Blogs

Dec
5

Giveacar Limerick Competition

By admin

Win 5000 customizable flyers for your charity ...

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Hello charity partner!

It’s time for Giveacar’s latest amazing competition and this time we would like you to come up with a… wait for it… car donation limerick! Oh yes, we have really outdone ourselves this time. To enter just email your offering over to us!


Why on Earth would I do this?

To win a prize of 5000 customised flyers paid for by yours truly to help you get a few more cars this Season! We’ll put you in touch with our design guys and you’ll have the flyers designed to your specifications and delivered to your office. Bonus points if you can fit in the name of your charity or even Giveacar. How do flyers help? Have a look and see.


Rules:

We’ll keep it simple for you – the first two lines of the limerick must rhyme with each other and the last line. Limericks are normally five lines long, and the third and fourth line rhyme with each other as well. Here's our hastily put-together example:


I woke one morning with a sigh,

My beloved old car had decided to die,

No need to fret,

For the safest bet,

Was to put in a call to those Giveacar guys!


The rhym-ier the better, we’ll rank each submission based on:

a) How well it rhymes

b) Whether you’ve got tricky words relating to Giveacar, car donation and your charity in

c) Whether the structure is correct

d) If it’s amusing, beautiful, thought-provoking or just plan nonsensical!


So get those heads together and win lots of nice shiny new marketing material for your charity! The competition opens on the 5th December and closes on 19th December. The winning entry will be decided and announced on the 20th.


Terms: Open to Giveacar registered charities only. Final decision on winning limerick is made by the Giveacar office. The winning entry will be posted on our social media, with details of the charity and person who submitted it. We may publish entries via social media before the closing date. The final design on the personalised flyers must be approved by Giveacar before being sent to print and must relate to promoting the Giveacar service. Design and printing is taken care of through Giveacar’s design contact. [summary] => Win 5000 customizable flyers for your charity [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>

Hello charity partner!

It’s time for Giveacar’s latest amazing competition and this time we would like you to come up with a… wait for it… car donation limerick! Oh yes, we have really outdone ourselves this time. To enter just email your offering over to us!



Why on Earth would I do this?

To win a prize of 5000 customised flyers paid for by yours truly to help you get a few more cars this Season! We’ll put you in touch with our design guys and you’ll have the flyers designed to your specifications and delivered to your office. Bonus points if you can fit in the name of your charity or even Giveacar. How do flyers help? Have a look and see.



Rules:

We’ll keep it simple for you – the first two lines of the limerick must rhyme with each other and the last line. Limericks are normally five lines long, and the third and fourth line rhyme with each other as well. Here's our hastily put-together example:


I woke one morning with a sigh,

My beloved old car had decided to die,

No need to fret,

For the safest bet,

Was to put in a call to those Giveacar guys!


The rhym-ier the better, we’ll rank each submission based on:

a) How well it rhymes

b) Whether you’ve got tricky words relating to Giveacar, car donation and your charity in

c) Whether the structure is correct

d) If it’s amusing, beautiful, thought-provoking or just plan nonsensical!


So get those heads together and win lots of nice shiny new marketing material for your charity! The competition opens on the 5th December and closes on 19th December. The winning entry will be decided and announced on the 20th.



Terms: Open to Giveacar registered charities only. Final decision on winning limerick is made by the Giveacar office. The winning entry will be posted on our social media, with details of the charity and person who submitted it. We may publish entries via social media before the closing date. The final design on the personalised flyers must be approved by Giveacar before being sent to print and must relate to promoting the Giveacar service. Design and printing is taken care of through Giveacar’s design contact.

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Hello charity partner!

It’s time for Giveacar’s latest amazing competition and this time we would like you to come up with a… wait for it… car donation limerick! Oh yes, we have really outdone ourselves this time. To enter just email your offering over to us!


Why on Earth would I do this?

To win a prize of 5000 customised flyers paid for by yours truly to help you get a few more cars this Season! We’ll put you in touch with our design guys and you’ll have the flyers designed to your specifications and delivered to your office. Bonus points if you can fit in the name of your charity or even Giveacar. How do flyers help? Have a look and see.


Rules:

We’ll keep it simple for you – the first two lines of the limerick must rhyme with each other and the last line. Limericks are normally five lines long, and the third and fourth line rhyme with each other as well. Here's our hastily put-together example:


I woke one morning with a sigh,

My beloved old car had decided to die,

No need to fret,

For the safest bet,

Was to put in a call to those Giveacar guys!


The rhym-ier the better, we’ll rank each submission based on:

a) How well it rhymes

b) Whether you’ve got tricky words relating to Giveacar, car donation and your charity in

c) Whether the structure is correct

d) If it’s amusing, beautiful, thought-provoking or just plan nonsensical!


So get those heads together and win lots of nice shiny new marketing material for your charity! The competition opens on the 5th December and closes on 19th December. The winning entry will be decided and announced on the 20th.


Terms: Open to Giveacar registered charities only. Final decision on winning limerick is made by the Giveacar office. The winning entry will be posted on our social media, with details of the charity and person who submitted it. We may publish entries via social media before the closing date. The final design on the personalised flyers must be approved by Giveacar before being sent to print and must relate to promoting the Giveacar service. Design and printing is taken care of through Giveacar’s design contact. [summary] => Win 5000 customizable flyers for your charity [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>

Hello charity partner!

It’s time for Giveacar’s latest amazing competition and this time we would like you to come up with a… wait for it… car donation limerick! Oh yes, we have really outdone ourselves this time. To enter just email your offering over to us!



Why on Earth would I do this?

To win a prize of 5000 customised flyers paid for by yours truly to help you get a few more cars this Season! We’ll put you in touch with our design guys and you’ll have the flyers designed to your specifications and delivered to your office. Bonus points if you can fit in the name of your charity or even Giveacar. How do flyers help? Have a look and see.



Rules:

We’ll keep it simple for you – the first two lines of the limerick must rhyme with each other and the last line. Limericks are normally five lines long, and the third and fourth line rhyme with each other as well. Here's our hastily put-together example:


I woke one morning with a sigh,

My beloved old car had decided to die,

No need to fret,

For the safest bet,

Was to put in a call to those Giveacar guys!


The rhym-ier the better, we’ll rank each submission based on:

a) How well it rhymes

b) Whether you’ve got tricky words relating to Giveacar, car donation and your charity in

c) Whether the structure is correct

d) If it’s amusing, beautiful, thought-provoking or just plan nonsensical!


So get those heads together and win lots of nice shiny new marketing material for your charity! The competition opens on the 5th December and closes on 19th December. The winning entry will be decided and announced on the 20th.



Terms: Open to Giveacar registered charities only. Final decision on winning limerick is made by the Giveacar office. The winning entry will be posted on our social media, with details of the charity and person who submitted it. We may publish entries via social media before the closing date. The final design on the personalised flyers must be approved by Giveacar before being sent to print and must relate to promoting the Giveacar service. Design and printing is taken care of through Giveacar’s design contact.

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Win 5000 customizable flyers for your charity

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Win 5000 customizable flyers for your charity

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Nov
22

Where are you, winter?

By admin

Trivia

Do you remember when it used to snow loads on Christmas day? No, neither can we... ...

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This morning when I woke up, it was still pretty dark outside. Gloomy days ahead, I thought. Mumble, grumble, cold weather I muttered to myself. Wrapped up in layers and a scarf, I stepped outside. And immediately started sweating as it turned out to be so mild that a fair number of passing school kids were still sporting shorts.

Where is winter? Why isn't it here so I can moan about it properly?

When I was in primary school, we learned about the seasons and even though quite a bit of time has passed since those glory days I am still very sure that November is a winter month. Not being able to complain about the chilly weather is really messing with my grumpyoldman schedule©.

‘Well, steady on’ you say. ‘We’re just starting out, it’s going to be a lovely white Christmas!’ Not so, my friends.

According to the Met Office, wintry weather is more likely between January and March than December. I think it’s a given that most people in the UK would say that January and February are the coldest months of the year. But wintry weather does not mean a white Christmas and certainly not one that would reproduce scenes from The Snowman.

Apparently, we have only had truly white Christmases FOUR times in the last FIFTY-ONE years. I'm talking about proper snow on the ground, not the three flakes that gets everyone really excited these days. The pressure on Mr Christmas to produce the goods reaches fever point every year – and with the rate of climate change the way it is, you can see him (or her!) failing to perform on a much more regular basis.

I wonder how long it will be before a White Christmas is a thing of legend, something to tell your kids about as, on December 25th you gaze out on what seems to be a summer’s day. Cue Bing Crosby…

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This morning when I woke up, it was still pretty dark outside. Gloomy days ahead, I thought. Mumble, grumble, cold weather I muttered to myself. Wrapped up in layers and a scarf, I stepped outside. And immediately started sweating as it turned out to be so mild that a fair number of passing school kids were still sporting shorts.

Where is winter? Why isn't it here so I can moan about it properly?

When I was in primary school, we learned about the seasons and even though quite a bit of time has passed since those glory days I am still very sure that November is a winter month. Not being able to complain about the chilly weather is really messing with my grumpyoldman schedule©.

‘Well, steady on’ you say. ‘We’re just starting out, it’s going to be a lovely white Christmas!’ Not so, my friends.

According to the Met Office, wintry weather is more likely between January and March than December. I think it’s a given that most people in the UK would say that January and February are the coldest months of the year. But wintry weather does not mean a white Christmas and certainly not one that would reproduce scenes from The Snowman.

Apparently, we have only had truly white Christmases FOUR times in the last FIFTY-ONE years. I'm talking about proper snow on the ground, not the three flakes that gets everyone really excited these days. The pressure on Mr Christmas to produce the goods reaches fever point every year – and with the rate of climate change the way it is, you can see him (or her!) failing to perform on a much more regular basis.

I wonder how long it will be before a White Christmas is a thing of legend, something to tell your kids about as, on December 25th you gaze out on what seems to be a summer’s day. Cue Bing Crosby…

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This morning when I woke up, it was still pretty dark outside. Gloomy days ahead, I thought. Mumble, grumble, cold weather I muttered to myself. Wrapped up in layers and a scarf, I stepped outside. And immediately started sweating as it turned out to be so mild that a fair number of passing school kids were still sporting shorts.

Where is winter? Why isn't it here so I can moan about it properly?

When I was in primary school, we learned about the seasons and even though quite a bit of time has passed since those glory days I am still very sure that November is a winter month. Not being able to complain about the chilly weather is really messing with my grumpyoldman schedule©.

‘Well, steady on’ you say. ‘We’re just starting out, it’s going to be a lovely white Christmas!’ Not so, my friends.

According to the Met Office, wintry weather is more likely between January and March than December. I think it’s a given that most people in the UK would say that January and February are the coldest months of the year. But wintry weather does not mean a white Christmas and certainly not one that would reproduce scenes from The Snowman.

Apparently, we have only had truly white Christmases FOUR times in the last FIFTY-ONE years. I'm talking about proper snow on the ground, not the three flakes that gets everyone really excited these days. The pressure on Mr Christmas to produce the goods reaches fever point every year – and with the rate of climate change the way it is, you can see him (or her!) failing to perform on a much more regular basis.

I wonder how long it will be before a White Christmas is a thing of legend, something to tell your kids about as, on December 25th you gaze out on what seems to be a summer’s day. Cue Bing Crosby…

[summary] => Do you remember when it used to snow loads on Christmas day? No, neither can we... [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>

This morning when I woke up, it was still pretty dark outside. Gloomy days ahead, I thought. Mumble, grumble, cold weather I muttered to myself. Wrapped up in layers and a scarf, I stepped outside. And immediately started sweating as it turned out to be so mild that a fair number of passing school kids were still sporting shorts.

Where is winter? Why isn't it here so I can moan about it properly?

When I was in primary school, we learned about the seasons and even though quite a bit of time has passed since those glory days I am still very sure that November is a winter month. Not being able to complain about the chilly weather is really messing with my grumpyoldman schedule©.

‘Well, steady on’ you say. ‘We’re just starting out, it’s going to be a lovely white Christmas!’ Not so, my friends.

According to the Met Office, wintry weather is more likely between January and March than December. I think it’s a given that most people in the UK would say that January and February are the coldest months of the year. But wintry weather does not mean a white Christmas and certainly not one that would reproduce scenes from The Snowman.

Apparently, we have only had truly white Christmases FOUR times in the last FIFTY-ONE years. I'm talking about proper snow on the ground, not the three flakes that gets everyone really excited these days. The pressure on Mr Christmas to produce the goods reaches fever point every year – and with the rate of climate change the way it is, you can see him (or her!) failing to perform on a much more regular basis.

I wonder how long it will be before a White Christmas is a thing of legend, something to tell your kids about as, on December 25th you gaze out on what seems to be a summer’s day. Cue Bing Crosby…

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This morning when I woke up, it was still pretty dark outside. Gloomy days ahead, I thought. Mumble, grumble, cold weather I muttered to myself. Wrapped up in layers and a scarf, I stepped outside. And immediately started sweating as it turned out to be so mild that a fair number of passing school kids were still sporting shorts.

Where is winter? Why isn't it here so I can moan about it properly?

When I was in primary school, we learned about the seasons and even though quite a bit of time has passed since those glory days I am still very sure that November is a winter month. Not being able to complain about the chilly weather is really messing with my grumpyoldman schedule©.

‘Well, steady on’ you say. ‘We’re just starting out, it’s going to be a lovely white Christmas!’ Not so, my friends.

According to the Met Office, wintry weather is more likely between January and March than December. I think it’s a given that most people in the UK would say that January and February are the coldest months of the year. But wintry weather does not mean a white Christmas and certainly not one that would reproduce scenes from The Snowman.

Apparently, we have only had truly white Christmases FOUR times in the last FIFTY-ONE years. I'm talking about proper snow on the ground, not the three flakes that gets everyone really excited these days. The pressure on Mr Christmas to produce the goods reaches fever point every year – and with the rate of climate change the way it is, you can see him (or her!) failing to perform on a much more regular basis.

I wonder how long it will be before a White Christmas is a thing of legend, something to tell your kids about as, on December 25th you gaze out on what seems to be a summer’s day. Cue Bing Crosby…

[summary] => Do you remember when it used to snow loads on Christmas day? No, neither can we... [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>

This morning when I woke up, it was still pretty dark outside. Gloomy days ahead, I thought. Mumble, grumble, cold weather I muttered to myself. Wrapped up in layers and a scarf, I stepped outside. And immediately started sweating as it turned out to be so mild that a fair number of passing school kids were still sporting shorts.

Where is winter? Why isn't it here so I can moan about it properly?

When I was in primary school, we learned about the seasons and even though quite a bit of time has passed since those glory days I am still very sure that November is a winter month. Not being able to complain about the chilly weather is really messing with my grumpyoldman schedule©.

‘Well, steady on’ you say. ‘We’re just starting out, it’s going to be a lovely white Christmas!’ Not so, my friends.

According to the Met Office, wintry weather is more likely between January and March than December. I think it’s a given that most people in the UK would say that January and February are the coldest months of the year. But wintry weather does not mean a white Christmas and certainly not one that would reproduce scenes from The Snowman.

Apparently, we have only had truly white Christmases FOUR times in the last FIFTY-ONE years. I'm talking about proper snow on the ground, not the three flakes that gets everyone really excited these days. The pressure on Mr Christmas to produce the goods reaches fever point every year – and with the rate of climate change the way it is, you can see him (or her!) failing to perform on a much more regular basis.

I wonder how long it will be before a White Christmas is a thing of legend, something to tell your kids about as, on December 25th you gaze out on what seems to be a summer’s day. Cue Bing Crosby…

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Do you remember when it used to snow loads on Christmas day? No, neither can we...

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Nov
1

The amazing fundraising story of the Mare and Foal Sanctuary and Giveacar

By admin

Charities

How one small charity used Giveacar extremely effectively and managed to raise £1500 in a month, and counting! ...

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MareAndFoal


Mare and Foal Sanctuary is a smaller charity registered with Giveacar that rescues horses and ponies in need and cares for them. At Giveacar, we want small charities to get as many donations as possible from our scheme, and this is best achieved through active promotion and marketing of our service. Your supporters may have no idea that the old banger collecting dust in their garage can be converted into funds for the causes closest to their hearts!

Mare and Foal really took this to heart, and attached a one-page leaflet in a September mailshot to all their past donors. The leaflet was simple, under 100 words and included a logo for Mare and Foal and a logo for Giveacar and crucially a large, easy to read telephone number for Giveacar. Here at Giveacar we noticed an immediate response, with five or six calls a day regarding Mare and Foal and the possibility of donating a car, which went on for roughly three weeks. By the middle of October Giveacar had cleared £1500 in donations for the charity, three weeks after the first Mare and Foal donation.

Donations started rolling in from all over the country, and have continued a steady run at a lower level into October, meaning there are currently lots of cars still being processed for Mare and Foal.

Here are three basic things you can do to improve donations -
1. Keep a prominent link to us on the website - remember Giveacar is a fundraising tool and you need to tell your supporters about it to get the most out of it.
2. Newsletters! Publications! Magazines! You produce these to access your offline audience; there may be a hidden well of support out there that all the tweets and likes in the world won't access.
3. Past Donor followup. Your past donors or current donors may be comfortable with their regular or one off donation amounts. What if they had a car sitting in the drive they wanted to get rid of, however? That's your donation on the drive, and it'll end up in a scrap merchant's pocket if they don't know they can give it to your charity. So mention Giveacar next time you contact them.

Truly an inspirational story, and we hope other charity fundraisers reading this will be inspired to do the same and generate a boost for their coffers as we head towards Christmas. [summary] => How one small charity used Giveacar extremely effectively and managed to raise £1500 in a month, and counting! [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>

MareAndFoal




Mare and Foal Sanctuary is a smaller charity registered with Giveacar that rescues horses and ponies in need and cares for them. At Giveacar, we want small charities to get as many donations as possible from our scheme, and this is best achieved through active promotion and marketing of our service. Your supporters may have no idea that the old banger collecting dust in their garage can be converted into funds for the causes closest to their hearts!




Mare and Foal really took this to heart, and attached a one-page leaflet in a September mailshot to all their past donors. The leaflet was simple, under 100 words and included a logo for Mare and Foal and a logo for Giveacar and crucially a large, easy to read telephone number for Giveacar. Here at Giveacar we noticed an immediate response, with five or six calls a day regarding Mare and Foal and the possibility of donating a car, which went on for roughly three weeks. By the middle of October Giveacar had cleared £1500 in donations for the charity, three weeks after the first Mare and Foal donation.




Donations started rolling in from all over the country, and have continued a steady run at a lower level into October, meaning there are currently lots of cars still being processed for Mare and Foal.




Here are three basic things you can do to improve donations -


1. Keep a prominent link to us on the website - remember Giveacar is a fundraising tool and you need to tell your supporters about it to get the most out of it.


2. Newsletters! Publications! Magazines! You produce these to access your offline audience; there may be a hidden well of support out there that all the tweets and likes in the world won't access.


3. Past Donor followup. Your past donors or current donors may be comfortable with their regular or one off donation amounts. What if they had a car sitting in the drive they wanted to get rid of, however? That's your donation on the drive, and it'll end up in a scrap merchant's pocket if they don't know they can give it to your charity. So mention Giveacar next time you contact them.




Truly an inspirational story, and we hope other charity fundraisers reading this will be inspired to do the same and generate a boost for their coffers as we head towards Christmas.

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How one small charity used Giveacar extremely effectively and managed to raise £1500 in a month, and counting!

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MareAndFoal


Mare and Foal Sanctuary is a smaller charity registered with Giveacar that rescues horses and ponies in need and cares for them. At Giveacar, we want small charities to get as many donations as possible from our scheme, and this is best achieved through active promotion and marketing of our service. Your supporters may have no idea that the old banger collecting dust in their garage can be converted into funds for the causes closest to their hearts!

Mare and Foal really took this to heart, and attached a one-page leaflet in a September mailshot to all their past donors. The leaflet was simple, under 100 words and included a logo for Mare and Foal and a logo for Giveacar and crucially a large, easy to read telephone number for Giveacar. Here at Giveacar we noticed an immediate response, with five or six calls a day regarding Mare and Foal and the possibility of donating a car, which went on for roughly three weeks. By the middle of October Giveacar had cleared £1500 in donations for the charity, three weeks after the first Mare and Foal donation.

Donations started rolling in from all over the country, and have continued a steady run at a lower level into October, meaning there are currently lots of cars still being processed for Mare and Foal.

Here are three basic things you can do to improve donations -
1. Keep a prominent link to us on the website - remember Giveacar is a fundraising tool and you need to tell your supporters about it to get the most out of it.
2. Newsletters! Publications! Magazines! You produce these to access your offline audience; there may be a hidden well of support out there that all the tweets and likes in the world won't access.
3. Past Donor followup. Your past donors or current donors may be comfortable with their regular or one off donation amounts. What if they had a car sitting in the drive they wanted to get rid of, however? That's your donation on the drive, and it'll end up in a scrap merchant's pocket if they don't know they can give it to your charity. So mention Giveacar next time you contact them.

Truly an inspirational story, and we hope other charity fundraisers reading this will be inspired to do the same and generate a boost for their coffers as we head towards Christmas. [summary] => How one small charity used Giveacar extremely effectively and managed to raise £1500 in a month, and counting! [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>

MareAndFoal




Mare and Foal Sanctuary is a smaller charity registered with Giveacar that rescues horses and ponies in need and cares for them. At Giveacar, we want small charities to get as many donations as possible from our scheme, and this is best achieved through active promotion and marketing of our service. Your supporters may have no idea that the old banger collecting dust in their garage can be converted into funds for the causes closest to their hearts!




Mare and Foal really took this to heart, and attached a one-page leaflet in a September mailshot to all their past donors. The leaflet was simple, under 100 words and included a logo for Mare and Foal and a logo for Giveacar and crucially a large, easy to read telephone number for Giveacar. Here at Giveacar we noticed an immediate response, with five or six calls a day regarding Mare and Foal and the possibility of donating a car, which went on for roughly three weeks. By the middle of October Giveacar had cleared £1500 in donations for the charity, three weeks after the first Mare and Foal donation.




Donations started rolling in from all over the country, and have continued a steady run at a lower level into October, meaning there are currently lots of cars still being processed for Mare and Foal.




Here are three basic things you can do to improve donations -


1. Keep a prominent link to us on the website - remember Giveacar is a fundraising tool and you need to tell your supporters about it to get the most out of it.


2. Newsletters! Publications! Magazines! You produce these to access your offline audience; there may be a hidden well of support out there that all the tweets and likes in the world won't access.


3. Past Donor followup. Your past donors or current donors may be comfortable with their regular or one off donation amounts. What if they had a car sitting in the drive they wanted to get rid of, however? That's your donation on the drive, and it'll end up in a scrap merchant's pocket if they don't know they can give it to your charity. So mention Giveacar next time you contact them.




Truly an inspirational story, and we hope other charity fundraisers reading this will be inspired to do the same and generate a boost for their coffers as we head towards Christmas.

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MareAndFoal


Mare and Foal Sanctuary is a smaller charity registered with Giveacar that rescues horses and ponies in need and cares for them. At Giveacar, we want small charities to get as many donations as possible from our scheme, and this is best achieved through active promotion and marketing of our service. Your supporters may have no idea that the old banger collecting dust in their garage can be converted into funds for the causes closest to their hearts!

Mare and Foal really took this to heart, and attached a one-page leaflet in a September mailshot to all their past donors. The leaflet was simple, under 100 words and included a logo for Mare and Foal and a logo for Giveacar and crucially a large, easy to read telephone number for Giveacar. Here at Giveacar we noticed an immediate response, with five or six calls a day regarding Mare and Foal and the possibility of donating a car, which went on for roughly three weeks. By the middle of October Giveacar had cleared £1500 in donations for the charity, three weeks after the first Mare and Foal donation.

Donations started rolling in from all over the country, and have continued a steady run at a lower level into October, meaning there are currently lots of cars still being processed for Mare and Foal.

Here are three basic things you can do to improve donations -
1. Keep a prominent link to us on the website - remember Giveacar is a fundraising tool and you need to tell your supporters about it to get the most out of it.
2. Newsletters! Publications! Magazines! You produce these to access your offline audience; there may be a hidden well of support out there that all the tweets and likes in the world won't access.
3. Past Donor followup. Your past donors or current donors may be comfortable with their regular or one off donation amounts. What if they had a car sitting in the drive they wanted to get rid of, however? That's your donation on the drive, and it'll end up in a scrap merchant's pocket if they don't know they can give it to your charity. So mention Giveacar next time you contact them.

Truly an inspirational story, and we hope other charity fundraisers reading this will be inspired to do the same and generate a boost for their coffers as we head towards Christmas. [summary] => How one small charity used Giveacar extremely effectively and managed to raise £1500 in a month, and counting! [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>

MareAndFoal




Mare and Foal Sanctuary is a smaller charity registered with Giveacar that rescues horses and ponies in need and cares for them. At Giveacar, we want small charities to get as many donations as possible from our scheme, and this is best achieved through active promotion and marketing of our service. Your supporters may have no idea that the old banger collecting dust in their garage can be converted into funds for the causes closest to their hearts!




Mare and Foal really took this to heart, and attached a one-page leaflet in a September mailshot to all their past donors. The leaflet was simple, under 100 words and included a logo for Mare and Foal and a logo for Giveacar and crucially a large, easy to read telephone number for Giveacar. Here at Giveacar we noticed an immediate response, with five or six calls a day regarding Mare and Foal and the possibility of donating a car, which went on for roughly three weeks. By the middle of October Giveacar had cleared £1500 in donations for the charity, three weeks after the first Mare and Foal donation.




Donations started rolling in from all over the country, and have continued a steady run at a lower level into October, meaning there are currently lots of cars still being processed for Mare and Foal.




Here are three basic things you can do to improve donations -


1. Keep a prominent link to us on the website - remember Giveacar is a fundraising tool and you need to tell your supporters about it to get the most out of it.


2. Newsletters! Publications! Magazines! You produce these to access your offline audience; there may be a hidden well of support out there that all the tweets and likes in the world won't access.


3. Past Donor followup. Your past donors or current donors may be comfortable with their regular or one off donation amounts. What if they had a car sitting in the drive they wanted to get rid of, however? That's your donation on the drive, and it'll end up in a scrap merchant's pocket if they don't know they can give it to your charity. So mention Giveacar next time you contact them.




Truly an inspirational story, and we hope other charity fundraisers reading this will be inspired to do the same and generate a boost for their coffers as we head towards Christmas.

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Oct
4

Looking at Generational Differences in Charity Giving

By admin

Are younger generations failing to keep up with their forebears in the generosity stakes? At a glance this would appear to be the case as more than half of donations are from over 60s....

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Are younger generations failing to keep up with their forebears in the generosity stakes? At a glance this would appear to be the case as more than half of donations are from over 60s. The CAF report expresses its concern that charities are beginning to suffer from a donation deficit due to young people being less generous in their donations meaning charities are becoming largely dependent upon the older generation for their survival.

Most charities will recognise that different age groups have different capabilities and are able to support charities in very different capacities but this has not stopped them from becoming dependent upon their older generation of supporters who are perhaps more loyal, vulnerable and financially able than younger generations. The exploitation of that vulnerability through direct debit schemes that require a level of commitment beyond the supporters’ means could be the subject of a blog by itself. With the exception of the few, most charities are failing to recognise the younger generations as an untapped fundraising resource. It seems that the majority are too focused on the short term financial outcome of any venture as opposed to gathering support which will have benefits for many years to come. While young people may not donate as much money to charity, they are more engaged in campaigning, volunteering and participating in fundraising events. The Charity Commission urges charities to think seriously about the benefits of involving young people- they have experience, understanding and enthusiasm to contribute. Charities that are looking at a successful and sustainable future are those that are making an effort to stimulate interest among the younger generation and building relationships with them via their social media or encouraging their involvement in their fundraising events and campaigns.

Each generation is affected by a different set of social, political and economic factors that affect how they seek to address social issues of the day, and impact causes that are important to them. As we know, personal experience of a cause is a common motivator for many donations; certain charities such as hospices and those involved in medical research are more likely to benefit from the older generation. The younger generation are more likely to support overseas aid and development. What exactly is motivating them to do this? One possible explanation for young people’s engagement in such charities is their more idealistic attitudes for creating change in the world. Also, social media platforms such as Facebook and Twitter are hugely influential on the younger generation; they can be made instantly aware of international causes and issues. Although charities are utilising these platforms to engage with the younger generation, more needs to be done to ensure support from them because they are tomorrow’s donors.

Looking at generational differences matters enormously in charitable giving and many non-profits are missing out because they are not strategically angling their fundraising methods at the correct age groups. Different age groups relate to different causes, respond differently to charity communications and have different methods of supporting their chosen charities. If charities fail to focus on harnessing the interest and support of the younger generation, they will suffer in the long term.

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Are younger generations failing to keep up with their forebears in the generosity stakes? At a glance this would appear to be the case as more than half of donations are from over 60s. The CAF report expresses its concern that charities are beginning to suffer from a donation deficit due to young people being less generous in their donations meaning charities are becoming largely dependent upon the older generation for their survival.

Most charities will recognise that different age groups have different capabilities and are able to support charities in very different capacities but this has not stopped them from becoming dependent upon their older generation of supporters who are perhaps more loyal, vulnerable and financially able than younger generations. The exploitation of that vulnerability through direct debit schemes that require a level of commitment beyond the supporters’ means could be the subject of a blog by itself. With the exception of the few, most charities are failing to recognise the younger generations as an untapped fundraising resource. It seems that the majority are too focused on the short term financial outcome of any venture as opposed to gathering support which will have benefits for many years to come. While young people may not donate as much money to charity, they are more engaged in campaigning, volunteering and participating in fundraising events. The Charity Commission urges charities to think seriously about the benefits of involving young people- they have experience, understanding and enthusiasm to contribute. Charities that are looking at a successful and sustainable future are those that are making an effort to stimulate interest among the younger generation and building relationships with them via their social media or encouraging their involvement in their fundraising events and campaigns.

Each generation is affected by a different set of social, political and economic factors that affect how they seek to address social issues of the day, and impact causes that are important to them. As we know, personal experience of a cause is a common motivator for many donations; certain charities such as hospices and those involved in medical research are more likely to benefit from the older generation. The younger generation are more likely to support overseas aid and development. What exactly is motivating them to do this? One possible explanation for young people’s engagement in such charities is their more idealistic attitudes for creating change in the world. Also, social media platforms such as Facebook and Twitter are hugely influential on the younger generation; they can be made instantly aware of international causes and issues. Although charities are utilising these platforms to engage with the younger generation, more needs to be done to ensure support from them because they are tomorrow’s donors.

Looking at generational differences matters enormously in charitable giving and many non-profits are missing out because they are not strategically angling their fundraising methods at the correct age groups. Different age groups relate to different causes, respond differently to charity communications and have different methods of supporting their chosen charities. If charities fail to focus on harnessing the interest and support of the younger generation, they will suffer in the long term.

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Are younger generations failing to keep up with their forebears in the generosity stakes? At a glance this would appear to be the case as more than half of donations are from over 60s. The CAF report expresses its concern that charities are beginning to suffer from a donation deficit due to young people being less generous in their donations meaning charities are becoming largely dependent upon the older generation for their survival.

Most charities will recognise that different age groups have different capabilities and are able to support charities in very different capacities but this has not stopped them from becoming dependent upon their older generation of supporters who are perhaps more loyal, vulnerable and financially able than younger generations. The exploitation of that vulnerability through direct debit schemes that require a level of commitment beyond the supporters’ means could be the subject of a blog by itself. With the exception of the few, most charities are failing to recognise the younger generations as an untapped fundraising resource. It seems that the majority are too focused on the short term financial outcome of any venture as opposed to gathering support which will have benefits for many years to come. While young people may not donate as much money to charity, they are more engaged in campaigning, volunteering and participating in fundraising events. The Charity Commission urges charities to think seriously about the benefits of involving young people- they have experience, understanding and enthusiasm to contribute. Charities that are looking at a successful and sustainable future are those that are making an effort to stimulate interest among the younger generation and building relationships with them via their social media or encouraging their involvement in their fundraising events and campaigns.

Each generation is affected by a different set of social, political and economic factors that affect how they seek to address social issues of the day, and impact causes that are important to them. As we know, personal experience of a cause is a common motivator for many donations; certain charities such as hospices and those involved in medical research are more likely to benefit from the older generation. The younger generation are more likely to support overseas aid and development. What exactly is motivating them to do this? One possible explanation for young people’s engagement in such charities is their more idealistic attitudes for creating change in the world. Also, social media platforms such as Facebook and Twitter are hugely influential on the younger generation; they can be made instantly aware of international causes and issues. Although charities are utilising these platforms to engage with the younger generation, more needs to be done to ensure support from them because they are tomorrow’s donors.

Looking at generational differences matters enormously in charitable giving and many non-profits are missing out because they are not strategically angling their fundraising methods at the correct age groups. Different age groups relate to different causes, respond differently to charity communications and have different methods of supporting their chosen charities. If charities fail to focus on harnessing the interest and support of the younger generation, they will suffer in the long term.

[summary] => [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>

Are younger generations failing to keep up with their forebears in the generosity stakes? At a glance this would appear to be the case as more than half of donations are from over 60s. The CAF report expresses its concern that charities are beginning to suffer from a donation deficit due to young people being less generous in their donations meaning charities are becoming largely dependent upon the older generation for their survival.

Most charities will recognise that different age groups have different capabilities and are able to support charities in very different capacities but this has not stopped them from becoming dependent upon their older generation of supporters who are perhaps more loyal, vulnerable and financially able than younger generations. The exploitation of that vulnerability through direct debit schemes that require a level of commitment beyond the supporters’ means could be the subject of a blog by itself. With the exception of the few, most charities are failing to recognise the younger generations as an untapped fundraising resource. It seems that the majority are too focused on the short term financial outcome of any venture as opposed to gathering support which will have benefits for many years to come. While young people may not donate as much money to charity, they are more engaged in campaigning, volunteering and participating in fundraising events. The Charity Commission urges charities to think seriously about the benefits of involving young people- they have experience, understanding and enthusiasm to contribute. Charities that are looking at a successful and sustainable future are those that are making an effort to stimulate interest among the younger generation and building relationships with them via their social media or encouraging their involvement in their fundraising events and campaigns.

Each generation is affected by a different set of social, political and economic factors that affect how they seek to address social issues of the day, and impact causes that are important to them. As we know, personal experience of a cause is a common motivator for many donations; certain charities such as hospices and those involved in medical research are more likely to benefit from the older generation. The younger generation are more likely to support overseas aid and development. What exactly is motivating them to do this? One possible explanation for young people’s engagement in such charities is their more idealistic attitudes for creating change in the world. Also, social media platforms such as Facebook and Twitter are hugely influential on the younger generation; they can be made instantly aware of international causes and issues. Although charities are utilising these platforms to engage with the younger generation, more needs to be done to ensure support from them because they are tomorrow’s donors.

Looking at generational differences matters enormously in charitable giving and many non-profits are missing out because they are not strategically angling their fundraising methods at the correct age groups. Different age groups relate to different causes, respond differently to charity communications and have different methods of supporting their chosen charities. If charities fail to focus on harnessing the interest and support of the younger generation, they will suffer in the long term.

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Are younger generations failing to keep up with their forebears in the generosity stakes? At a glance this would appear to be the case as more than half of donations are from over 60s.

) ) )
Aug
1

Busk... If You Dare

By admin

Trivia

Did you know there were buskers on London Underground trains? No, neither did we... ...

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About three months ago, I was sat on the District Line heading home after a day’s work when something slightly unusual happened: Some buskers got on the actual train.

Outrage! The underground system sucks enough as it is without adding a tedious plague of buskers to its repertoire. I and my fellow commuters were doing our best to avoid eye contact, keep quiet and generally ignore the existence of anything else other than the copy of that day’s paper/ a mobile phone/ a book, when three youths got on and started being all happy and encouraging and, worst of all, noisy. Ew, youths.

I was lucky enough to be wearing earphones at the time so I turned up the volume and sank in to Radio 4’s I’m Sorry I haven’t a Clue (or was it Nicki Minaj’s interesting take on the need for a correct location in which to earn an income ‘Beez in the trap’- I forget), fixing my gaze somewhere past the hat the buskers were clearly going to hand around after they had finished irritating everyone on the train. Then something really unusual happened.

As I glanced around, I noticed that people were… smiling. What on earth was going on? Taking out my earphones, I found myself listening to the trio belting out Madonna’s Like a Virgin, on a guitar, drum and trumpet – a weird combo that turned out to be funny and refreshing. They added some snappy banter to the end of it and reaped the rewards as most people dug into their pockets to give them a little sumthin’ sumthin’. Fair play to you boys, on that day, in that carriage, you were awesome. Someone else must have thought so too because they posted this video of you (on a different train, but same song: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nd24xEHZcRo.

So, they made me a convert, no longer a busker hater… appreciative of this noble and courageous art. Or not, as it turns out.

Yesterday, I saw them again. They played a different set of songs and managed to anger the whole carriage (including me). I think only one person gave them some change and even then it looked grudging. As I was getting off I spoke to the guitarist and he agreed that it had been a tough audience and that they should have played ‘Like a Virgin’.

So a word of warning, potential buskers: If you are going to illegally busk on the London Underground trains, bring your A-Game, because you will not find a grouchier bunch of people than on the London Underground between the hours of 5.30pm and 7.30pm. [summary] => Did you know there were buskers on London Underground trains? No, neither did we... [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>

About three months ago, I was sat on the District Line heading home after a day’s work when something slightly unusual happened: Some buskers got on the actual train.

Outrage! The underground system sucks enough as it is without adding a tedious plague of buskers to its repertoire. I and my fellow commuters were doing our best to avoid eye contact, keep quiet and generally ignore the existence of anything else other than the copy of that day’s paper/ a mobile phone/ a book, when three youths got on and started being all happy and encouraging and, worst of all, noisy. Ew, youths.

I was lucky enough to be wearing earphones at the time so I turned up the volume and sank in to Radio 4’s I’m Sorry I haven’t a Clue (or was it Nicki Minaj’s interesting take on the need for a correct location in which to earn an income ‘Beez in the trap’- I forget), fixing my gaze somewhere past the hat the buskers were clearly going to hand around after they had finished irritating everyone on the train. Then something really unusual happened.

As I glanced around, I noticed that people were… smiling. What on earth was going on? Taking out my earphones, I found myself listening to the trio belting out Madonna’s Like a Virgin, on a guitar, drum and trumpet – a weird combo that turned out to be funny and refreshing. They added some snappy banter to the end of it and reaped the rewards as most people dug into their pockets to give them a little sumthin’ sumthin’. Fair play to you boys, on that day, in that carriage, you were awesome. Someone else must have thought so too because they posted this video of you (on a different train, but same song: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nd24xEHZcRo.

So, they made me a convert, no longer a busker hater… appreciative of this noble and courageous art. Or not, as it turns out.

Yesterday, I saw them again. They played a different set of songs and managed to anger the whole carriage (including me). I think only one person gave them some change and even then it looked grudging. As I was getting off I spoke to the guitarist and he agreed that it had been a tough audience and that they should have played ‘Like a Virgin’.

So a word of warning, potential buskers: If you are going to illegally busk on the London Underground trains, bring your A-Game, because you will not find a grouchier bunch of people than on the London Underground between the hours of 5.30pm and 7.30pm.

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Did you know there were buskers on London Underground trains? No, neither did we...

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About three months ago, I was sat on the District Line heading home after a day’s work when something slightly unusual happened: Some buskers got on the actual train.

Outrage! The underground system sucks enough as it is without adding a tedious plague of buskers to its repertoire. I and my fellow commuters were doing our best to avoid eye contact, keep quiet and generally ignore the existence of anything else other than the copy of that day’s paper/ a mobile phone/ a book, when three youths got on and started being all happy and encouraging and, worst of all, noisy. Ew, youths.

I was lucky enough to be wearing earphones at the time so I turned up the volume and sank in to Radio 4’s I’m Sorry I haven’t a Clue (or was it Nicki Minaj’s interesting take on the need for a correct location in which to earn an income ‘Beez in the trap’- I forget), fixing my gaze somewhere past the hat the buskers were clearly going to hand around after they had finished irritating everyone on the train. Then something really unusual happened.

As I glanced around, I noticed that people were… smiling. What on earth was going on? Taking out my earphones, I found myself listening to the trio belting out Madonna’s Like a Virgin, on a guitar, drum and trumpet – a weird combo that turned out to be funny and refreshing. They added some snappy banter to the end of it and reaped the rewards as most people dug into their pockets to give them a little sumthin’ sumthin’. Fair play to you boys, on that day, in that carriage, you were awesome. Someone else must have thought so too because they posted this video of you (on a different train, but same song: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nd24xEHZcRo.

So, they made me a convert, no longer a busker hater… appreciative of this noble and courageous art. Or not, as it turns out.

Yesterday, I saw them again. They played a different set of songs and managed to anger the whole carriage (including me). I think only one person gave them some change and even then it looked grudging. As I was getting off I spoke to the guitarist and he agreed that it had been a tough audience and that they should have played ‘Like a Virgin’.

So a word of warning, potential buskers: If you are going to illegally busk on the London Underground trains, bring your A-Game, because you will not find a grouchier bunch of people than on the London Underground between the hours of 5.30pm and 7.30pm. [summary] => Did you know there were buskers on London Underground trains? No, neither did we... [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>

About three months ago, I was sat on the District Line heading home after a day’s work when something slightly unusual happened: Some buskers got on the actual train.

Outrage! The underground system sucks enough as it is without adding a tedious plague of buskers to its repertoire. I and my fellow commuters were doing our best to avoid eye contact, keep quiet and generally ignore the existence of anything else other than the copy of that day’s paper/ a mobile phone/ a book, when three youths got on and started being all happy and encouraging and, worst of all, noisy. Ew, youths.

I was lucky enough to be wearing earphones at the time so I turned up the volume and sank in to Radio 4’s I’m Sorry I haven’t a Clue (or was it Nicki Minaj’s interesting take on the need for a correct location in which to earn an income ‘Beez in the trap’- I forget), fixing my gaze somewhere past the hat the buskers were clearly going to hand around after they had finished irritating everyone on the train. Then something really unusual happened.

As I glanced around, I noticed that people were… smiling. What on earth was going on? Taking out my earphones, I found myself listening to the trio belting out Madonna’s Like a Virgin, on a guitar, drum and trumpet – a weird combo that turned out to be funny and refreshing. They added some snappy banter to the end of it and reaped the rewards as most people dug into their pockets to give them a little sumthin’ sumthin’. Fair play to you boys, on that day, in that carriage, you were awesome. Someone else must have thought so too because they posted this video of you (on a different train, but same song: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nd24xEHZcRo.

So, they made me a convert, no longer a busker hater… appreciative of this noble and courageous art. Or not, as it turns out.

Yesterday, I saw them again. They played a different set of songs and managed to anger the whole carriage (including me). I think only one person gave them some change and even then it looked grudging. As I was getting off I spoke to the guitarist and he agreed that it had been a tough audience and that they should have played ‘Like a Virgin’.

So a word of warning, potential buskers: If you are going to illegally busk on the London Underground trains, bring your A-Game, because you will not find a grouchier bunch of people than on the London Underground between the hours of 5.30pm and 7.30pm.

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Did you know there were buskers on London Underground trains? No, neither did we...

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About three months ago, I was sat on the District Line heading home after a day’s work when something slightly unusual happened: Some buskers got on the actual train.

Outrage! The underground system sucks enough as it is without adding a tedious plague of buskers to its repertoire. I and my fellow commuters were doing our best to avoid eye contact, keep quiet and generally ignore the existence of anything else other than the copy of that day’s paper/ a mobile phone/ a book, when three youths got on and started being all happy and encouraging and, worst of all, noisy. Ew, youths.

I was lucky enough to be wearing earphones at the time so I turned up the volume and sank in to Radio 4’s I’m Sorry I haven’t a Clue (or was it Nicki Minaj’s interesting take on the need for a correct location in which to earn an income ‘Beez in the trap’- I forget), fixing my gaze somewhere past the hat the buskers were clearly going to hand around after they had finished irritating everyone on the train. Then something really unusual happened.

As I glanced around, I noticed that people were… smiling. What on earth was going on? Taking out my earphones, I found myself listening to the trio belting out Madonna’s Like a Virgin, on a guitar, drum and trumpet – a weird combo that turned out to be funny and refreshing. They added some snappy banter to the end of it and reaped the rewards as most people dug into their pockets to give them a little sumthin’ sumthin’. Fair play to you boys, on that day, in that carriage, you were awesome. Someone else must have thought so too because they posted this video of you (on a different train, but same song: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nd24xEHZcRo.

So, they made me a convert, no longer a busker hater… appreciative of this noble and courageous art. Or not, as it turns out.

Yesterday, I saw them again. They played a different set of songs and managed to anger the whole carriage (including me). I think only one person gave them some change and even then it looked grudging. As I was getting off I spoke to the guitarist and he agreed that it had been a tough audience and that they should have played ‘Like a Virgin’.

So a word of warning, potential buskers: If you are going to illegally busk on the London Underground trains, bring your A-Game, because you will not find a grouchier bunch of people than on the London Underground between the hours of 5.30pm and 7.30pm. [summary] => Did you know there were buskers on London Underground trains? No, neither did we... [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>

About three months ago, I was sat on the District Line heading home after a day’s work when something slightly unusual happened: Some buskers got on the actual train.

Outrage! The underground system sucks enough as it is without adding a tedious plague of buskers to its repertoire. I and my fellow commuters were doing our best to avoid eye contact, keep quiet and generally ignore the existence of anything else other than the copy of that day’s paper/ a mobile phone/ a book, when three youths got on and started being all happy and encouraging and, worst of all, noisy. Ew, youths.

I was lucky enough to be wearing earphones at the time so I turned up the volume and sank in to Radio 4’s I’m Sorry I haven’t a Clue (or was it Nicki Minaj’s interesting take on the need for a correct location in which to earn an income ‘Beez in the trap’- I forget), fixing my gaze somewhere past the hat the buskers were clearly going to hand around after they had finished irritating everyone on the train. Then something really unusual happened.

As I glanced around, I noticed that people were… smiling. What on earth was going on? Taking out my earphones, I found myself listening to the trio belting out Madonna’s Like a Virgin, on a guitar, drum and trumpet – a weird combo that turned out to be funny and refreshing. They added some snappy banter to the end of it and reaped the rewards as most people dug into their pockets to give them a little sumthin’ sumthin’. Fair play to you boys, on that day, in that carriage, you were awesome. Someone else must have thought so too because they posted this video of you (on a different train, but same song: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nd24xEHZcRo.

So, they made me a convert, no longer a busker hater… appreciative of this noble and courageous art. Or not, as it turns out.

Yesterday, I saw them again. They played a different set of songs and managed to anger the whole carriage (including me). I think only one person gave them some change and even then it looked grudging. As I was getting off I spoke to the guitarist and he agreed that it had been a tough audience and that they should have played ‘Like a Virgin’.

So a word of warning, potential buskers: If you are going to illegally busk on the London Underground trains, bring your A-Game, because you will not find a grouchier bunch of people than on the London Underground between the hours of 5.30pm and 7.30pm.

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Did you know there were buskers on London Underground trains? No, neither did we...

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Jul
9

Hedgehog Bottom

By admin

About Giveacar Charities

Giveacar takes a trip to see the residents of Hedgehog Bottom. ...

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                                            [value] => Behind an unobtrusive cottage door in the Berkshire countryside live, on occasion, some 120 hedgehogs. No, this isn’t the opening of a Beatrix Potter story, this is Hedgehog Bottom.  

Set up by Gillian Lucraft after her encounter with Speedy Gonzales (a swift little hoglet that she discovered in her garden whilst clearing up food damage in 2007) the Hedgehog sanctuary has been going strong for around 5 years, and is still growing. Now the hogs take up much of the living room and garden of Gilian’s house, with a new hog hospital being built where the shed once stood. 

Two members of the Giveacar team were lucky enough to visit Hedgehog Bottom last week, to take a look at what your cars help to support! 

Although we arrived on a less the pleasant day, we reached Thatcham excited by what we might find. On entering the beautiful little cottage we were immediately presented to the hogs in the ICU/anti-natal ward. Several little families were dotted around the room. Some were mothers and their litters, but there were also a few babies who had been brought in because their mother was unable to look after them. The other residents were being kept inside in hutches, or incubators, because they were recovering from serious injuries or illnesses. 

Then, after we were properly introduced, the moment we had both been waiting for…we got to hold some babies. A few weeks old, but still small enough to hold in one hand, we helped to transfer them to the ‘holding pen’ while their hutch was cleaned out. And boy what a mess they had made! Gill explained that the babies ate a concoction called ‘slop’, which they liked to walk in as much as eat. But never the less they were adorable!  Nonetheless, although they were extremely cute (I could quite happily have taken one home… though I don’t think the cats would have been too happy about that) the exciting atmosphere was marred by the conspicuous absence of their mother. 

Gill then showed us one of her newer cases, who had been attacked by a dog. When she took her out of the incubator she was unable to ball up, and Gill showed us where the dog had damaged her eye and nose. She was clearly very ill. 

Gill explained that most of the cases that she gets in are due to dog attacks, lawn mowers, strimmers or people causing unintentional harm. Surprisingly, cars did not feature in the top four. So keep those dogs under control, and take a look around your garden before your take care of your lawn, you never know who is under your bushes! And if you want to help the little guy in your garden, cat biscuits are the best thing to leave out, not bread and milk (hedgehogs are lactose intolerant!) and that if you see a hedgehog lying flat, or out during the day chances are you should call a hedgehog rescue, just to be on the safe side. Then if you really want to make your garden hog friendly, consider building a hog house! http://www.hedgehog-rescue.org.uk/houses.php

Each hedgehog that stays in Hedgehog Bottom over the winter (last year that was 120) costs £100 to house and look after. So to look after all of the new born who lose their mothers, as well as the malnourished and injured hogs that come in, Gill needs a lot of time, space and money. So why not donate your car, and look after a poorly hedgehog this winter.  

For more information about hog to help the next Mrs Tiggy Winkle who comes through your garden visit http://www.hedgehog-rescue.org.uk.   

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Behind an unobtrusive cottage door in the Berkshire countryside live, on occasion, some 120 hedgehogs. No, this isn’t the opening of a Beatrix Potter story, this is Hedgehog Bottom.

Set up by Gillian Lucraft after her encounter with Speedy Gonzales (a swift little hoglet that she discovered in her garden whilst clearing up food damage in 2007) the Hedgehog sanctuary has been going strong for around 5 years, and is still growing. Now the hogs take up much of the living room and garden of Gilian’s house, with a new hog hospital being built where the shed once stood.

Two members of the Giveacar team were lucky enough to visit Hedgehog Bottom last week, to take a look at what your cars help to support!

Although we arrived on a less the pleasant day, we reached Thatcham excited by what we might find. On entering the beautiful little cottage we were immediately presented to the hogs in the ICU/anti-natal ward. Several little families were dotted around the room. Some were mothers and their litters, but there were also a few babies who had been brought in because their mother was unable to look after them. The other residents were being kept inside in hutches, or incubators, because they were recovering from serious injuries or illnesses.

Then, after we were properly introduced, the moment we had both been waiting for…we got to hold some babies. A few weeks old, but still small enough to hold in one hand, we helped to transfer them to the ‘holding pen’ while their hutch was cleaned out. And boy what a mess they had made! Gill explained that the babies ate a concoction called ‘slop’, which they liked to walk in as much as eat. But never the less they were adorable! Nonetheless, although they were extremely cute (I could quite happily have taken one home… though I don’t think the cats would have been too happy about that) the exciting atmosphere was marred by the conspicuous absence of their mother.

Gill then showed us one of her newer cases, who had been attacked by a dog. When she took her out of the incubator she was unable to ball up, and Gill showed us where the dog had damaged her eye and nose. She was clearly very ill.

Gill explained that most of the cases that she gets in are due to dog attacks, lawn mowers, strimmers or people causing unintentional harm. Surprisingly, cars did not feature in the top four. So keep those dogs under control, and take a look around your garden before your take care of your lawn, you never know who is under your bushes! And if you want to help the little guy in your garden, cat biscuits are the best thing to leave out, not bread and milk (hedgehogs are lactose intolerant!) and that if you see a hedgehog lying flat, or out during the day chances are you should call a hedgehog rescue, just to be on the safe side. Then if you really want to make your garden hog friendly, consider building a hog house! http://www.hedgehog-rescue.org.uk/houses.php

Each hedgehog that stays in Hedgehog Bottom over the winter (last year that was 120) costs £100 to house and look after. So to look after all of the new born who lose their mothers, as well as the malnourished and injured hogs that come in, Gill needs a lot of time, space and money. So why not donate your car, and look after a poorly hedgehog this winter.

For more information about hog to help the next Mrs Tiggy Winkle who comes through your garden visit http://www.hedgehog-rescue.org.uk.

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Giveacar takes a trip to see the residents of Hedgehog Bottom.

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No, this isn’t the opening of a Beatrix Potter story, this is Hedgehog Bottom. Set up by Gillian Lucraft after her encounter with Speedy Gonzales (a swift little hoglet that she discovered in her garden whilst clearing up food damage in 2007) the Hedgehog sanctuary has been going strong for around 5 years, and is still growing. Now the hogs take up much of the living room and garden of Gilian’s house, with a new hog hospital being built where the shed once stood. Two members of the Giveacar team were lucky enough to visit Hedgehog Bottom last week, to take a look at what your cars help to support! Although we arrived on a less the pleasant day, we reached Thatcham excited by what we might find. On entering the beautiful little cottage we were immediately presented to the hogs in the ICU/anti-natal ward. Several little families were dotted around the room. Some were mothers and their litters, but there were also a few babies who had been brought in because their mother was unable to look after them. The other residents were being kept inside in hutches, or incubators, because they were recovering from serious injuries or illnesses. Then, after we were properly introduced, the moment we had both been waiting for…we got to hold some babies. A few weeks old, but still small enough to hold in one hand, we helped to transfer them to the ‘holding pen’ while their hutch was cleaned out. And boy what a mess they had made! Gill explained that the babies ate a concoction called ‘slop’, which they liked to walk in as much as eat. But never the less they were adorable! Nonetheless, although they were extremely cute (I could quite happily have taken one home… though I don’t think the cats would have been too happy about that) the exciting atmosphere was marred by the conspicuous absence of their mother. Gill then showed us one of her newer cases, who had been attacked by a dog. When she took her out of the incubator she was unable to ball up, and Gill showed us where the dog had damaged her eye and nose. She was clearly very ill. Gill explained that most of the cases that she gets in are due to dog attacks, lawn mowers, strimmers or people causing unintentional harm. Surprisingly, cars did not feature in the top four. So keep those dogs under control, and take a look around your garden before your take care of your lawn, you never know who is under your bushes! And if you want to help the little guy in your garden, cat biscuits are the best thing to leave out, not bread and milk (hedgehogs are lactose intolerant!) and that if you see a hedgehog lying flat, or out during the day chances are you should call a hedgehog rescue, just to be on the safe side. Then if you really want to make your garden hog friendly, consider building a hog house! http://www.hedgehog-rescue.org.uk/houses.php Each hedgehog that stays in Hedgehog Bottom over the winter (last year that was 120) costs £100 to house and look after. So to look after all of the new born who lose their mothers, as well as the malnourished and injured hogs that come in, Gill needs a lot of time, space and money. So why not donate your car, and look after a poorly hedgehog this winter. For more information about hog to help the next Mrs Tiggy Winkle who comes through your garden visit http://www.hedgehog-rescue.org.uk. [summary] => Giveacar takes a trip to see the residents of Hedgehog Bottom. [format] => filtered_html [safe_value] =>

Behind an unobtrusive cottage door in the Berkshire countryside live, on occasion, some 120 hedgehogs. No, this isn’t the opening of a Beatrix Potter story, this is Hedgehog Bottom.

Set up by Gillian Lucraft after her encounter with Speedy Gonzales (a swift little hoglet that she discovered in her garden whilst clearing up food damage in 2007) the Hedgehog sanctuary has been going strong for around 5 years, and is still growing. Now the hogs take up much of the living room and garden of Gilian’s house, with a new hog hospital being built where the shed once stood.

Two members of the Giveacar team were lucky enough to visit Hedgehog Bottom last week, to take a look at what your cars help to support!

Although we arrived on a less the pleasant day, we reached Thatcham excited by what we might find. On entering the beautiful little cottage we were immediately presented to the hogs in the ICU/anti-natal ward. Several little families were dotted around the room. Some were mothers and their litters, but there were also a few babies who had been brought in because their mother was unable to look after them. The other residents were being kept inside in hutches, or incubators, because they were recovering from serious injuries or illnesses.

Then, after we were properly introduced, the moment we had both been waiting for…we got to hold some babies. A few weeks old, but still small enough to hold in one hand, we helped to transfer them to the ‘holding pen’ while their hutch was cleaned out. And boy what a mess they had made! Gill explained that the babies ate a concoction called ‘slop’, which they liked to walk in as much as eat. But never the less they were adorable! Nonetheless, although they were extremely cute (I could quite happily have taken one home… though I don’t think the cats would have been too happy about that) the exciting atmosphere was marred by the conspicuous absence of their mother.

Gill then showed us one of her newer cases, who had been attacked by a dog. When she took her out of the incubator she was unable to ball up, and Gill showed us where the dog had damaged her eye and nose. She was clearly very ill.

Gill explained that most of the cases that she gets in are due to dog attacks, lawn mowers, strimmers or people causing unintentional harm. Surprisingly, cars did not feature in the top four. So keep those dogs under control, and take a look around your garden before your take care of your lawn, you never know who is under your bushes! And if you want to help the little guy in your garden, cat biscuits are the best thing to leave out, not bread and milk (hedgehogs are lactose intolerant!) and that if you see a hedgehog lying flat, or out during the day chances are you should call a hedgehog rescue, just to be on the safe side. Then if you really want to make your garden hog friendly, consider building a hog house! http://www.hedgehog-rescue.org.uk/houses.php

Each hedgehog that stays in Hedgehog Bottom over the winter (last year that was 120) costs £100 to house and look after. So to look after all of the new born who lose their mothers, as well as the malnourished and injured hogs that come in, Gill needs a lot of time, space and money. So why not donate your car, and look after a poorly hedgehog this winter.

For more information about hog to help the next Mrs Tiggy Winkle who comes through your garden visit http://www.hedgehog-rescue.org.uk.

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Giveacar takes a trip to see the residents of Hedgehog Bottom.

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No, this isn’t the opening of a Beatrix Potter story, this is Hedgehog Bottom. Set up by Gillian Lucraft after her encounter with Speedy Gonzales (a swift little hoglet that she discovered in her garden whilst clearing up food damage in 2007) the Hedgehog sanctuary has been going strong for around 5 years, and is still growing. Now the hogs take up much of the living room and garden of Gilian’s house, with a new hog hospital being built where the shed once stood. Two members of the Giveacar team were lucky enough to visit Hedgehog Bottom last week, to take a look at what your cars help to support! Although we arrived on a less the pleasant day, we reached Thatcham excited by what we might find. On entering the beautiful little cottage we were immediately presented to the hogs in the ICU/anti-natal ward. Several little families were dotted around the room. Some were mothers and their litters, but there were also a few babies who had been brought in because their mother was unable to look after them. The other residents were being kept inside in hutches, or incubators, because they were recovering from serious injuries or illnesses. Then, after we were properly introduced, the moment we had both been waiting for…we got to hold some babies. A few weeks old, but still small enough to hold in one hand, we helped to transfer them to the ‘holding pen’ while their hutch was cleaned out. And boy what a mess they had made! Gill explained that the babies ate a concoction called ‘slop’, which they liked to walk in as much as eat. But never the less they were adorable! Nonetheless, although they were extremely cute (I could quite happily have taken one home… though I don’t think the cats would have been too happy about that) the exciting atmosphere was marred by the conspicuous absence of their mother. Gill then showed us one of her newer cases, who had been attacked by a dog. When she took her out of the incubator she was unable to ball up, and Gill showed us where the dog had damaged her eye and nose. She was clearly very ill. Gill explained that most of the cases that she gets in are due to dog attacks, lawn mowers, strimmers or people causing unintentional harm. Surprisingly, cars did not feature in the top four. So keep those dogs under control, and take a look around your garden before your take care of your lawn, you never know who is under your bushes! And if you want to help the little guy in your garden, cat biscuits are the best thing to leave out, not bread and milk (hedgehogs are lactose intolerant!) and that if you see a hedgehog lying flat, or out during the day chances are you should call a hedgehog rescue, just to be on the safe side. Then if you really want to make your garden hog friendly, consider building a hog house! http://www.hedgehog-rescue.org.uk/houses.php Each hedgehog that stays in Hedgehog Bottom over the winter (last year that was 120) costs £100 to house and look after. So to look after all of the new born who lose their mothers, as well as the malnourished and injured hogs that come in, Gill needs a lot of time, space and money. So why not donate your car, and look after a poorly hedgehog this winter. For more information about hog to help the next Mrs Tiggy Winkle who comes through your garden visit http://www.hedgehog-rescue.org.uk. [summary] => Giveacar takes a trip to see the residents of Hedgehog Bottom. [format] => filtered_html [safe_value] =>

Behind an unobtrusive cottage door in the Berkshire countryside live, on occasion, some 120 hedgehogs. No, this isn’t the opening of a Beatrix Potter story, this is Hedgehog Bottom.

Set up by Gillian Lucraft after her encounter with Speedy Gonzales (a swift little hoglet that she discovered in her garden whilst clearing up food damage in 2007) the Hedgehog sanctuary has been going strong for around 5 years, and is still growing. Now the hogs take up much of the living room and garden of Gilian’s house, with a new hog hospital being built where the shed once stood.

Two members of the Giveacar team were lucky enough to visit Hedgehog Bottom last week, to take a look at what your cars help to support!

Although we arrived on a less the pleasant day, we reached Thatcham excited by what we might find. On entering the beautiful little cottage we were immediately presented to the hogs in the ICU/anti-natal ward. Several little families were dotted around the room. Some were mothers and their litters, but there were also a few babies who had been brought in because their mother was unable to look after them. The other residents were being kept inside in hutches, or incubators, because they were recovering from serious injuries or illnesses.

Then, after we were properly introduced, the moment we had both been waiting for…we got to hold some babies. A few weeks old, but still small enough to hold in one hand, we helped to transfer them to the ‘holding pen’ while their hutch was cleaned out. And boy what a mess they had made! Gill explained that the babies ate a concoction called ‘slop’, which they liked to walk in as much as eat. But never the less they were adorable! Nonetheless, although they were extremely cute (I could quite happily have taken one home… though I don’t think the cats would have been too happy about that) the exciting atmosphere was marred by the conspicuous absence of their mother.

Gill then showed us one of her newer cases, who had been attacked by a dog. When she took her out of the incubator she was unable to ball up, and Gill showed us where the dog had damaged her eye and nose. She was clearly very ill.

Gill explained that most of the cases that she gets in are due to dog attacks, lawn mowers, strimmers or people causing unintentional harm. Surprisingly, cars did not feature in the top four. So keep those dogs under control, and take a look around your garden before your take care of your lawn, you never know who is under your bushes! And if you want to help the little guy in your garden, cat biscuits are the best thing to leave out, not bread and milk (hedgehogs are lactose intolerant!) and that if you see a hedgehog lying flat, or out during the day chances are you should call a hedgehog rescue, just to be on the safe side. Then if you really want to make your garden hog friendly, consider building a hog house! http://www.hedgehog-rescue.org.uk/houses.php

Each hedgehog that stays in Hedgehog Bottom over the winter (last year that was 120) costs £100 to house and look after. So to look after all of the new born who lose their mothers, as well as the malnourished and injured hogs that come in, Gill needs a lot of time, space and money. So why not donate your car, and look after a poorly hedgehog this winter.

For more information about hog to help the next Mrs Tiggy Winkle who comes through your garden visit http://www.hedgehog-rescue.org.uk.

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Giveacar takes a trip to see the residents of Hedgehog Bottom.

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Jul
2

Giveacar Roadtrip Competition WIN a prize worth £500!

By admin

About Giveacar

Giveacar Road Trip Competition – Win a prize worth £500 for your charity! Ah, summer… lollies, the beach, camping, hotels, suntan lotion and, well, holiday. Some of you are about to jet off on an adventure, others (like the Giveacar team) are not. But we’re not bitter or anything, we LOVE the office in the summertime, the way the environmentally friendly air-con free room lets your shirt stick to your skin just so and the heat gets so bad that you start hallucinating that your colleague is a giant ice-lolly (some seriously awkward moments there)....

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Giveacar Road Trip Competition – Win a prize worth £500 for your charity!

Ah, summer… lollies, the beach, camping, hotels, suntan lotion and, well, holiday. Some of you are about to jet off on an adventure, others (like the Giveacar team) are not. But we’re not bitter or anything, we LOVE the office in the summertime, the way the environmentally friendly air-con free room lets your shirt stick to your skin just so and the heat gets so bad that you start hallucinating that your colleague is a giant ice-lolly (some seriously awkward moments there). If only someone would take us on holiday with them…

Introducing our latest AWESOME GIVEACAR ROAD TRIP COMPETITION

What you have to do: Print off an A4 (or larger!) piece of paper, displaying the Giveacar logo and your charity logo side by side as large as possible. The aim is to take a picture of you holding this picture with an incredible background view e.g. in front of the Eiffel Tower, Grand Canyon, Pyramids at Giza or Skegness. The winner (as judged by the Team) will be whoever gets the logos in front of the most interesting/impressive background. The Prize: Your charity will be featured on our homepage until you receive at least £500 in donations. Normally the homepage is reserved for charities who have gone above and beyond to promote Giveacar. Generally this means having to print off thousands of flyers, or put up posters in their stores. We know that not all of you have the resources to do that, so we want to give everyone the chance to win a spot as a featured charity. How to enter: All you need to do is put a copy of our logo on an A4 piece of paper and make sure that you put your logo on there so that we know who you are! Then just take your sign away, take a snap and send it to us at charity@giveacar.co.uk. Don’t forget to include your name, the charity’s name and where the pic is taken.

The competition opens at 12 Noon on July 10th and ends on 12 Noon on September 1st.

Terms and conditions: Erm, ‘clean’ pictures only please. Final decision on winner is made by Giveacar. Entries will be posted on our social media and website, so don't send anything in you don't want to see on the internet. Entries by email only. Good Luck! [summary] => [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>

Giveacar Road Trip Competition – Win a prize worth £500 for your charity!

Ah, summer… lollies, the beach, camping, hotels, suntan lotion and, well, holiday. Some of you are about to jet off on an adventure, others (like the Giveacar team) are not. But we’re not bitter or anything, we LOVE the office in the summertime, the way the environmentally friendly air-con free room lets your shirt stick to your skin just so and the heat gets so bad that you start hallucinating that your colleague is a giant ice-lolly (some seriously awkward moments there).
If only someone would take us on holiday with them…

Introducing our latest AWESOME GIVEACAR ROAD TRIP COMPETITION

What you have to do: Print off an A4 (or larger!) piece of paper, displaying the Giveacar logo and your charity logo side by side as large as possible. The aim is to take a picture of you holding this picture with an incredible background view e.g. in front of the Eiffel Tower, Grand Canyon, Pyramids at Giza or Skegness. The winner (as judged by the Team) will be whoever gets the logos in front of the most interesting/impressive background.
The Prize: Your charity will be featured on our homepage until you receive at least £500 in donations. Normally the homepage is reserved for charities who have gone above and beyond to promote Giveacar. Generally this means having to print off thousands of flyers, or put up posters in their stores. We know that not all of you have the resources to do that, so we want to give everyone the chance to win a spot as a featured charity.
How to enter: All you need to do is put a copy of our logo on an A4 piece of paper and make sure that you put your logo on there so that we know who you are! Then just take your sign away, take a snap and send it to us at charity@giveacar.co.uk. Don’t forget to include your name, the charity’s name and where the pic is taken.

The competition opens at 12 Noon on July 10th and ends on 12 Noon on September 1st.

Terms and conditions: Erm, ‘clean’ pictures only please. Final decision on winner is made by Giveacar. Entries will be posted on our social media and website, so don't send anything in you don't want to see on the internet. Entries by email only.

Good Luck!

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Giveacar Road Trip Competition – Win a prize worth £500 for your charity!

Ah, summer… lollies, the beach, camping, hotels, suntan lotion and, well, holiday. Some of you are about to jet off on an adventure, others (like the Giveacar team) are not. But we’re not bitter or anything, we LOVE the office in the summertime, the way the environmentally friendly air-con free room lets your shirt stick to your skin just so and the heat gets so bad that you start hallucinating that your colleague is a giant ice-lolly (some seriously awkward moments there). If only someone would take us on holiday with them…

Introducing our latest AWESOME GIVEACAR ROAD TRIP COMPETITION

What you have to do: Print off an A4 (or larger!) piece of paper, displaying the Giveacar logo and your charity logo side by side as large as possible. The aim is to take a picture of you holding this picture with an incredible background view e.g. in front of the Eiffel Tower, Grand Canyon, Pyramids at Giza or Skegness. The winner (as judged by the Team) will be whoever gets the logos in front of the most interesting/impressive background. The Prize: Your charity will be featured on our homepage until you receive at least £500 in donations. Normally the homepage is reserved for charities who have gone above and beyond to promote Giveacar. Generally this means having to print off thousands of flyers, or put up posters in their stores. We know that not all of you have the resources to do that, so we want to give everyone the chance to win a spot as a featured charity. How to enter: All you need to do is put a copy of our logo on an A4 piece of paper and make sure that you put your logo on there so that we know who you are! Then just take your sign away, take a snap and send it to us at charity@giveacar.co.uk. Don’t forget to include your name, the charity’s name and where the pic is taken.

The competition opens at 12 Noon on July 10th and ends on 12 Noon on September 1st.

Terms and conditions: Erm, ‘clean’ pictures only please. Final decision on winner is made by Giveacar. Entries will be posted on our social media and website, so don't send anything in you don't want to see on the internet. Entries by email only. Good Luck! [summary] => [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>

Giveacar Road Trip Competition – Win a prize worth £500 for your charity!

Ah, summer… lollies, the beach, camping, hotels, suntan lotion and, well, holiday. Some of you are about to jet off on an adventure, others (like the Giveacar team) are not. But we’re not bitter or anything, we LOVE the office in the summertime, the way the environmentally friendly air-con free room lets your shirt stick to your skin just so and the heat gets so bad that you start hallucinating that your colleague is a giant ice-lolly (some seriously awkward moments there).
If only someone would take us on holiday with them…

Introducing our latest AWESOME GIVEACAR ROAD TRIP COMPETITION

What you have to do: Print off an A4 (or larger!) piece of paper, displaying the Giveacar logo and your charity logo side by side as large as possible. The aim is to take a picture of you holding this picture with an incredible background view e.g. in front of the Eiffel Tower, Grand Canyon, Pyramids at Giza or Skegness. The winner (as judged by the Team) will be whoever gets the logos in front of the most interesting/impressive background.
The Prize: Your charity will be featured on our homepage until you receive at least £500 in donations. Normally the homepage is reserved for charities who have gone above and beyond to promote Giveacar. Generally this means having to print off thousands of flyers, or put up posters in their stores. We know that not all of you have the resources to do that, so we want to give everyone the chance to win a spot as a featured charity.
How to enter: All you need to do is put a copy of our logo on an A4 piece of paper and make sure that you put your logo on there so that we know who you are! Then just take your sign away, take a snap and send it to us at charity@giveacar.co.uk. Don’t forget to include your name, the charity’s name and where the pic is taken.

The competition opens at 12 Noon on July 10th and ends on 12 Noon on September 1st.

Terms and conditions: Erm, ‘clean’ pictures only please. Final decision on winner is made by Giveacar. Entries will be posted on our social media and website, so don't send anything in you don't want to see on the internet. Entries by email only.

Good Luck!

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Giveacar Road Trip Competition – Win a prize worth £500 for your charity!

Ah, summer… lollies, the beach, camping, hotels, suntan lotion and, well, holiday. Some of you are about to jet off on an adventure, others (like the Giveacar team) are not. But we’re not bitter or anything, we LOVE the office in the summertime, the way the environmentally friendly air-con free room lets your shirt stick to your skin just so and the heat gets so bad that you start hallucinating that your colleague is a giant ice-lolly (some seriously awkward moments there).

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Giveacar Road Trip Competition – Win a prize worth £500 for your charity!

Ah, summer… lollies, the beach, camping, hotels, suntan lotion and, well, holiday. Some of you are about to jet off on an adventure, others (like the Giveacar team) are not. But we’re not bitter or anything, we LOVE the office in the summertime, the way the environmentally friendly air-con free room lets your shirt stick to your skin just so and the heat gets so bad that you start hallucinating that your colleague is a giant ice-lolly (some seriously awkward moments there). If only someone would take us on holiday with them…

Introducing our latest AWESOME GIVEACAR ROAD TRIP COMPETITION

What you have to do: Print off an A4 (or larger!) piece of paper, displaying the Giveacar logo and your charity logo side by side as large as possible. The aim is to take a picture of you holding this picture with an incredible background view e.g. in front of the Eiffel Tower, Grand Canyon, Pyramids at Giza or Skegness. The winner (as judged by the Team) will be whoever gets the logos in front of the most interesting/impressive background. The Prize: Your charity will be featured on our homepage until you receive at least £500 in donations. Normally the homepage is reserved for charities who have gone above and beyond to promote Giveacar. Generally this means having to print off thousands of flyers, or put up posters in their stores. We know that not all of you have the resources to do that, so we want to give everyone the chance to win a spot as a featured charity. How to enter: All you need to do is put a copy of our logo on an A4 piece of paper and make sure that you put your logo on there so that we know who you are! Then just take your sign away, take a snap and send it to us at charity@giveacar.co.uk. Don’t forget to include your name, the charity’s name and where the pic is taken.

The competition opens at 12 Noon on July 10th and ends on 12 Noon on September 1st.

Terms and conditions: Erm, ‘clean’ pictures only please. Final decision on winner is made by Giveacar. Entries will be posted on our social media and website, so don't send anything in you don't want to see on the internet. Entries by email only. Good Luck! [summary] => [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>

Giveacar Road Trip Competition – Win a prize worth £500 for your charity!

Ah, summer… lollies, the beach, camping, hotels, suntan lotion and, well, holiday. Some of you are about to jet off on an adventure, others (like the Giveacar team) are not. But we’re not bitter or anything, we LOVE the office in the summertime, the way the environmentally friendly air-con free room lets your shirt stick to your skin just so and the heat gets so bad that you start hallucinating that your colleague is a giant ice-lolly (some seriously awkward moments there).
If only someone would take us on holiday with them…

Introducing our latest AWESOME GIVEACAR ROAD TRIP COMPETITION

What you have to do: Print off an A4 (or larger!) piece of paper, displaying the Giveacar logo and your charity logo side by side as large as possible. The aim is to take a picture of you holding this picture with an incredible background view e.g. in front of the Eiffel Tower, Grand Canyon, Pyramids at Giza or Skegness. The winner (as judged by the Team) will be whoever gets the logos in front of the most interesting/impressive background.
The Prize: Your charity will be featured on our homepage until you receive at least £500 in donations. Normally the homepage is reserved for charities who have gone above and beyond to promote Giveacar. Generally this means having to print off thousands of flyers, or put up posters in their stores. We know that not all of you have the resources to do that, so we want to give everyone the chance to win a spot as a featured charity.
How to enter: All you need to do is put a copy of our logo on an A4 piece of paper and make sure that you put your logo on there so that we know who you are! Then just take your sign away, take a snap and send it to us at charity@giveacar.co.uk. Don’t forget to include your name, the charity’s name and where the pic is taken.

The competition opens at 12 Noon on July 10th and ends on 12 Noon on September 1st.

Terms and conditions: Erm, ‘clean’ pictures only please. Final decision on winner is made by Giveacar. Entries will be posted on our social media and website, so don't send anything in you don't want to see on the internet. Entries by email only.

Good Luck!

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Jun
26

Isn’t that what that bloke off the telly has got?

By admin

There are over 7000 charities registered with the charity commission in the United Kingdom. These organisations support people who live with any number of issues from illness’ and disabilities, to supporting poverty or education. With so many organisations competing to be in the limelight for the individual being charitable can be a minefield. So in a society where media bombards you at every opportunity, where every cause is vying for your attention, how do charities make their voice heard?...

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                                            [value] => There are over 7000 charities registered with the charity commission in the United Kingdom. These organisations support people who live with any number of issues from illness’ and disabilities, to supporting poverty or education. With so many organisations competing to be in the limelight for the individual being charitable can be a minefield. So in a society where media bombards you at every opportunity, where every cause is vying for your attention, how do charities make their voice heard?

The media has the power to highlight specific causes. With a public fascination for celebrities the media is always a good bet when looking for publicity. Charities would always receive a boost when their cause is in the media, as their concern is brought to the forefront of the public conciseness. A prime example of this is the revelation last week that reality TV star Jack Osborne has been diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis, by telling the media he has raised the profile of the condition, making people aware of what he and other suffers are going through. 
However, some causes struggle to gain the recognition that they deserve. Arthritis is an example of a cause that is underrepresented by the media. According to the charity Arthritis Care there are 10 million people in the UK who live with the condition, that’s one fifth of the adult population. Of those people who are arthritis sufferers approximately 27,000 are under the age of twenty-five. So if this often debilitating condition affects such a large percentage of the population why is it that we never hear about it?
 
If Arthritis is given any publicity at all it is as an older person affliction which comes from simply getting older. The reality of Arthritis is that it is a horrendous condition that can affect anyone at any age. What’s more, there are over 250 different variations of Arthritis which can occur anywhere in the body, including the autoimmune disease Lupus. Arthritis is clearly a misunderstood condition, yet with so many suffers should there not be more publicity for it? If the media were to give more coverage to Arthritis it would defiantly raise awareness about this under represented cause and may increase donations to Arthritis charities.     

So, with the media being so influential in shaping what you and I think about, it has a big part to play in raising the awareness of unknown causes. With millions tuning into soaps and dramas, an obvious way would be having storylines which feature causes. Last week, according to the website attentional.com, 4.2 Million people watched Billy Lamb being diagnosed with prostate cancer in BBC One’s legal drama Silk, thereby putting the cause in the consciousness of part of the population who may have otherwise not given the disease a second thought. The publicity was capitalised on by Prostate Cancer UK who are currently featuring an interview with the show’s creator Peter Moffet on their website. Moffet chose to feature the story line because of personal experiences, saying, ‘I felt compelled to include this issue in my writing. It is so important to raise awareness of this, the most common cancer in men, so that hopefully in the future fewer men like my father lose their life to the disease’. 

One of the most enduring philosophies of charity is getting people to talk about an issue which raises awareness, this could lead to donations or even to people realising that they are not the only one whose life is affected. Getting a cause in the media is the most effective way of raising awareness. 

So the problem is for a charity is how do you get your cause into the public conciseness? I would suggest that it is human nature to seek out the familiar. So those causes that are given the biggest coverage are the ones that affect the most people. While this is right and belittling these causes is wrong, is it not time that some underrepresented causes find their voice? The media should have more responsibility to raise the awareness of those causes that affect many lives.   

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There are over 7000 charities registered with the charity commission in the United Kingdom. These organisations support people who live with any number of issues from illness’ and disabilities, to supporting poverty or education. With so many organisations competing to be in the limelight for the individual being charitable can be a minefield. So in a society where media bombards you at every opportunity, where every cause is vying for your attention, how do charities make their voice heard?

The media has the power to highlight specific causes. With a public fascination for celebrities the media is always a good bet when looking for publicity. Charities would always receive a boost when their cause is in the media, as their concern is brought to the forefront of the public conciseness. A prime example of this is the revelation last week that reality TV star Jack Osborne has been diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis, by telling the media he has raised the profile of the condition, making people aware of what he and other suffers are going through.
However, some causes struggle to gain the recognition that they deserve. Arthritis is an example of a cause that is underrepresented by the media. According to the charity Arthritis Care there are 10 million people in the UK who live with the condition, that’s one fifth of the adult population. Of those people who are arthritis sufferers approximately 27,000 are under the age of twenty-five. So if this often debilitating condition affects such a large percentage of the population why is it that we never hear about it?

If Arthritis is given any publicity at all it is as an older person affliction which comes from simply getting older. The reality of Arthritis is that it is a horrendous condition that can affect anyone at any age. What’s more, there are over 250 different variations of Arthritis which can occur anywhere in the body, including the autoimmune disease Lupus. Arthritis is clearly a misunderstood condition, yet with so many suffers should there not be more publicity for it? If the media were to give more coverage to Arthritis it would defiantly raise awareness about this under represented cause and may increase donations to Arthritis charities.

So, with the media being so influential in shaping what you and I think about, it has a big part to play in raising the awareness of unknown causes. With millions tuning into soaps and dramas, an obvious way would be having storylines which feature causes. Last week, according to the website attentional.com, 4.2 Million people watched Billy Lamb being diagnosed with prostate cancer in BBC One’s legal drama Silk, thereby putting the cause in the consciousness of part of the population who may have otherwise not given the disease a second thought. The publicity was capitalised on by Prostate Cancer UK who are currently featuring an interview with the show’s creator Peter Moffet on their website. Moffet chose to feature the story line because of personal experiences, saying, ‘I felt compelled to include this issue in my writing. It is so important to raise awareness of this, the most common cancer in men, so that hopefully in the future fewer men like my father lose their life to the disease’.

One of the most enduring philosophies of charity is getting people to talk about an issue which raises awareness, this could lead to donations or even to people realising that they are not the only one whose life is affected. Getting a cause in the media is the most effective way of raising awareness.

So the problem is for a charity is how do you get your cause into the public conciseness? I would suggest that it is human nature to seek out the familiar. So those causes that are given the biggest coverage are the ones that affect the most people. While this is right and belittling these causes is wrong, is it not time that some underrepresented causes find their voice? The media should have more responsibility to raise the awareness of those causes that affect many lives.

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These organisations support people who live with any number of issues from illness’ and disabilities, to supporting poverty or education. With so many organisations competing to be in the limelight for the individual being charitable can be a minefield. So in a society where media bombards you at every opportunity, where every cause is vying for your attention, how do charities make their voice heard? The media has the power to highlight specific causes. With a public fascination for celebrities the media is always a good bet when looking for publicity. Charities would always receive a boost when their cause is in the media, as their concern is brought to the forefront of the public conciseness. A prime example of this is the revelation last week that reality TV star Jack Osborne has been diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis, by telling the media he has raised the profile of the condition, making people aware of what he and other suffers are going through. However, some causes struggle to gain the recognition that they deserve. Arthritis is an example of a cause that is underrepresented by the media. According to the charity Arthritis Care there are 10 million people in the UK who live with the condition, that’s one fifth of the adult population. Of those people who are arthritis sufferers approximately 27,000 are under the age of twenty-five. So if this often debilitating condition affects such a large percentage of the population why is it that we never hear about it? If Arthritis is given any publicity at all it is as an older person affliction which comes from simply getting older. The reality of Arthritis is that it is a horrendous condition that can affect anyone at any age. What’s more, there are over 250 different variations of Arthritis which can occur anywhere in the body, including the autoimmune disease Lupus. Arthritis is clearly a misunderstood condition, yet with so many suffers should there not be more publicity for it? If the media were to give more coverage to Arthritis it would defiantly raise awareness about this under represented cause and may increase donations to Arthritis charities. So, with the media being so influential in shaping what you and I think about, it has a big part to play in raising the awareness of unknown causes. With millions tuning into soaps and dramas, an obvious way would be having storylines which feature causes. Last week, according to the website attentional.com, 4.2 Million people watched Billy Lamb being diagnosed with prostate cancer in BBC One’s legal drama Silk, thereby putting the cause in the consciousness of part of the population who may have otherwise not given the disease a second thought. The publicity was capitalised on by Prostate Cancer UK who are currently featuring an interview with the show’s creator Peter Moffet on their website. Moffet chose to feature the story line because of personal experiences, saying, ‘I felt compelled to include this issue in my writing. It is so important to raise awareness of this, the most common cancer in men, so that hopefully in the future fewer men like my father lose their life to the disease’. One of the most enduring philosophies of charity is getting people to talk about an issue which raises awareness, this could lead to donations or even to people realising that they are not the only one whose life is affected. Getting a cause in the media is the most effective way of raising awareness. So the problem is for a charity is how do you get your cause into the public conciseness? I would suggest that it is human nature to seek out the familiar. So those causes that are given the biggest coverage are the ones that affect the most people. While this is right and belittling these causes is wrong, is it not time that some underrepresented causes find their voice? The media should have more responsibility to raise the awareness of those causes that affect many lives. [summary] => [format] => filtered_html [safe_value] =>

There are over 7000 charities registered with the charity commission in the United Kingdom. These organisations support people who live with any number of issues from illness’ and disabilities, to supporting poverty or education. With so many organisations competing to be in the limelight for the individual being charitable can be a minefield. So in a society where media bombards you at every opportunity, where every cause is vying for your attention, how do charities make their voice heard?

The media has the power to highlight specific causes. With a public fascination for celebrities the media is always a good bet when looking for publicity. Charities would always receive a boost when their cause is in the media, as their concern is brought to the forefront of the public conciseness. A prime example of this is the revelation last week that reality TV star Jack Osborne has been diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis, by telling the media he has raised the profile of the condition, making people aware of what he and other suffers are going through.
However, some causes struggle to gain the recognition that they deserve. Arthritis is an example of a cause that is underrepresented by the media. According to the charity Arthritis Care there are 10 million people in the UK who live with the condition, that’s one fifth of the adult population. Of those people who are arthritis sufferers approximately 27,000 are under the age of twenty-five. So if this often debilitating condition affects such a large percentage of the population why is it that we never hear about it?

If Arthritis is given any publicity at all it is as an older person affliction which comes from simply getting older. The reality of Arthritis is that it is a horrendous condition that can affect anyone at any age. What’s more, there are over 250 different variations of Arthritis which can occur anywhere in the body, including the autoimmune disease Lupus. Arthritis is clearly a misunderstood condition, yet with so many suffers should there not be more publicity for it? If the media were to give more coverage to Arthritis it would defiantly raise awareness about this under represented cause and may increase donations to Arthritis charities.

So, with the media being so influential in shaping what you and I think about, it has a big part to play in raising the awareness of unknown causes. With millions tuning into soaps and dramas, an obvious way would be having storylines which feature causes. Last week, according to the website attentional.com, 4.2 Million people watched Billy Lamb being diagnosed with prostate cancer in BBC One’s legal drama Silk, thereby putting the cause in the consciousness of part of the population who may have otherwise not given the disease a second thought. The publicity was capitalised on by Prostate Cancer UK who are currently featuring an interview with the show’s creator Peter Moffet on their website. Moffet chose to feature the story line because of personal experiences, saying, ‘I felt compelled to include this issue in my writing. It is so important to raise awareness of this, the most common cancer in men, so that hopefully in the future fewer men like my father lose their life to the disease’.

One of the most enduring philosophies of charity is getting people to talk about an issue which raises awareness, this could lead to donations or even to people realising that they are not the only one whose life is affected. Getting a cause in the media is the most effective way of raising awareness.

So the problem is for a charity is how do you get your cause into the public conciseness? I would suggest that it is human nature to seek out the familiar. So those causes that are given the biggest coverage are the ones that affect the most people. While this is right and belittling these causes is wrong, is it not time that some underrepresented causes find their voice? The media should have more responsibility to raise the awareness of those causes that affect many lives.

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There are over 7000 charities registered with the charity commission in the United Kingdom. These organisations support people who live with any number of issues from illness’ and disabilities, to supporting poverty or education. With so many organisations competing to be in the limelight for the individual being charitable can be a minefield. So in a society where media bombards you at every opportunity, where every cause is vying for your attention, how do charities make their voice heard?

) ) )
Jun
8

Stop trying to extinguish the Olympic flame

By admin

Written by TP ...

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olympics blog scrap car

The summer of 2012 is set to be a very British affair. Over the long weekend the Capital was turned into a sea of Red, White and Blue as we celebrated sixty years of Queen Elizabeth II. The uniqueness of 2012 continues as the country will gather behind the England football team on Monday as they play France in their first match at the Euros, while the London Olympics loom only forty-nine days away. The feeling of pageantry and celebration in London over this weekend doesn’t seem to have lasted and the Olympics have failed to capitalise on the Jubilee patriotism. Despite being given the great honour of hosting the Olympics Games, it seems that from the outset Londoners have set the games up to fail.

Anyone who lives in London will have been aware of the impending Olympics since the games were awarded to the capital in 2009, with local news documenting every aspect of the city’s preparation. However with the Olympic flame in Scotland does it really seem to Londoners that their city is gearing up to host the greatest show on earth? Instead of celebrating the fact that the capital is awaiting the eyes of the world in a little over a month, attention seems to be on what could possibly go wrong at the games.

It would seem that the only press coverage for the games has been negative, with an emphasis on the failings of the Olympic Committee, chaired by Lord Coe. Last year when the tickets were released there was fury at the amount of Londoners who failed to get an opportunity to see any events. So when it was announced last week that there was a further 4,000 tickets that would go on sale it was a surprise that instead of welcoming the opportunity for more people to experience the games the press instead chose to criticise the fact that these tickets remain unsold. Likewise when the Olympic kit was unveiled in March instead of getting excited that the kits unveiling put us a step closer to the Games, Stella McCarthy’s design was ridiculed for being too "blue".

Whether you support the Olympics or not they are almost here, and our job as Londoners now is to work together to show the world that we are capable of making this summer spectacular. The time for scrutinising the games is over and for the next four months while the world’s best sportsmen and women compete in the Olympics and Paralympics our job should be to keep calm and carry on. [summary] => Written by TP [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>





olympics blog scrap car




The summer of 2012 is set to be a very British affair. Over the long weekend the Capital was turned into a sea of Red, White and Blue as we celebrated sixty years of Queen Elizabeth II. The uniqueness of 2012 continues as the country will gather behind the England football team on Monday as they play France in their first match at the Euros, while the London Olympics loom only forty-nine days away. The feeling of pageantry and celebration in London over this weekend doesn’t seem to have lasted and the Olympics have failed to capitalise on the Jubilee patriotism. Despite being given the great honour of hosting the Olympics Games, it seems that from the outset Londoners have set the games up to fail.




Anyone who lives in London will have been aware of the impending Olympics since the games were awarded to the capital in 2009, with local news documenting every aspect of the city’s preparation. However with the Olympic flame in Scotland does it really seem to Londoners that their city is gearing up to host the greatest show on earth? Instead of celebrating the fact that the capital is awaiting the eyes of the world in a little over a month, attention seems to be on what could possibly go wrong at the games.




It would seem that the only press coverage for the games has been negative, with an emphasis on the failings of the Olympic Committee, chaired by Lord Coe. Last year when the tickets were released there was fury at the amount of Londoners who failed to get an opportunity to see any events. So when it was announced last week that there was a further 4,000 tickets that would go on sale it was a surprise that instead of welcoming the opportunity for more people to experience the games the press instead chose to criticise the fact that these tickets remain unsold. Likewise when the Olympic kit was unveiled in March instead of getting excited that the kits unveiling put us a step closer to the Games, Stella McCarthy’s design was ridiculed for being too "blue".




Whether you support the Olympics or not they are almost here, and our job as Londoners now is to work together to show the world that we are capable of making this summer spectacular. The time for scrutinising the games is over and for the next four months while the world’s best sportsmen and women compete in the Olympics and Paralympics our job should be to keep calm and carry on.

[safe_summary] =>

Written by TP

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olympics blog scrap car

The summer of 2012 is set to be a very British affair. Over the long weekend the Capital was turned into a sea of Red, White and Blue as we celebrated sixty years of Queen Elizabeth II. The uniqueness of 2012 continues as the country will gather behind the England football team on Monday as they play France in their first match at the Euros, while the London Olympics loom only forty-nine days away. The feeling of pageantry and celebration in London over this weekend doesn’t seem to have lasted and the Olympics have failed to capitalise on the Jubilee patriotism. Despite being given the great honour of hosting the Olympics Games, it seems that from the outset Londoners have set the games up to fail.

Anyone who lives in London will have been aware of the impending Olympics since the games were awarded to the capital in 2009, with local news documenting every aspect of the city’s preparation. However with the Olympic flame in Scotland does it really seem to Londoners that their city is gearing up to host the greatest show on earth? Instead of celebrating the fact that the capital is awaiting the eyes of the world in a little over a month, attention seems to be on what could possibly go wrong at the games.

It would seem that the only press coverage for the games has been negative, with an emphasis on the failings of the Olympic Committee, chaired by Lord Coe. Last year when the tickets were released there was fury at the amount of Londoners who failed to get an opportunity to see any events. So when it was announced last week that there was a further 4,000 tickets that would go on sale it was a surprise that instead of welcoming the opportunity for more people to experience the games the press instead chose to criticise the fact that these tickets remain unsold. Likewise when the Olympic kit was unveiled in March instead of getting excited that the kits unveiling put us a step closer to the Games, Stella McCarthy’s design was ridiculed for being too "blue".

Whether you support the Olympics or not they are almost here, and our job as Londoners now is to work together to show the world that we are capable of making this summer spectacular. The time for scrutinising the games is over and for the next four months while the world’s best sportsmen and women compete in the Olympics and Paralympics our job should be to keep calm and carry on. [summary] => Written by TP [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>





olympics blog scrap car




The summer of 2012 is set to be a very British affair. Over the long weekend the Capital was turned into a sea of Red, White and Blue as we celebrated sixty years of Queen Elizabeth II. The uniqueness of 2012 continues as the country will gather behind the England football team on Monday as they play France in their first match at the Euros, while the London Olympics loom only forty-nine days away. The feeling of pageantry and celebration in London over this weekend doesn’t seem to have lasted and the Olympics have failed to capitalise on the Jubilee patriotism. Despite being given the great honour of hosting the Olympics Games, it seems that from the outset Londoners have set the games up to fail.




Anyone who lives in London will have been aware of the impending Olympics since the games were awarded to the capital in 2009, with local news documenting every aspect of the city’s preparation. However with the Olympic flame in Scotland does it really seem to Londoners that their city is gearing up to host the greatest show on earth? Instead of celebrating the fact that the capital is awaiting the eyes of the world in a little over a month, attention seems to be on what could possibly go wrong at the games.




It would seem that the only press coverage for the games has been negative, with an emphasis on the failings of the Olympic Committee, chaired by Lord Coe. Last year when the tickets were released there was fury at the amount of Londoners who failed to get an opportunity to see any events. So when it was announced last week that there was a further 4,000 tickets that would go on sale it was a surprise that instead of welcoming the opportunity for more people to experience the games the press instead chose to criticise the fact that these tickets remain unsold. Likewise when the Olympic kit was unveiled in March instead of getting excited that the kits unveiling put us a step closer to the Games, Stella McCarthy’s design was ridiculed for being too "blue".




Whether you support the Olympics or not they are almost here, and our job as Londoners now is to work together to show the world that we are capable of making this summer spectacular. The time for scrutinising the games is over and for the next four months while the world’s best sportsmen and women compete in the Olympics and Paralympics our job should be to keep calm and carry on.

[safe_summary] =>

Written by TP

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Written by TP

) ) )
Jun
6

Book Aid International

By admin

Charities

Book Aid International aims to help to sub-Saharan Africa by providing books to help education. Money raised goes towards providing the poorest people in Africa the ability to read, so that they have easier access to change their country from education the ability to vote, to just being able to read medicine bottles. ...

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                                            [value] => For many being able to read is taken for granted. Even if you would class yourself as not being a reader, I bet that you have no idea what the impact of being unable to read would have on your life, after all you are doing it now. Reading is a vital skill that gives people freedom to make choices for themselves, for many in the developed world this process is natural and almost continuous, whether it is in the office, that latest best seller or even catching up with your friends on Facebook, most of the population couldn’t get by without reading. In some parts of the world education of an entire population poses a challenge, and sometimes the ability to read, even the smallest amount, gives people the freedom to make decisions for themselves and take control of their own lives. For the poverty stricken region of sub-Saharan Africa teaching people to read can only be a force for good, the ability to read and write allows people to gain education, to get better jobs and more money, allowing the country to work towards getting itself out of poverty.  
For the developing world being able to read could be the tool to get yourself a better life, and to be able to provide for yourself and your family, this is why the work of Book Aid International is so important. Book Aid International was established in 1954 by Lady Hermione Ranfurly who set up the charity to support the children in the Bahamas who had no access to reading materials. Since the Fifties, Book Aid International has distributed over 30 million books to schools, universities, and libraries across the developing world.  The charity decided in 2007 to focus its efforts on 12 sub-Saharan countries including Cameroon, Ethiopia, Nimibia and South Sudan, with a small presence in Palestine.
In 1948 the Universal Declaration of Human Rights stated that everybody in the world has the right to a free education which is vital to the full development of a personality. Education not only allows personal development, it creates a basis for the progress of a country. Teaching children allows the country to bring itself out of poverty by training doctors, teachers and the people at grass-roots level so they can create their own change.
The money raised by Book Aid International not only provides books which afford an education to hundreds it goes into funding librarians and teachers who will teach the next generation and build a brighter future for the region.  In 2010 Book Aid International joined forces with a library in Embu, Kenya which is located 1Km from the Kenyan General Hospital and Medical Training Collage. The charity helped to support a ‘Health Information Hub’ providing medical resources which support Students and Health Care Workers to gain access to the most up to date medical information to treat their patients. 
Money donated to Book Aid International goes towards helping the 153 Million people in Sub-Saharan Africa who are unable to read and write. It takes £2 to source select and transport a book, but each or these books can help hundreds of people to learn to read and write, allowing people to have a say in their own future and create their own change. So far with your help GiveACar has been able to raise £1,900 for Book Aid International which is 950 books. 

                                            [summary] => Book Aid International aims to help to sub-Saharan Africa by providing books to help education. Money raised goes towards providing the poorest people in Africa the ability to read, so that they have easier access to change their country from education the ability to vote, to just being able to read medicine bottles. 
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For many being able to read is taken for granted. Even if you would class yourself as not being a reader, I bet that you have no idea what the impact of being unable to read would have on your life, after all you are doing it now. Reading is a vital skill that gives people freedom to make choices for themselves, for many in the developed world this process is natural and almost continuous, whether it is in the office, that latest best seller or even catching up with your friends on Facebook, most of the population couldn’t get by without reading. In some parts of the world education of an entire population poses a challenge, and sometimes the ability to read, even the smallest amount, gives people the freedom to make decisions for themselves and take control of their own lives. For the poverty stricken region of sub-Saharan Africa teaching people to read can only be a force for good, the ability to read and write allows people to gain education, to get better jobs and more money, allowing the country to work towards getting itself out of poverty.
For the developing world being able to read could be the tool to get yourself a better life, and to be able to provide for yourself and your family, this is why the work of Book Aid International is so important. Book Aid International was established in 1954 by Lady Hermione Ranfurly who set up the charity to support the children in the Bahamas who had no access to reading materials. Since the Fifties, Book Aid International has distributed over 30 million books to schools, universities, and libraries across the developing world. The charity decided in 2007 to focus its efforts on 12 sub-Saharan countries including Cameroon, Ethiopia, Nimibia and South Sudan, with a small presence in Palestine.
In 1948 the Universal Declaration of Human Rights stated that everybody in the world has the right to a free education which is vital to the full development of a personality. Education not only allows personal development, it creates a basis for the progress of a country. Teaching children allows the country to bring itself out of poverty by training doctors, teachers and the people at grass-roots level so they can create their own change.
The money raised by Book Aid International not only provides books which afford an education to hundreds it goes into funding librarians and teachers who will teach the next generation and build a brighter future for the region. In 2010 Book Aid International joined forces with a library in Embu, Kenya which is located 1Km from the Kenyan General Hospital and Medical Training Collage. The charity helped to support a ‘Health Information Hub’ providing medical resources which support Students and Health Care Workers to gain access to the most up to date medical information to treat their patients.
Money donated to Book Aid International goes towards helping the 153 Million people in Sub-Saharan Africa who are unable to read and write. It takes £2 to source select and transport a book, but each or these books can help hundreds of people to learn to read and write, allowing people to have a say in their own future and create their own change. So far with your help GiveACar has been able to raise £1,900 for Book Aid International which is 950 books.

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Even if you would class yourself as not being a reader, I bet that you have no idea what the impact of being unable to read would have on your life, after all you are doing it now. Reading is a vital skill that gives people freedom to make choices for themselves, for many in the developed world this process is natural and almost continuous, whether it is in the office, that latest best seller or even catching up with your friends on Facebook, most of the population couldn’t get by without reading. In some parts of the world education of an entire population poses a challenge, and sometimes the ability to read, even the smallest amount, gives people the freedom to make decisions for themselves and take control of their own lives. For the poverty stricken region of sub-Saharan Africa teaching people to read can only be a force for good, the ability to read and write allows people to gain education, to get better jobs and more money, allowing the country to work towards getting itself out of poverty. For the developing world being able to read could be the tool to get yourself a better life, and to be able to provide for yourself and your family, this is why the work of Book Aid International is so important. Book Aid International was established in 1954 by Lady Hermione Ranfurly who set up the charity to support the children in the Bahamas who had no access to reading materials. Since the Fifties, Book Aid International has distributed over 30 million books to schools, universities, and libraries across the developing world. The charity decided in 2007 to focus its efforts on 12 sub-Saharan countries including Cameroon, Ethiopia, Nimibia and South Sudan, with a small presence in Palestine. In 1948 the Universal Declaration of Human Rights stated that everybody in the world has the right to a free education which is vital to the full development of a personality. Education not only allows personal development, it creates a basis for the progress of a country. Teaching children allows the country to bring itself out of poverty by training doctors, teachers and the people at grass-roots level so they can create their own change. The money raised by Book Aid International not only provides books which afford an education to hundreds it goes into funding librarians and teachers who will teach the next generation and build a brighter future for the region. In 2010 Book Aid International joined forces with a library in Embu, Kenya which is located 1Km from the Kenyan General Hospital and Medical Training Collage. The charity helped to support a ‘Health Information Hub’ providing medical resources which support Students and Health Care Workers to gain access to the most up to date medical information to treat their patients. Money donated to Book Aid International goes towards helping the 153 Million people in Sub-Saharan Africa who are unable to read and write. It takes £2 to source select and transport a book, but each or these books can help hundreds of people to learn to read and write, allowing people to have a say in their own future and create their own change. So far with your help GiveACar has been able to raise £1,900 for Book Aid International which is 950 books. [summary] => Book Aid International aims to help to sub-Saharan Africa by providing books to help education. Money raised goes towards providing the poorest people in Africa the ability to read, so that they have easier access to change their country from education the ability to vote, to just being able to read medicine bottles. [format] => filtered_html [safe_value] =>

For many being able to read is taken for granted. Even if you would class yourself as not being a reader, I bet that you have no idea what the impact of being unable to read would have on your life, after all you are doing it now. Reading is a vital skill that gives people freedom to make choices for themselves, for many in the developed world this process is natural and almost continuous, whether it is in the office, that latest best seller or even catching up with your friends on Facebook, most of the population couldn’t get by without reading. In some parts of the world education of an entire population poses a challenge, and sometimes the ability to read, even the smallest amount, gives people the freedom to make decisions for themselves and take control of their own lives. For the poverty stricken region of sub-Saharan Africa teaching people to read can only be a force for good, the ability to read and write allows people to gain education, to get better jobs and more money, allowing the country to work towards getting itself out of poverty.
For the developing world being able to read could be the tool to get yourself a better life, and to be able to provide for yourself and your family, this is why the work of Book Aid International is so important. Book Aid International was established in 1954 by Lady Hermione Ranfurly who set up the charity to support the children in the Bahamas who had no access to reading materials. Since the Fifties, Book Aid International has distributed over 30 million books to schools, universities, and libraries across the developing world. The charity decided in 2007 to focus its efforts on 12 sub-Saharan countries including Cameroon, Ethiopia, Nimibia and South Sudan, with a small presence in Palestine.
In 1948 the Universal Declaration of Human Rights stated that everybody in the world has the right to a free education which is vital to the full development of a personality. Education not only allows personal development, it creates a basis for the progress of a country. Teaching children allows the country to bring itself out of poverty by training doctors, teachers and the people at grass-roots level so they can create their own change.
The money raised by Book Aid International not only provides books which afford an education to hundreds it goes into funding librarians and teachers who will teach the next generation and build a brighter future for the region. In 2010 Book Aid International joined forces with a library in Embu, Kenya which is located 1Km from the Kenyan General Hospital and Medical Training Collage. The charity helped to support a ‘Health Information Hub’ providing medical resources which support Students and Health Care Workers to gain access to the most up to date medical information to treat their patients.
Money donated to Book Aid International goes towards helping the 153 Million people in Sub-Saharan Africa who are unable to read and write. It takes £2 to source select and transport a book, but each or these books can help hundreds of people to learn to read and write, allowing people to have a say in their own future and create their own change. So far with your help GiveACar has been able to raise £1,900 for Book Aid International which is 950 books.

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Book Aid International aims to help to sub-Saharan Africa by providing books to help education. Money raised goes towards providing the poorest people in Africa the ability to read, so that they have easier access to change their country from education the ability to vote, to just being able to read medicine bottles.

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Even if you would class yourself as not being a reader, I bet that you have no idea what the impact of being unable to read would have on your life, after all you are doing it now. Reading is a vital skill that gives people freedom to make choices for themselves, for many in the developed world this process is natural and almost continuous, whether it is in the office, that latest best seller or even catching up with your friends on Facebook, most of the population couldn’t get by without reading. In some parts of the world education of an entire population poses a challenge, and sometimes the ability to read, even the smallest amount, gives people the freedom to make decisions for themselves and take control of their own lives. For the poverty stricken region of sub-Saharan Africa teaching people to read can only be a force for good, the ability to read and write allows people to gain education, to get better jobs and more money, allowing the country to work towards getting itself out of poverty. For the developing world being able to read could be the tool to get yourself a better life, and to be able to provide for yourself and your family, this is why the work of Book Aid International is so important. Book Aid International was established in 1954 by Lady Hermione Ranfurly who set up the charity to support the children in the Bahamas who had no access to reading materials. Since the Fifties, Book Aid International has distributed over 30 million books to schools, universities, and libraries across the developing world. The charity decided in 2007 to focus its efforts on 12 sub-Saharan countries including Cameroon, Ethiopia, Nimibia and South Sudan, with a small presence in Palestine. In 1948 the Universal Declaration of Human Rights stated that everybody in the world has the right to a free education which is vital to the full development of a personality. Education not only allows personal development, it creates a basis for the progress of a country. Teaching children allows the country to bring itself out of poverty by training doctors, teachers and the people at grass-roots level so they can create their own change. The money raised by Book Aid International not only provides books which afford an education to hundreds it goes into funding librarians and teachers who will teach the next generation and build a brighter future for the region. In 2010 Book Aid International joined forces with a library in Embu, Kenya which is located 1Km from the Kenyan General Hospital and Medical Training Collage. The charity helped to support a ‘Health Information Hub’ providing medical resources which support Students and Health Care Workers to gain access to the most up to date medical information to treat their patients. Money donated to Book Aid International goes towards helping the 153 Million people in Sub-Saharan Africa who are unable to read and write. It takes £2 to source select and transport a book, but each or these books can help hundreds of people to learn to read and write, allowing people to have a say in their own future and create their own change. So far with your help GiveACar has been able to raise £1,900 for Book Aid International which is 950 books. [summary] => Book Aid International aims to help to sub-Saharan Africa by providing books to help education. Money raised goes towards providing the poorest people in Africa the ability to read, so that they have easier access to change their country from education the ability to vote, to just being able to read medicine bottles. [format] => filtered_html [safe_value] =>

For many being able to read is taken for granted. Even if you would class yourself as not being a reader, I bet that you have no idea what the impact of being unable to read would have on your life, after all you are doing it now. Reading is a vital skill that gives people freedom to make choices for themselves, for many in the developed world this process is natural and almost continuous, whether it is in the office, that latest best seller or even catching up with your friends on Facebook, most of the population couldn’t get by without reading. In some parts of the world education of an entire population poses a challenge, and sometimes the ability to read, even the smallest amount, gives people the freedom to make decisions for themselves and take control of their own lives. For the poverty stricken region of sub-Saharan Africa teaching people to read can only be a force for good, the ability to read and write allows people to gain education, to get better jobs and more money, allowing the country to work towards getting itself out of poverty.
For the developing world being able to read could be the tool to get yourself a better life, and to be able to provide for yourself and your family, this is why the work of Book Aid International is so important. Book Aid International was established in 1954 by Lady Hermione Ranfurly who set up the charity to support the children in the Bahamas who had no access to reading materials. Since the Fifties, Book Aid International has distributed over 30 million books to schools, universities, and libraries across the developing world. The charity decided in 2007 to focus its efforts on 12 sub-Saharan countries including Cameroon, Ethiopia, Nimibia and South Sudan, with a small presence in Palestine.
In 1948 the Universal Declaration of Human Rights stated that everybody in the world has the right to a free education which is vital to the full development of a personality. Education not only allows personal development, it creates a basis for the progress of a country. Teaching children allows the country to bring itself out of poverty by training doctors, teachers and the people at grass-roots level so they can create their own change.
The money raised by Book Aid International not only provides books which afford an education to hundreds it goes into funding librarians and teachers who will teach the next generation and build a brighter future for the region. In 2010 Book Aid International joined forces with a library in Embu, Kenya which is located 1Km from the Kenyan General Hospital and Medical Training Collage. The charity helped to support a ‘Health Information Hub’ providing medical resources which support Students and Health Care Workers to gain access to the most up to date medical information to treat their patients.
Money donated to Book Aid International goes towards helping the 153 Million people in Sub-Saharan Africa who are unable to read and write. It takes £2 to source select and transport a book, but each or these books can help hundreds of people to learn to read and write, allowing people to have a say in their own future and create their own change. So far with your help GiveACar has been able to raise £1,900 for Book Aid International which is 950 books.

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Book Aid International aims to help to sub-Saharan Africa by providing books to help education. Money raised goes towards providing the poorest people in Africa the ability to read, so that they have easier access to change their country from education the ability to vote, to just being able to read medicine bottles.

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