in for a ‘dressing down’, it seems that the UK’s ‘carjacking fraternity have taken a particularly liking to the Range Rover, maybe it‘s the roomy interior and pleasant driving experience of the SUV which is the big attraction. I doubt that, the more likely reason is its’ significant yet affordable sell on value which makes Range Rover the ‘Mona Lisa’ of the carjacking industry. 

In the UK, 230,000 cars are stolen each year; many are left abandoned or set ablaze by drunken teenage joyriders, with local Police acting as the collection service for these stolen vehicles. With so many stolen cars left unfit to drive or unrecovered by its owners, this begs the question, what if the Police decided to hand these cars over to Giveacar? 

With such a significant amount of extra cars made available for scrappage, Giveacar could raise a large amount of much need money for charities throughout the UK. In theory this would create a situation whereby criminal activity is directly funding UK Charities, but is this necessarily a bad thing, surely there’s nothing wrong with turning a negative into a positive. 

It’s been reported recently that Liverpool striker Andy Carroll has had his chrome plated Range Rover set on fire by any irate individual; I wonder how much money that would raise if it was scrapped?

 

[summary] =>

Throughout its years the Range Rover has received many plaudits for its innovative yet stylish designs. Well, guess what, Range Rover’s gone and done it again and now have a shiny new plaque to hang on its wall of fame - ‘The most stolen car of 2010’.

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Throughout its years the Range Rover has received many plaudits for its innovative yet stylish designs. Well, guess what, Range Rover’s gone and done it again and now have a shiny new plaque to hang on its wall of fame - ‘The most stolen car of 2010’.
Whilst not the most desirable award to receive, I imagine Range Rover’s security techs are in for a ‘dressing down’, it seems that the UK’s ‘carjacking fraternity have taken a particularly liking to the Range Rover, maybe it‘s the roomy interior and pleasant driving experience of the SUV which is the big attraction. I doubt that, the more likely reason is its’ significant yet affordable sell on value which makes Range Rover the ‘Mona Lisa’ of the carjacking industry. 
In the UK, 230,000 cars are stolen each year; many are left abandoned or set ablaze by drunken teenage joyriders, with local Police acting as the collection service for these stolen vehicles. With so many stolen cars left unfit to drive or unrecovered by its owners, this begs the question, what if the Police decided to hand these cars over to Giveacar? 
With such a significant amount of extra cars made available for scrappage, Giveacar could raise a large amount of much need money for charities throughout the UK. In theory this would create a situation whereby criminal activity is directly funding UK Charities, but is this necessarily a bad thing, surely there’s nothing wrong with turning a negative into a positive. 
It’s been reported recently that Liverpool striker Andy Carroll has had his chrome plated Range Rover set on fire by any irate individual; I wonder how much money that would raise if it was scrapped?
 

[safe_summary] =>

Throughout its years the Range Rover has received many plaudits for its innovative yet stylish designs. Well, guess what, Range Rover’s gone and done it again and now have a shiny new plaque to hang on its wall of fame - ‘The most stolen car of 2010’.

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Throughout its years the Range Rover has received many plaudits for its innovative yet stylish designs. Well, guess what, Range Rover’s gone and done it again and now have a shiny new plaque to hang on its wall of fame - ‘The most stolen car of 2010’.

Whilst not the most desirable award to receive, I imagine Range Rover’s security techs are in for a ‘dressing down’, it seems that the UK’s ‘carjacking fraternity have taken a particularly liking to the Range Rover, maybe it‘s the roomy interior and pleasant driving experience of the SUV which is the big attraction. I doubt that, the more likely reason is its’ significant yet affordable sell on value which makes Range Rover the ‘Mona Lisa’ of the carjacking industry. 

In the UK, 230,000 cars are stolen each year; many are left abandoned or set ablaze by drunken teenage joyriders, with local Police acting as the collection service for these stolen vehicles. With so many stolen cars left unfit to drive or unrecovered by its owners, this begs the question, what if the Police decided to hand these cars over to Giveacar? 

With such a significant amount of extra cars made available for scrappage, Giveacar could raise a large amount of much need money for charities throughout the UK. In theory this would create a situation whereby criminal activity is directly funding UK Charities, but is this necessarily a bad thing, surely there’s nothing wrong with turning a negative into a positive. 

It’s been reported recently that Liverpool striker Andy Carroll has had his chrome plated Range Rover set on fire by any irate individual; I wonder how much money that would raise if it was scrapped?

 

[summary] =>

Throughout its years the Range Rover has received many plaudits for its innovative yet stylish designs. Well, guess what, Range Rover’s gone and done it again and now have a shiny new plaque to hang on its wall of fame - ‘The most stolen car of 2010’.

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Throughout its years the Range Rover has received many plaudits for its innovative yet stylish designs. Well, guess what, Range Rover’s gone and done it again and now have a shiny new plaque to hang on its wall of fame - ‘The most stolen car of 2010’.
Whilst not the most desirable award to receive, I imagine Range Rover’s security techs are in for a ‘dressing down’, it seems that the UK’s ‘carjacking fraternity have taken a particularly liking to the Range Rover, maybe it‘s the roomy interior and pleasant driving experience of the SUV which is the big attraction. I doubt that, the more likely reason is its’ significant yet affordable sell on value which makes Range Rover the ‘Mona Lisa’ of the carjacking industry. 
In the UK, 230,000 cars are stolen each year; many are left abandoned or set ablaze by drunken teenage joyriders, with local Police acting as the collection service for these stolen vehicles. With so many stolen cars left unfit to drive or unrecovered by its owners, this begs the question, what if the Police decided to hand these cars over to Giveacar? 
With such a significant amount of extra cars made available for scrappage, Giveacar could raise a large amount of much need money for charities throughout the UK. In theory this would create a situation whereby criminal activity is directly funding UK Charities, but is this necessarily a bad thing, surely there’s nothing wrong with turning a negative into a positive. 
It’s been reported recently that Liverpool striker Andy Carroll has had his chrome plated Range Rover set on fire by any irate individual; I wonder how much money that would raise if it was scrapped?
 

[safe_summary] =>

Throughout its years the Range Rover has received many plaudits for its innovative yet stylish designs. Well, guess what, Range Rover’s gone and done it again and now have a shiny new plaque to hang on its wall of fame - ‘The most stolen car of 2010’.

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Throughout its years the Range Rover has received many plaudits for its innovative yet stylish designs. Well, guess what, Range Rover’s gone and done it again and now have a shiny new plaque to hang on its wall of fame - ‘The most stolen car of 2010’.

) ) )
Apr
12

How could a jet-powered car be good for the environment?

By admin

 Last year, Jaguar celebrated their 75th birthday by unveiling their new ‘environmentally friendly’ concept car, I usually have a cake and candles, but what do I know? The Jaguar C-X75 is driven by four electric motors, one on each wheel, and dispenses with the tired old internal combustion engine we’ve only been using for the last hundred years by charging the batteries with a pair of gas turbine engines.  ...

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 Last year, Jaguar celebrated their 75th birthday by unveiling their new ‘environmentally friendly’ concept car, I usually have a cake and candles, but what do I know?

The Jaguar C-X75 is driven by four electric motors, one on each wheel, and dispenses with the tired old internal combustion engine we’ve only been using for the last hundred years by charging the batteries with a pair of gas turbine engines. 

That’s right; the kind of engines that Jet Fighters run on is now being put into a sports car. The batteries can be charged on the mains and will get you 70 miles worth of juice on their own, but when they get low the turbines spin up and recharge the batteries while you drive, if you find yourself involved in a glamorous car chase the turbines can power the motors directly, which can get the car up to hit a top speed of 207 Miles an hour.

Despite the fact this car was obviously designed by someone who’s been watching too many Batman cartoons, has some hilariously silly design choices like having two jet engines behind your head inside the car (I hope you have short hair!) and an exhaust that melts the cars behind it, this is actually good news for the environment.

Just as Formula 1 has driven innovations in car safety by pushing cars to their logical extremes on a track, this car will push hybrid technology further along the saner end of the market by showing off just how insane it can truly get.

Driving a car along with electric motors is actually very easy, it’s powering them that’s a problem when batteries don’t last as long as a tank of petrol. This car shows that going back to the drawing board and rebuilding the petrol motors for spinning a generator rather than the drive-shaft can come up with some incredible results if you put your mind to it.

But most importantly for us... we’ll get loads of scrap cars when this thing fries anything unfortunate enough to get behind it!

 

[summary] =>

 Last year, Jaguar celebrated their 75th birthday by unveiling their new ‘environmentally friendly’ concept car, I usually have a cake and candles, but what do I know?

The Jaguar C-X75 is driven by four electric motors, one on each wheel, and dispenses with the tired old internal combustion engine we’ve only been using for the last hundred years by charging the batteries with a pair of gas turbine engines. 

[format] => filtered_html [safe_value] =>

 Last year, Jaguar celebrated their 75th birthday by unveiling their new ‘environmentally friendly’ concept car, I usually have a cake and candles, but what do I know?
The Jaguar C-X75 is driven by four electric motors, one on each wheel, and dispenses with the tired old internal combustion engine we’ve only been using for the last hundred years by charging the batteries with a pair of gas turbine engines. 
That’s right; the kind of engines that Jet Fighters run on is now being put into a sports car. The batteries can be charged on the mains and will get you 70 miles worth of juice on their own, but when they get low the turbines spin up and recharge the batteries while you drive, if you find yourself involved in a glamorous car chase the turbines can power the motors directly, which can get the car up to hit a top speed of 207 Miles an hour.
Despite the fact this car was obviously designed by someone who’s been watching too many Batman cartoons, has some hilariously silly design choices like having two jet engines behind your head inside the car (I hope you have short hair!) and an exhaust that melts the cars behind it, this is actually good news for the environment.
Just as Formula 1 has driven innovations in car safety by pushing cars to their logical extremes on a track, this car will push hybrid technology further along the saner end of the market by showing off just how insane it can truly get.
Driving a car along with electric motors is actually very easy, it’s powering them that’s a problem when batteries don’t last as long as a tank of petrol. This car shows that going back to the drawing board and rebuilding the petrol motors for spinning a generator rather than the drive-shaft can come up with some incredible results if you put your mind to it.
But most importantly for us... we’ll get loads of scrap cars when this thing fries anything unfortunate enough to get behind it!
 

[safe_summary] =>

 Last year, Jaguar celebrated their 75th birthday by unveiling their new ‘environmentally friendly’ concept car, I usually have a cake and candles, but what do I know?
The Jaguar C-X75 is driven by four electric motors, one on each wheel, and dispenses with the tired old internal combustion engine we’ve only been using for the last hundred years by charging the batteries with a pair of gas turbine engines. 

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 Last year, Jaguar celebrated their 75th birthday by unveiling their new ‘environmentally friendly’ concept car, I usually have a cake and candles, but what do I know?

The Jaguar C-X75 is driven by four electric motors, one on each wheel, and dispenses with the tired old internal combustion engine we’ve only been using for the last hundred years by charging the batteries with a pair of gas turbine engines. 

That’s right; the kind of engines that Jet Fighters run on is now being put into a sports car. The batteries can be charged on the mains and will get you 70 miles worth of juice on their own, but when they get low the turbines spin up and recharge the batteries while you drive, if you find yourself involved in a glamorous car chase the turbines can power the motors directly, which can get the car up to hit a top speed of 207 Miles an hour.

Despite the fact this car was obviously designed by someone who’s been watching too many Batman cartoons, has some hilariously silly design choices like having two jet engines behind your head inside the car (I hope you have short hair!) and an exhaust that melts the cars behind it, this is actually good news for the environment.

Just as Formula 1 has driven innovations in car safety by pushing cars to their logical extremes on a track, this car will push hybrid technology further along the saner end of the market by showing off just how insane it can truly get.

Driving a car along with electric motors is actually very easy, it’s powering them that’s a problem when batteries don’t last as long as a tank of petrol. This car shows that going back to the drawing board and rebuilding the petrol motors for spinning a generator rather than the drive-shaft can come up with some incredible results if you put your mind to it.

But most importantly for us... we’ll get loads of scrap cars when this thing fries anything unfortunate enough to get behind it!

 

[summary] =>

 Last year, Jaguar celebrated their 75th birthday by unveiling their new ‘environmentally friendly’ concept car, I usually have a cake and candles, but what do I know?

The Jaguar C-X75 is driven by four electric motors, one on each wheel, and dispenses with the tired old internal combustion engine we’ve only been using for the last hundred years by charging the batteries with a pair of gas turbine engines. 

[format] => filtered_html [safe_value] =>

 Last year, Jaguar celebrated their 75th birthday by unveiling their new ‘environmentally friendly’ concept car, I usually have a cake and candles, but what do I know?
The Jaguar C-X75 is driven by four electric motors, one on each wheel, and dispenses with the tired old internal combustion engine we’ve only been using for the last hundred years by charging the batteries with a pair of gas turbine engines. 
That’s right; the kind of engines that Jet Fighters run on is now being put into a sports car. The batteries can be charged on the mains and will get you 70 miles worth of juice on their own, but when they get low the turbines spin up and recharge the batteries while you drive, if you find yourself involved in a glamorous car chase the turbines can power the motors directly, which can get the car up to hit a top speed of 207 Miles an hour.
Despite the fact this car was obviously designed by someone who’s been watching too many Batman cartoons, has some hilariously silly design choices like having two jet engines behind your head inside the car (I hope you have short hair!) and an exhaust that melts the cars behind it, this is actually good news for the environment.
Just as Formula 1 has driven innovations in car safety by pushing cars to their logical extremes on a track, this car will push hybrid technology further along the saner end of the market by showing off just how insane it can truly get.
Driving a car along with electric motors is actually very easy, it’s powering them that’s a problem when batteries don’t last as long as a tank of petrol. This car shows that going back to the drawing board and rebuilding the petrol motors for spinning a generator rather than the drive-shaft can come up with some incredible results if you put your mind to it.
But most importantly for us... we’ll get loads of scrap cars when this thing fries anything unfortunate enough to get behind it!
 

[safe_summary] =>

 Last year, Jaguar celebrated their 75th birthday by unveiling their new ‘environmentally friendly’ concept car, I usually have a cake and candles, but what do I know?
The Jaguar C-X75 is driven by four electric motors, one on each wheel, and dispenses with the tired old internal combustion engine we’ve only been using for the last hundred years by charging the batteries with a pair of gas turbine engines. 

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 Last year, Jaguar celebrated their 75th birthday by unveiling their new ‘environmentally friendly’ concept car, I usually have a cake and candles, but what do I know?
The Jaguar C-X75 is driven by four electric motors, one on each wheel, and dispenses with the tired old internal combustion engine we’ve only been using for the last hundred years by charging the batteries with a pair of gas turbine engines. 

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