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May
3

The Most Common Car

By admin

About Giveacar Trivia

What is the most commonly donated car? Read on to find out a little more about it ...

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Having processed the donations of over 8,000 cars, Giveacar has seen everything, from classic rides to crushed-up vans, motorbikes and the odd mobility scooter. But one vehicle in particular stands out for the frequency with which it’s donated: the Ford Fiesta. As homage to this super-mini and the overwhelming difference it’s made to charity these last few years, we thought we’d tell you a little bit about its history.

The story of the Ford Fiesta stretches back 40 years, to its approval for development in 1972. At this stage, it was thought that around 500,000 Fiestas would be produced each year, and Ford built new factories in Europe to cope with this. The car that we know affectionately as ‘Fiesta’ today almost had a number of different names: we could well have been pootling around in an Amigo, a Bambi, a Bravo, a Bolero, a Tempo or a Forjito.

The Fiesta was launched in the UK in 1977 and its major selling features, according to the original launch video, were the wide-opening doors, the up-to-the-minute upholstery materials, the ‘sunshine roof’ and the hatchback that offered a versatile luggage space with “precise opening and closing”. The description seems rather quaint now, compared to all the mod-cons and technology on offer these days.

In 1978 the Fiesta became a best-seller in Britain, and it has remained incredibly popular ever since. Last year saw the celebration of 35 years since its UK launch, and it has sold over 12 million units to date. (Meaning there are many more out there just waiting to be given to us!) There have been six different generations that have transported us to the present day:


After the Mark I's 1970s debut, the Mark II Fiesta zoomed into production in 1983. There were a few visual differences and, for the first time, the Fiesta was available with a diesel engine.




In 1989 it was followed by the Mark III, which had the longest production life of any Fiesta. This generation looked very different from its predecessors, and also included 5-door models.



From 1995 the third generation was tailgated by the Mark IV, which boasted features like the new suspension system, meaning that it was much easier to handle than previous versions.




Then, in 2002 the Mark V drove into action. This was the first Fiesta to be sold in Asia and Australasia, and showcased a fancy, bright colour palette.



The Mark VI Fiesta is the latest version to appear on the roads (also known as the Mark VII in the UK) and has come a long way from its 1970s counterpart. Forget sunshine roofs and boots that close precisely; these models have all the modern safety and environmental features as well as employing state-of-the-art technology. They have even earned Jeremy Clarkson’s seal of approval, having survived his ‘What if I go to a shopping centre and get chased by baddies in a Corvette?’ and ‘What if I’m asked to take part in a beach assault with the Royal Marines?’ tests. What more could you want from a car really?

Perhaps the love they feel for this little car is why so many owners have wanted to make the end of the Fiesta’s journey worthwhile. Over 450 of them have rolled their way through Giveacar’s donation scheme, raising over £38,000 for charities all over the world in the process.

So there you have it – a little bit about our most commonly donated car. Now, send us some more!

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Having processed the donations of over 8,000 cars, Giveacar has seen everything, from classic rides to crushed-up vans, motorbikes and the odd mobility scooter. But one vehicle in particular stands out for the frequency with which it’s donated: the Ford Fiesta. As homage to this super-mini and the overwhelming difference it’s made to charity these last few years, we thought we’d tell you a little bit about its history.

The story of the Ford Fiesta stretches back 40 years, to its approval for development in 1972. At this stage, it was thought that around 500,000 Fiestas would be produced each year, and Ford built new factories in Europe to cope with this. The car that we know affectionately as ‘Fiesta’ today almost had a number of different names: we could well have been pootling around in an Amigo, a Bambi, a Bravo, a Bolero, a Tempo or a Forjito.

The Fiesta was launched in the UK in 1977 and its major selling features, according to the original launch video, were the wide-opening doors, the up-to-the-minute upholstery materials, the ‘sunshine roof’ and the hatchback that offered a versatile luggage space with “precise opening and closing”. The description seems rather quaint now, compared to all the mod-cons and technology on offer these days.

In 1978 the Fiesta became a best-seller in Britain, and it has remained incredibly popular ever since. Last year saw the celebration of 35 years since its UK launch, and it has sold over 12 million units to date. (Meaning there are many more out there just waiting to be given to us!) There have been six different generations that have transported us to the present day:




After the Mark I's 1970s debut, the Mark II Fiesta zoomed into production in 1983. There were a few visual differences and, for the first time, the Fiesta was available with a diesel engine.








In 1989 it was followed by the Mark III, which had the longest production life of any Fiesta. This generation looked very different from its predecessors, and also included 5-door models.






From 1995 the third generation was tailgated by the Mark IV, which boasted features like the new suspension system, meaning that it was much easier to handle than previous versions.






Then, in 2002 the Mark V drove into action. This was the first Fiesta to be sold in Asia and Australasia, and showcased a fancy, bright colour palette.





The Mark VI Fiesta is the latest version to appear on the roads (also known as the Mark VII in the UK) and has come a long way from its 1970s counterpart. Forget sunshine roofs and boots that close precisely; these models have all the modern safety and environmental features as well as employing state-of-the-art technology. They have even earned Jeremy Clarkson’s seal of approval, having survived his ‘What if I go to a shopping centre and get chased by baddies in a Corvette?’ and ‘What if I’m asked to take part in a beach assault with the Royal Marines?’ tests. What more could you want from a car really?

Perhaps the love they feel for this little car is why so many owners have wanted to make the end of the Fiesta’s journey worthwhile. Over 450 of them have rolled their way through Giveacar’s donation scheme, raising over £38,000 for charities all over the world in the process.

So there you have it – a little bit about our most commonly donated car. Now, send us some more!

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Having processed the donations of over 8,000 cars, Giveacar has seen everything, from classic rides to crushed-up vans, motorbikes and the odd mobility scooter. But one vehicle in particular stands out for the frequency with which it’s donated: the Ford Fiesta. As homage to this super-mini and the overwhelming difference it’s made to charity these last few years, we thought we’d tell you a little bit about its history.

The story of the Ford Fiesta stretches back 40 years, to its approval for development in 1972. At this stage, it was thought that around 500,000 Fiestas would be produced each year, and Ford built new factories in Europe to cope with this. The car that we know affectionately as ‘Fiesta’ today almost had a number of different names: we could well have been pootling around in an Amigo, a Bambi, a Bravo, a Bolero, a Tempo or a Forjito.

The Fiesta was launched in the UK in 1977 and its major selling features, according to the original launch video, were the wide-opening doors, the up-to-the-minute upholstery materials, the ‘sunshine roof’ and the hatchback that offered a versatile luggage space with “precise opening and closing”. The description seems rather quaint now, compared to all the mod-cons and technology on offer these days.

In 1978 the Fiesta became a best-seller in Britain, and it has remained incredibly popular ever since. Last year saw the celebration of 35 years since its UK launch, and it has sold over 12 million units to date. (Meaning there are many more out there just waiting to be given to us!) There have been six different generations that have transported us to the present day:


After the Mark I's 1970s debut, the Mark II Fiesta zoomed into production in 1983. There were a few visual differences and, for the first time, the Fiesta was available with a diesel engine.




In 1989 it was followed by the Mark III, which had the longest production life of any Fiesta. This generation looked very different from its predecessors, and also included 5-door models.



From 1995 the third generation was tailgated by the Mark IV, which boasted features like the new suspension system, meaning that it was much easier to handle than previous versions.




Then, in 2002 the Mark V drove into action. This was the first Fiesta to be sold in Asia and Australasia, and showcased a fancy, bright colour palette.



The Mark VI Fiesta is the latest version to appear on the roads (also known as the Mark VII in the UK) and has come a long way from its 1970s counterpart. Forget sunshine roofs and boots that close precisely; these models have all the modern safety and environmental features as well as employing state-of-the-art technology. They have even earned Jeremy Clarkson’s seal of approval, having survived his ‘What if I go to a shopping centre and get chased by baddies in a Corvette?’ and ‘What if I’m asked to take part in a beach assault with the Royal Marines?’ tests. What more could you want from a car really?

Perhaps the love they feel for this little car is why so many owners have wanted to make the end of the Fiesta’s journey worthwhile. Over 450 of them have rolled their way through Giveacar’s donation scheme, raising over £38,000 for charities all over the world in the process.

So there you have it – a little bit about our most commonly donated car. Now, send us some more!

[summary] => What is the most commonly donated car? Read on to find out a little more about it [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>

Having processed the donations of over 8,000 cars, Giveacar has seen everything, from classic rides to crushed-up vans, motorbikes and the odd mobility scooter. But one vehicle in particular stands out for the frequency with which it’s donated: the Ford Fiesta. As homage to this super-mini and the overwhelming difference it’s made to charity these last few years, we thought we’d tell you a little bit about its history.

The story of the Ford Fiesta stretches back 40 years, to its approval for development in 1972. At this stage, it was thought that around 500,000 Fiestas would be produced each year, and Ford built new factories in Europe to cope with this. The car that we know affectionately as ‘Fiesta’ today almost had a number of different names: we could well have been pootling around in an Amigo, a Bambi, a Bravo, a Bolero, a Tempo or a Forjito.

The Fiesta was launched in the UK in 1977 and its major selling features, according to the original launch video, were the wide-opening doors, the up-to-the-minute upholstery materials, the ‘sunshine roof’ and the hatchback that offered a versatile luggage space with “precise opening and closing”. The description seems rather quaint now, compared to all the mod-cons and technology on offer these days.

In 1978 the Fiesta became a best-seller in Britain, and it has remained incredibly popular ever since. Last year saw the celebration of 35 years since its UK launch, and it has sold over 12 million units to date. (Meaning there are many more out there just waiting to be given to us!) There have been six different generations that have transported us to the present day:




After the Mark I's 1970s debut, the Mark II Fiesta zoomed into production in 1983. There were a few visual differences and, for the first time, the Fiesta was available with a diesel engine.








In 1989 it was followed by the Mark III, which had the longest production life of any Fiesta. This generation looked very different from its predecessors, and also included 5-door models.






From 1995 the third generation was tailgated by the Mark IV, which boasted features like the new suspension system, meaning that it was much easier to handle than previous versions.






Then, in 2002 the Mark V drove into action. This was the first Fiesta to be sold in Asia and Australasia, and showcased a fancy, bright colour palette.





The Mark VI Fiesta is the latest version to appear on the roads (also known as the Mark VII in the UK) and has come a long way from its 1970s counterpart. Forget sunshine roofs and boots that close precisely; these models have all the modern safety and environmental features as well as employing state-of-the-art technology. They have even earned Jeremy Clarkson’s seal of approval, having survived his ‘What if I go to a shopping centre and get chased by baddies in a Corvette?’ and ‘What if I’m asked to take part in a beach assault with the Royal Marines?’ tests. What more could you want from a car really?

Perhaps the love they feel for this little car is why so many owners have wanted to make the end of the Fiesta’s journey worthwhile. Over 450 of them have rolled their way through Giveacar’s donation scheme, raising over £38,000 for charities all over the world in the process.

So there you have it – a little bit about our most commonly donated car. Now, send us some more!

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Having processed the donations of over 8,000 cars, Giveacar has seen everything, from classic rides to crushed-up vans, motorbikes and the odd mobility scooter. But one vehicle in particular stands out for the frequency with which it’s donated: the Ford Fiesta. As homage to this super-mini and the overwhelming difference it’s made to charity these last few years, we thought we’d tell you a little bit about its history.

The story of the Ford Fiesta stretches back 40 years, to its approval for development in 1972. At this stage, it was thought that around 500,000 Fiestas would be produced each year, and Ford built new factories in Europe to cope with this. The car that we know affectionately as ‘Fiesta’ today almost had a number of different names: we could well have been pootling around in an Amigo, a Bambi, a Bravo, a Bolero, a Tempo or a Forjito.

The Fiesta was launched in the UK in 1977 and its major selling features, according to the original launch video, were the wide-opening doors, the up-to-the-minute upholstery materials, the ‘sunshine roof’ and the hatchback that offered a versatile luggage space with “precise opening and closing”. The description seems rather quaint now, compared to all the mod-cons and technology on offer these days.

In 1978 the Fiesta became a best-seller in Britain, and it has remained incredibly popular ever since. Last year saw the celebration of 35 years since its UK launch, and it has sold over 12 million units to date. (Meaning there are many more out there just waiting to be given to us!) There have been six different generations that have transported us to the present day:


After the Mark I's 1970s debut, the Mark II Fiesta zoomed into production in 1983. There were a few visual differences and, for the first time, the Fiesta was available with a diesel engine.




In 1989 it was followed by the Mark III, which had the longest production life of any Fiesta. This generation looked very different from its predecessors, and also included 5-door models.



From 1995 the third generation was tailgated by the Mark IV, which boasted features like the new suspension system, meaning that it was much easier to handle than previous versions.




Then, in 2002 the Mark V drove into action. This was the first Fiesta to be sold in Asia and Australasia, and showcased a fancy, bright colour palette.



The Mark VI Fiesta is the latest version to appear on the roads (also known as the Mark VII in the UK) and has come a long way from its 1970s counterpart. Forget sunshine roofs and boots that close precisely; these models have all the modern safety and environmental features as well as employing state-of-the-art technology. They have even earned Jeremy Clarkson’s seal of approval, having survived his ‘What if I go to a shopping centre and get chased by baddies in a Corvette?’ and ‘What if I’m asked to take part in a beach assault with the Royal Marines?’ tests. What more could you want from a car really?

Perhaps the love they feel for this little car is why so many owners have wanted to make the end of the Fiesta’s journey worthwhile. Over 450 of them have rolled their way through Giveacar’s donation scheme, raising over £38,000 for charities all over the world in the process.

So there you have it – a little bit about our most commonly donated car. Now, send us some more!

[summary] => What is the most commonly donated car? Read on to find out a little more about it [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>

Having processed the donations of over 8,000 cars, Giveacar has seen everything, from classic rides to crushed-up vans, motorbikes and the odd mobility scooter. But one vehicle in particular stands out for the frequency with which it’s donated: the Ford Fiesta. As homage to this super-mini and the overwhelming difference it’s made to charity these last few years, we thought we’d tell you a little bit about its history.

The story of the Ford Fiesta stretches back 40 years, to its approval for development in 1972. At this stage, it was thought that around 500,000 Fiestas would be produced each year, and Ford built new factories in Europe to cope with this. The car that we know affectionately as ‘Fiesta’ today almost had a number of different names: we could well have been pootling around in an Amigo, a Bambi, a Bravo, a Bolero, a Tempo or a Forjito.

The Fiesta was launched in the UK in 1977 and its major selling features, according to the original launch video, were the wide-opening doors, the up-to-the-minute upholstery materials, the ‘sunshine roof’ and the hatchback that offered a versatile luggage space with “precise opening and closing”. The description seems rather quaint now, compared to all the mod-cons and technology on offer these days.

In 1978 the Fiesta became a best-seller in Britain, and it has remained incredibly popular ever since. Last year saw the celebration of 35 years since its UK launch, and it has sold over 12 million units to date. (Meaning there are many more out there just waiting to be given to us!) There have been six different generations that have transported us to the present day:




After the Mark I's 1970s debut, the Mark II Fiesta zoomed into production in 1983. There were a few visual differences and, for the first time, the Fiesta was available with a diesel engine.








In 1989 it was followed by the Mark III, which had the longest production life of any Fiesta. This generation looked very different from its predecessors, and also included 5-door models.






From 1995 the third generation was tailgated by the Mark IV, which boasted features like the new suspension system, meaning that it was much easier to handle than previous versions.






Then, in 2002 the Mark V drove into action. This was the first Fiesta to be sold in Asia and Australasia, and showcased a fancy, bright colour palette.





The Mark VI Fiesta is the latest version to appear on the roads (also known as the Mark VII in the UK) and has come a long way from its 1970s counterpart. Forget sunshine roofs and boots that close precisely; these models have all the modern safety and environmental features as well as employing state-of-the-art technology. They have even earned Jeremy Clarkson’s seal of approval, having survived his ‘What if I go to a shopping centre and get chased by baddies in a Corvette?’ and ‘What if I’m asked to take part in a beach assault with the Royal Marines?’ tests. What more could you want from a car really?

Perhaps the love they feel for this little car is why so many owners have wanted to make the end of the Fiesta’s journey worthwhile. Over 450 of them have rolled their way through Giveacar’s donation scheme, raising over £38,000 for charities all over the world in the process.

So there you have it – a little bit about our most commonly donated car. Now, send us some more!

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Apr
23

The Power of the Scrap Car

By admin

Charities

An end-of-life car might not appear to have much use, but seeing the difference this can make for charity is enough to make you think again. Read on to find out all about the power of the scrap car. ...

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Everyone has a special place in their hearts for their first car. Usually tiny, old and falling to pieces, it merits a sort of unconditional love. But looking at my M-reg Ford Fiesta, it’s starting to dawn on me that this rickety tin-friend of mine may be past its best. It’s covered in scratches and dents and is rusting badly. The boot doesn’t open, and nor does the bonnet. The clutch doesn’t always work either, meaning that being stuck in reverse on a main road is not an uncommon experience. Then there’s the hole in the exhaust, the temperamental speedometer, and the desperate need for new brake pads. I like to think affectionately that all of this gives my car character. But as the MOT expiry date looms, I’m beginning to realise that my baby might, just might, be verging on the ‘useless’ side and tragically destined for the scrap heap.

However, when you consider that the average scrap car raises £100 for charity, the power it harbours is really quite astounding – and certainly not so tragic. Here are just a few ways in which an old car can make a difference, leaving a legacy to be proud of.

With a scrap car, the Scottish Refugee Council can buy a hot meal for ten families of three who have just fled their county.

At the Rainbow Centre, a scrap car pays for three therapy sessions for children affected by bereavement and life-threatening illness, helping them to come to terms with their grief.

The Venture Trust can use a scrap car to set up two employability sessions, helping young people to write CVs, research jobs, practice interview skills and change their futures.

Reachout! Scotland can use £100 to organise a fantastic adventure or educational trip for their mentees.

A scrap car can provide two days’ worth of hot breakfasts for the 100 guests that visit London City Mission’s centre for the homeless every day.

For the Sambat Trust, a scrap car means that a school library in the Philippines will have 100 new books, enabling children to receive a better education.

Book Aid International can turn a scrap car into 130 new books for a library in Africa.

20 dogs can be fed for an entire week by a scrap car at the Border Collie Trust.

Thanks to a scrap car, a patient will be able to attend Ashgate Hospice’s Palliative day unit once a week, helping to ease their suffering.

Millie’s Trust can train five parents or carers in paediatric first aid thanks to a scrap car.

People with learning disabilities can attend an advocacy group provided by the Thera Trust, giving them a voice and empowering them.

In the hands of Sightsavers, a scrap car will stop 10 people from going blind.

My conclusion? A scrap car has the power to change a huge number of lives. Useless doesn’t come into it.

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Everyone has a special place in their hearts for their first car. Usually tiny, old and falling to pieces, it merits a sort of unconditional love. But looking at my M-reg Ford Fiesta, it’s starting to dawn on me that this rickety tin-friend of mine may be past its best. It’s covered in scratches and dents and is rusting badly. The boot doesn’t open, and nor does the bonnet. The clutch doesn’t always work either, meaning that being stuck in reverse on a main road is not an uncommon experience. Then there’s the hole in the exhaust, the temperamental speedometer, and the desperate need for new brake pads. I like to think affectionately that all of this gives my car character. But as the MOT expiry date looms, I’m beginning to realise that my baby might, just might, be verging on the ‘useless’ side and tragically destined for the scrap heap.

However, when you consider that the average scrap car raises £100 for charity, the power it harbours is really quite astounding – and certainly not so tragic. Here are just a few ways in which an old car can make a difference, leaving a legacy to be proud of.

With a scrap car, the Scottish Refugee Council can buy a hot meal for ten families of three who have just fled their county.

At the Rainbow Centre, a scrap car pays for three therapy sessions for children affected by bereavement and life-threatening illness, helping them to come to terms with their grief.

The Venture Trust can use a scrap car to set up two employability sessions, helping young people to write CVs, research jobs, practice interview skills and change their futures.

Reachout! Scotland can use £100 to organise a fantastic adventure or educational trip for their mentees.

A scrap car can provide two days’ worth of hot breakfasts for the 100 guests that visit London City Mission’s centre for the homeless every day.

For the Sambat Trust, a scrap car means that a school library in the Philippines will have 100 new books, enabling children to receive a better education.

Book Aid International can turn a scrap car into 130 new books for a library in Africa.

20 dogs can be fed for an entire week by a scrap car at the Border Collie Trust.

Thanks to a scrap car, a patient will be able to attend Ashgate Hospice’s Palliative day unit once a week, helping to ease their suffering.

Millie’s Trust can train five parents or carers in paediatric first aid thanks to a scrap car.

People with learning disabilities can attend an advocacy group provided by the Thera Trust, giving them a voice and empowering them.

In the hands of Sightsavers, a scrap car will stop 10 people from going blind.

My conclusion? A scrap car has the power to change a huge number of lives. Useless doesn’t come into it.

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An end-of-life car might not appear to have much use, but seeing the difference this can make for charity is enough to make you think again. Read on to find out all about the power of the scrap car.

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Everyone has a special place in their hearts for their first car. Usually tiny, old and falling to pieces, it merits a sort of unconditional love. But looking at my M-reg Ford Fiesta, it’s starting to dawn on me that this rickety tin-friend of mine may be past its best. It’s covered in scratches and dents and is rusting badly. The boot doesn’t open, and nor does the bonnet. The clutch doesn’t always work either, meaning that being stuck in reverse on a main road is not an uncommon experience. Then there’s the hole in the exhaust, the temperamental speedometer, and the desperate need for new brake pads. I like to think affectionately that all of this gives my car character. But as the MOT expiry date looms, I’m beginning to realise that my baby might, just might, be verging on the ‘useless’ side and tragically destined for the scrap heap.

However, when you consider that the average scrap car raises £100 for charity, the power it harbours is really quite astounding – and certainly not so tragic. Here are just a few ways in which an old car can make a difference, leaving a legacy to be proud of.

With a scrap car, the Scottish Refugee Council can buy a hot meal for ten families of three who have just fled their county.

At the Rainbow Centre, a scrap car pays for three therapy sessions for children affected by bereavement and life-threatening illness, helping them to come to terms with their grief.

The Venture Trust can use a scrap car to set up two employability sessions, helping young people to write CVs, research jobs, practice interview skills and change their futures.

Reachout! Scotland can use £100 to organise a fantastic adventure or educational trip for their mentees.

A scrap car can provide two days’ worth of hot breakfasts for the 100 guests that visit London City Mission’s centre for the homeless every day.

For the Sambat Trust, a scrap car means that a school library in the Philippines will have 100 new books, enabling children to receive a better education.

Book Aid International can turn a scrap car into 130 new books for a library in Africa.

20 dogs can be fed for an entire week by a scrap car at the Border Collie Trust.

Thanks to a scrap car, a patient will be able to attend Ashgate Hospice’s Palliative day unit once a week, helping to ease their suffering.

Millie’s Trust can train five parents or carers in paediatric first aid thanks to a scrap car.

People with learning disabilities can attend an advocacy group provided by the Thera Trust, giving them a voice and empowering them.

In the hands of Sightsavers, a scrap car will stop 10 people from going blind.

My conclusion? A scrap car has the power to change a huge number of lives. Useless doesn’t come into it.

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Everyone has a special place in their hearts for their first car. Usually tiny, old and falling to pieces, it merits a sort of unconditional love. But looking at my M-reg Ford Fiesta, it’s starting to dawn on me that this rickety tin-friend of mine may be past its best. It’s covered in scratches and dents and is rusting badly. The boot doesn’t open, and nor does the bonnet. The clutch doesn’t always work either, meaning that being stuck in reverse on a main road is not an uncommon experience. Then there’s the hole in the exhaust, the temperamental speedometer, and the desperate need for new brake pads. I like to think affectionately that all of this gives my car character. But as the MOT expiry date looms, I’m beginning to realise that my baby might, just might, be verging on the ‘useless’ side and tragically destined for the scrap heap.

However, when you consider that the average scrap car raises £100 for charity, the power it harbours is really quite astounding – and certainly not so tragic. Here are just a few ways in which an old car can make a difference, leaving a legacy to be proud of.

With a scrap car, the Scottish Refugee Council can buy a hot meal for ten families of three who have just fled their county.

At the Rainbow Centre, a scrap car pays for three therapy sessions for children affected by bereavement and life-threatening illness, helping them to come to terms with their grief.

The Venture Trust can use a scrap car to set up two employability sessions, helping young people to write CVs, research jobs, practice interview skills and change their futures.

Reachout! Scotland can use £100 to organise a fantastic adventure or educational trip for their mentees.

A scrap car can provide two days’ worth of hot breakfasts for the 100 guests that visit London City Mission’s centre for the homeless every day.

For the Sambat Trust, a scrap car means that a school library in the Philippines will have 100 new books, enabling children to receive a better education.

Book Aid International can turn a scrap car into 130 new books for a library in Africa.

20 dogs can be fed for an entire week by a scrap car at the Border Collie Trust.

Thanks to a scrap car, a patient will be able to attend Ashgate Hospice’s Palliative day unit once a week, helping to ease their suffering.

Millie’s Trust can train five parents or carers in paediatric first aid thanks to a scrap car.

People with learning disabilities can attend an advocacy group provided by the Thera Trust, giving them a voice and empowering them.

In the hands of Sightsavers, a scrap car will stop 10 people from going blind.

My conclusion? A scrap car has the power to change a huge number of lives. Useless doesn’t come into it.

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Everyone has a special place in their hearts for their first car. Usually tiny, old and falling to pieces, it merits a sort of unconditional love. But looking at my M-reg Ford Fiesta, it’s starting to dawn on me that this rickety tin-friend of mine may be past its best. It’s covered in scratches and dents and is rusting badly. The boot doesn’t open, and nor does the bonnet. The clutch doesn’t always work either, meaning that being stuck in reverse on a main road is not an uncommon experience. Then there’s the hole in the exhaust, the temperamental speedometer, and the desperate need for new brake pads. I like to think affectionately that all of this gives my car character. But as the MOT expiry date looms, I’m beginning to realise that my baby might, just might, be verging on the ‘useless’ side and tragically destined for the scrap heap.

However, when you consider that the average scrap car raises £100 for charity, the power it harbours is really quite astounding – and certainly not so tragic. Here are just a few ways in which an old car can make a difference, leaving a legacy to be proud of.

With a scrap car, the Scottish Refugee Council can buy a hot meal for ten families of three who have just fled their county.

At the Rainbow Centre, a scrap car pays for three therapy sessions for children affected by bereavement and life-threatening illness, helping them to come to terms with their grief.

The Venture Trust can use a scrap car to set up two employability sessions, helping young people to write CVs, research jobs, practice interview skills and change their futures.

Reachout! Scotland can use £100 to organise a fantastic adventure or educational trip for their mentees.

A scrap car can provide two days’ worth of hot breakfasts for the 100 guests that visit London City Mission’s centre for the homeless every day.

For the Sambat Trust, a scrap car means that a school library in the Philippines will have 100 new books, enabling children to receive a better education.

Book Aid International can turn a scrap car into 130 new books for a library in Africa.

20 dogs can be fed for an entire week by a scrap car at the Border Collie Trust.

Thanks to a scrap car, a patient will be able to attend Ashgate Hospice’s Palliative day unit once a week, helping to ease their suffering.

Millie’s Trust can train five parents or carers in paediatric first aid thanks to a scrap car.

People with learning disabilities can attend an advocacy group provided by the Thera Trust, giving them a voice and empowering them.

In the hands of Sightsavers, a scrap car will stop 10 people from going blind.

My conclusion? A scrap car has the power to change a huge number of lives. Useless doesn’t come into it.

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Everyone has a special place in their hearts for their first car. Usually tiny, old and falling to pieces, it merits a sort of unconditional love. But looking at my M-reg Ford Fiesta, it’s starting to dawn on me that this rickety tin-friend of mine may be past its best. It’s covered in scratches and dents and is rusting badly. The boot doesn’t open, and nor does the bonnet. The clutch doesn’t always work either, meaning that being stuck in reverse on a main road is not an uncommon experience. Then there’s the hole in the exhaust, the temperamental speedometer, and the desperate need for new brake pads. I like to think affectionately that all of this gives my car character. But as the MOT expiry date looms, I’m beginning to realise that my baby might, just might, be verging on the ‘useless’ side and tragically destined for the scrap heap.

However, when you consider that the average scrap car raises £100 for charity, the power it harbours is really quite astounding – and certainly not so tragic. Here are just a few ways in which an old car can make a difference, leaving a legacy to be proud of.

With a scrap car, the Scottish Refugee Council can buy a hot meal for ten families of three who have just fled their county.

At the Rainbow Centre, a scrap car pays for three therapy sessions for children affected by bereavement and life-threatening illness, helping them to come to terms with their grief.

The Venture Trust can use a scrap car to set up two employability sessions, helping young people to write CVs, research jobs, practice interview skills and change their futures.

Reachout! Scotland can use £100 to organise a fantastic adventure or educational trip for their mentees.

A scrap car can provide two days’ worth of hot breakfasts for the 100 guests that visit London City Mission’s centre for the homeless every day.

For the Sambat Trust, a scrap car means that a school library in the Philippines will have 100 new books, enabling children to receive a better education.

Book Aid International can turn a scrap car into 130 new books for a library in Africa.

20 dogs can be fed for an entire week by a scrap car at the Border Collie Trust.

Thanks to a scrap car, a patient will be able to attend Ashgate Hospice’s Palliative day unit once a week, helping to ease their suffering.

Millie’s Trust can train five parents or carers in paediatric first aid thanks to a scrap car.

People with learning disabilities can attend an advocacy group provided by the Thera Trust, giving them a voice and empowering them.

In the hands of Sightsavers, a scrap car will stop 10 people from going blind.

My conclusion? A scrap car has the power to change a huge number of lives. Useless doesn’t come into it.

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Apr
19

Guess the Charity

By admin

Charities Trivia

It’s that time again…Friday Afternoon Fun is here! If you’re in need of some Giveacar-related procrastination material, why not test your charity knowledge with our quick quiz? ...

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We’ve compiled a few random facts about some of our partner charities. Can you guess who we are talking about? (Warning: they may be rather obscure…) We’ll post the answers on Monday. Enjoy!

1. This charity is one of the largest in its sector. It manages more than 120 services in 80 locations around England and Scotland, and employs around 1,100 people.

2. Far back in history, clans formed under the image of the animal this charity protects, and fought wars for the independence of Scotland.

3. Golf is at the heart of healing in this charity. You might also say that they’re ‘heading in the right direction’.

4. This charity boasts some rather glamorous patrons, including the former Chief Executive of River Island, an ITV presenter, and an actor.

5. Are you interested in exploring the fascinating world of insects? These people are – and it doesn’t matter if you’re only just starting out.

6. In 1906, a famous author published a book about a family whose father is falsely accused of espionage. This charity shares its title – but what could that be?

7. ‘Walk the walk’, ‘Stay grounded’ and ‘Stick with what you got’ is some the advice this charity offers us.

8. Which infectious disease kills more children in the UK than any other? This charity supports the ground-breaking research that will help to change that reality.

9. The name of this charity derives from a certain inn, famous for the riots it witnessed in 1969.

10. Once upon a time, in a shed… Something amazing was started in 1974 by a musician and a composer inspired by creativity, but what was it?




Answers

So, how many of these did you guess?

1. Addaction
2. Scottish Wildcats Association
3. On Course Foundation
4. Scope
5. Amateur Entomologists’ Society
6. Railway Children
7. Do The Green Thing
8. Meningitis Research Foundation
9. Stonewall
10. Chickenshed

[summary] => It’s that time again…Friday Afternoon Fun is here! If you’re in need of some Giveacar-related procrastination material, why not test your charity knowledge with our quick quiz? [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>

We’ve compiled a few random facts about some of our partner charities. Can you guess who we are talking about? (Warning: they may be rather obscure…) We’ll post the answers on Monday. Enjoy!

1. This charity is one of the largest in its sector. It manages more than 120 services in 80 locations around England and Scotland, and employs around 1,100 people.

2. Far back in history, clans formed under the image of the animal this charity protects, and fought wars for the independence of Scotland.

3. Golf is at the heart of healing in this charity. You might also say that they’re ‘heading in the right direction’.

4. This charity boasts some rather glamorous patrons, including the former Chief Executive of River Island, an ITV presenter, and an actor.

5. Are you interested in exploring the fascinating world of insects? These people are – and it doesn’t matter if you’re only just starting out.

6. In 1906, a famous author published a book about a family whose father is falsely accused of espionage. This charity shares its title – but what could that be?

7. ‘Walk the walk’, ‘Stay grounded’ and ‘Stick with what you got’ is some the advice this charity offers us.

8. Which infectious disease kills more children in the UK than any other? This charity supports the ground-breaking research that will help to change that reality.

9. The name of this charity derives from a certain inn, famous for the riots it witnessed in 1969.

10. Once upon a time, in a shed… Something amazing was started in 1974 by a musician and a composer inspired by creativity, but what was it?








Answers

So, how many of these did you guess?

1. Addaction


2. Scottish Wildcats Association


3. On Course Foundation


4. Scope


5. Amateur Entomologists’ Society


6. Railway Children


7. Do The Green Thing


8. Meningitis Research Foundation


9. Stonewall


10. Chickenshed

[safe_summary] =>

It’s that time again…Friday Afternoon Fun is here! If you’re in need of some Giveacar-related procrastination material, why not test your charity knowledge with our quick quiz?

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We’ve compiled a few random facts about some of our partner charities. Can you guess who we are talking about? (Warning: they may be rather obscure…) We’ll post the answers on Monday. Enjoy!

1. This charity is one of the largest in its sector. It manages more than 120 services in 80 locations around England and Scotland, and employs around 1,100 people.

2. Far back in history, clans formed under the image of the animal this charity protects, and fought wars for the independence of Scotland.

3. Golf is at the heart of healing in this charity. You might also say that they’re ‘heading in the right direction’.

4. This charity boasts some rather glamorous patrons, including the former Chief Executive of River Island, an ITV presenter, and an actor.

5. Are you interested in exploring the fascinating world of insects? These people are – and it doesn’t matter if you’re only just starting out.

6. In 1906, a famous author published a book about a family whose father is falsely accused of espionage. This charity shares its title – but what could that be?

7. ‘Walk the walk’, ‘Stay grounded’ and ‘Stick with what you got’ is some the advice this charity offers us.

8. Which infectious disease kills more children in the UK than any other? This charity supports the ground-breaking research that will help to change that reality.

9. The name of this charity derives from a certain inn, famous for the riots it witnessed in 1969.

10. Once upon a time, in a shed… Something amazing was started in 1974 by a musician and a composer inspired by creativity, but what was it?




Answers

So, how many of these did you guess?

1. Addaction
2. Scottish Wildcats Association
3. On Course Foundation
4. Scope
5. Amateur Entomologists’ Society
6. Railway Children
7. Do The Green Thing
8. Meningitis Research Foundation
9. Stonewall
10. Chickenshed

[summary] => It’s that time again…Friday Afternoon Fun is here! If you’re in need of some Giveacar-related procrastination material, why not test your charity knowledge with our quick quiz? [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>

We’ve compiled a few random facts about some of our partner charities. Can you guess who we are talking about? (Warning: they may be rather obscure…) We’ll post the answers on Monday. Enjoy!

1. This charity is one of the largest in its sector. It manages more than 120 services in 80 locations around England and Scotland, and employs around 1,100 people.

2. Far back in history, clans formed under the image of the animal this charity protects, and fought wars for the independence of Scotland.

3. Golf is at the heart of healing in this charity. You might also say that they’re ‘heading in the right direction’.

4. This charity boasts some rather glamorous patrons, including the former Chief Executive of River Island, an ITV presenter, and an actor.

5. Are you interested in exploring the fascinating world of insects? These people are – and it doesn’t matter if you’re only just starting out.

6. In 1906, a famous author published a book about a family whose father is falsely accused of espionage. This charity shares its title – but what could that be?

7. ‘Walk the walk’, ‘Stay grounded’ and ‘Stick with what you got’ is some the advice this charity offers us.

8. Which infectious disease kills more children in the UK than any other? This charity supports the ground-breaking research that will help to change that reality.

9. The name of this charity derives from a certain inn, famous for the riots it witnessed in 1969.

10. Once upon a time, in a shed… Something amazing was started in 1974 by a musician and a composer inspired by creativity, but what was it?








Answers

So, how many of these did you guess?

1. Addaction


2. Scottish Wildcats Association


3. On Course Foundation


4. Scope


5. Amateur Entomologists’ Society


6. Railway Children


7. Do The Green Thing


8. Meningitis Research Foundation


9. Stonewall


10. Chickenshed

[safe_summary] =>

It’s that time again…Friday Afternoon Fun is here! If you’re in need of some Giveacar-related procrastination material, why not test your charity knowledge with our quick quiz?

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We’ve compiled a few random facts about some of our partner charities. Can you guess who we are talking about? (Warning: they may be rather obscure…) We’ll post the answers on Monday. Enjoy!

1. This charity is one of the largest in its sector. It manages more than 120 services in 80 locations around England and Scotland, and employs around 1,100 people.

2. Far back in history, clans formed under the image of the animal this charity protects, and fought wars for the independence of Scotland.

3. Golf is at the heart of healing in this charity. You might also say that they’re ‘heading in the right direction’.

4. This charity boasts some rather glamorous patrons, including the former Chief Executive of River Island, an ITV presenter, and an actor.

5. Are you interested in exploring the fascinating world of insects? These people are – and it doesn’t matter if you’re only just starting out.

6. In 1906, a famous author published a book about a family whose father is falsely accused of espionage. This charity shares its title – but what could that be?

7. ‘Walk the walk’, ‘Stay grounded’ and ‘Stick with what you got’ is some the advice this charity offers us.

8. Which infectious disease kills more children in the UK than any other? This charity supports the ground-breaking research that will help to change that reality.

9. The name of this charity derives from a certain inn, famous for the riots it witnessed in 1969.

10. Once upon a time, in a shed… Something amazing was started in 1974 by a musician and a composer inspired by creativity, but what was it?




Answers

So, how many of these did you guess?

1. Addaction
2. Scottish Wildcats Association
3. On Course Foundation
4. Scope
5. Amateur Entomologists’ Society
6. Railway Children
7. Do The Green Thing
8. Meningitis Research Foundation
9. Stonewall
10. Chickenshed

[summary] => It’s that time again…Friday Afternoon Fun is here! If you’re in need of some Giveacar-related procrastination material, why not test your charity knowledge with our quick quiz? [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>

We’ve compiled a few random facts about some of our partner charities. Can you guess who we are talking about? (Warning: they may be rather obscure…) We’ll post the answers on Monday. Enjoy!

1. This charity is one of the largest in its sector. It manages more than 120 services in 80 locations around England and Scotland, and employs around 1,100 people.

2. Far back in history, clans formed under the image of the animal this charity protects, and fought wars for the independence of Scotland.

3. Golf is at the heart of healing in this charity. You might also say that they’re ‘heading in the right direction’.

4. This charity boasts some rather glamorous patrons, including the former Chief Executive of River Island, an ITV presenter, and an actor.

5. Are you interested in exploring the fascinating world of insects? These people are – and it doesn’t matter if you’re only just starting out.

6. In 1906, a famous author published a book about a family whose father is falsely accused of espionage. This charity shares its title – but what could that be?

7. ‘Walk the walk’, ‘Stay grounded’ and ‘Stick with what you got’ is some the advice this charity offers us.

8. Which infectious disease kills more children in the UK than any other? This charity supports the ground-breaking research that will help to change that reality.

9. The name of this charity derives from a certain inn, famous for the riots it witnessed in 1969.

10. Once upon a time, in a shed… Something amazing was started in 1974 by a musician and a composer inspired by creativity, but what was it?








Answers

So, how many of these did you guess?

1. Addaction


2. Scottish Wildcats Association


3. On Course Foundation


4. Scope


5. Amateur Entomologists’ Society


6. Railway Children


7. Do The Green Thing


8. Meningitis Research Foundation


9. Stonewall


10. Chickenshed

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Apr
16

Parkinson's Awareness

By admin

Charities

It's Parkinson's Awareness week. How much do you know? ...

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How long did it take you to put on your shoes this morning? Do you even remember doing it at all? For most people, this action is automatic and requires little or no conscious effort. Yet, as a campaign last December highlighted, everyday tasks like this can become incredibly challenging when suffering from Parkinson’s. Mindful of the 75% of Brits who claim they know little or nothing about the disorder, April 15th to 21st is Parkinson’s Awareness week. So, what is it all about?

The science behind it all

Parkinson’s is a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system. Essentially, this means certain nerve cells in the brain, which produce the hormone dopamine, are killed off. The subsequent lack of dopamine in the body affects the person’s movements, resulting in a number of physical symptoms: tremors, rigidity and slow movements. The disorder also affects moods, sleep patterns and behaviour, and can make facial expressions and speech very difficult. Although these symptoms can be managed with drugs, there is no cure for Parkinson’s.

The disorder has a long history. Symptoms resembling those of Parkinson’s are present in some very early sources: Egyptian writings, traditional Indian medicine, the Bible, and the works of a Roman physician in the 2nd century all make mention of these physical indicators. It wasn’t until 1817, however, that the disorder was studied in depth and named by the English doctor James Parkinson.

Nowadays, Parkinson’s is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder, and another person is diagnosed every hour.

How does it feel to have Parkinson’s?

My best friend’s dad has Parkinson’s. He explains that in the past he has avoided collecting his daughter from school or friends’ houses, afraid that other parents would think he was drunk. He is not alone; many people describe how they have been labelled in this way and subsequently thrown out of places or refused service. If you can’t buy food at the supermarket or get a taxi ride home, where does that leave you? And what about when you are discriminated against in the workplace?

That’s why Parkinson’s UK, the research and support charity, is asking people to empathise with sufferers and put themselves in their shoes this week. They want all of us to spend some time learning about Parkinson’s, so that when we see someone who looks a bit unstable, takes a little longer to count out their change, or struggles to communicate, we don’t stare or jump to negative conclusions. Being patient, asking if you can help, and understanding the concerns of a Parkinson’s sufferer are all essential steps towards changing attitudes and making life a little less difficult.

Some Famous Faces

Muhammah Ali

Bob Hoskins

Michael J Fox

To find out more, visit the Parkinson’s UK website. And remember, you can always support their fantastic work by donating your car.

[summary] => It's Parkinson's Awareness week. How much do you know? [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>



How long did it take you to put on your shoes this morning? Do you even remember doing it at all? For most people, this action is automatic and requires little or no conscious effort. Yet, as a campaign last December highlighted, everyday tasks like this can become incredibly challenging when suffering from Parkinson’s. Mindful of the 75% of Brits who claim they know little or nothing about the disorder, April 15th to 21st is Parkinson’s Awareness week. So, what is it all about?

The science behind it all

Parkinson’s is a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system. Essentially, this means certain nerve cells in the brain, which produce the hormone dopamine, are killed off. The subsequent lack of dopamine in the body affects the person’s movements, resulting in a number of physical symptoms: tremors, rigidity and slow movements. The disorder also affects moods, sleep patterns and behaviour, and can make facial expressions and speech very difficult. Although these symptoms can be managed with drugs, there is no cure for Parkinson’s.

The disorder has a long history. Symptoms resembling those of Parkinson’s are present in some very early sources: Egyptian writings, traditional Indian medicine, the Bible, and the works of a Roman physician in the 2nd century all make mention of these physical indicators. It wasn’t until 1817, however, that the disorder was studied in depth and named by the English doctor James Parkinson.

Nowadays, Parkinson’s is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder, and another person is diagnosed every hour.

How does it feel to have Parkinson’s?

My best friend’s dad has Parkinson’s. He explains that in the past he has avoided collecting his daughter from school or friends’ houses, afraid that other parents would think he was drunk. He is not alone; many people describe how they have been labelled in this way and subsequently thrown out of places or refused service. If you can’t buy food at the supermarket or get a taxi ride home, where does that leave you? And what about when you are discriminated against in the workplace?

That’s why Parkinson’s UK, the research and support charity, is asking people to empathise with sufferers and put themselves in their shoes this week. They want all of us to spend some time learning about Parkinson’s, so that when we see someone who looks a bit unstable, takes a little longer to count out their change, or struggles to communicate, we don’t stare or jump to negative conclusions. Being patient, asking if you can help, and understanding the concerns of a Parkinson’s sufferer are all essential steps towards changing attitudes and making life a little less difficult.

Some Famous Faces

Muhammah Ali


Bob Hoskins

Michael J Fox

To find out more, visit the Parkinson’s UK website. And remember, you can always support their fantastic work by donating your car.

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How long did it take you to put on your shoes this morning? Do you even remember doing it at all? For most people, this action is automatic and requires little or no conscious effort. Yet, as a campaign last December highlighted, everyday tasks like this can become incredibly challenging when suffering from Parkinson’s. Mindful of the 75% of Brits who claim they know little or nothing about the disorder, April 15th to 21st is Parkinson’s Awareness week. So, what is it all about?

The science behind it all

Parkinson’s is a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system. Essentially, this means certain nerve cells in the brain, which produce the hormone dopamine, are killed off. The subsequent lack of dopamine in the body affects the person’s movements, resulting in a number of physical symptoms: tremors, rigidity and slow movements. The disorder also affects moods, sleep patterns and behaviour, and can make facial expressions and speech very difficult. Although these symptoms can be managed with drugs, there is no cure for Parkinson’s.

The disorder has a long history. Symptoms resembling those of Parkinson’s are present in some very early sources: Egyptian writings, traditional Indian medicine, the Bible, and the works of a Roman physician in the 2nd century all make mention of these physical indicators. It wasn’t until 1817, however, that the disorder was studied in depth and named by the English doctor James Parkinson.

Nowadays, Parkinson’s is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder, and another person is diagnosed every hour.

How does it feel to have Parkinson’s?

My best friend’s dad has Parkinson’s. He explains that in the past he has avoided collecting his daughter from school or friends’ houses, afraid that other parents would think he was drunk. He is not alone; many people describe how they have been labelled in this way and subsequently thrown out of places or refused service. If you can’t buy food at the supermarket or get a taxi ride home, where does that leave you? And what about when you are discriminated against in the workplace?

That’s why Parkinson’s UK, the research and support charity, is asking people to empathise with sufferers and put themselves in their shoes this week. They want all of us to spend some time learning about Parkinson’s, so that when we see someone who looks a bit unstable, takes a little longer to count out their change, or struggles to communicate, we don’t stare or jump to negative conclusions. Being patient, asking if you can help, and understanding the concerns of a Parkinson’s sufferer are all essential steps towards changing attitudes and making life a little less difficult.

Some Famous Faces

Muhammah Ali

Bob Hoskins

Michael J Fox

To find out more, visit the Parkinson’s UK website. And remember, you can always support their fantastic work by donating your car.

[summary] => It's Parkinson's Awareness week. How much do you know? [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>



How long did it take you to put on your shoes this morning? Do you even remember doing it at all? For most people, this action is automatic and requires little or no conscious effort. Yet, as a campaign last December highlighted, everyday tasks like this can become incredibly challenging when suffering from Parkinson’s. Mindful of the 75% of Brits who claim they know little or nothing about the disorder, April 15th to 21st is Parkinson’s Awareness week. So, what is it all about?

The science behind it all

Parkinson’s is a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system. Essentially, this means certain nerve cells in the brain, which produce the hormone dopamine, are killed off. The subsequent lack of dopamine in the body affects the person’s movements, resulting in a number of physical symptoms: tremors, rigidity and slow movements. The disorder also affects moods, sleep patterns and behaviour, and can make facial expressions and speech very difficult. Although these symptoms can be managed with drugs, there is no cure for Parkinson’s.

The disorder has a long history. Symptoms resembling those of Parkinson’s are present in some very early sources: Egyptian writings, traditional Indian medicine, the Bible, and the works of a Roman physician in the 2nd century all make mention of these physical indicators. It wasn’t until 1817, however, that the disorder was studied in depth and named by the English doctor James Parkinson.

Nowadays, Parkinson’s is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder, and another person is diagnosed every hour.

How does it feel to have Parkinson’s?

My best friend’s dad has Parkinson’s. He explains that in the past he has avoided collecting his daughter from school or friends’ houses, afraid that other parents would think he was drunk. He is not alone; many people describe how they have been labelled in this way and subsequently thrown out of places or refused service. If you can’t buy food at the supermarket or get a taxi ride home, where does that leave you? And what about when you are discriminated against in the workplace?

That’s why Parkinson’s UK, the research and support charity, is asking people to empathise with sufferers and put themselves in their shoes this week. They want all of us to spend some time learning about Parkinson’s, so that when we see someone who looks a bit unstable, takes a little longer to count out their change, or struggles to communicate, we don’t stare or jump to negative conclusions. Being patient, asking if you can help, and understanding the concerns of a Parkinson’s sufferer are all essential steps towards changing attitudes and making life a little less difficult.

Some Famous Faces

Muhammah Ali


Bob Hoskins

Michael J Fox

To find out more, visit the Parkinson’s UK website. And remember, you can always support their fantastic work by donating your car.

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How long did it take you to put on your shoes this morning? Do you even remember doing it at all? For most people, this action is automatic and requires little or no conscious effort. Yet, as a campaign last December highlighted, everyday tasks like this can become incredibly challenging when suffering from Parkinson’s. Mindful of the 75% of Brits who claim they know little or nothing about the disorder, April 15th to 21st is Parkinson’s Awareness week. So, what is it all about?

The science behind it all

Parkinson’s is a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system. Essentially, this means certain nerve cells in the brain, which produce the hormone dopamine, are killed off. The subsequent lack of dopamine in the body affects the person’s movements, resulting in a number of physical symptoms: tremors, rigidity and slow movements. The disorder also affects moods, sleep patterns and behaviour, and can make facial expressions and speech very difficult. Although these symptoms can be managed with drugs, there is no cure for Parkinson’s.

The disorder has a long history. Symptoms resembling those of Parkinson’s are present in some very early sources: Egyptian writings, traditional Indian medicine, the Bible, and the works of a Roman physician in the 2nd century all make mention of these physical indicators. It wasn’t until 1817, however, that the disorder was studied in depth and named by the English doctor James Parkinson.

Nowadays, Parkinson’s is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder, and another person is diagnosed every hour.

How does it feel to have Parkinson’s?

My best friend’s dad has Parkinson’s. He explains that in the past he has avoided collecting his daughter from school or friends’ houses, afraid that other parents would think he was drunk. He is not alone; many people describe how they have been labelled in this way and subsequently thrown out of places or refused service. If you can’t buy food at the supermarket or get a taxi ride home, where does that leave you? And what about when you are discriminated against in the workplace?

That’s why Parkinson’s UK, the research and support charity, is asking people to empathise with sufferers and put themselves in their shoes this week. They want all of us to spend some time learning about Parkinson’s, so that when we see someone who looks a bit unstable, takes a little longer to count out their change, or struggles to communicate, we don’t stare or jump to negative conclusions. Being patient, asking if you can help, and understanding the concerns of a Parkinson’s sufferer are all essential steps towards changing attitudes and making life a little less difficult.

Some Famous Faces

Muhammah Ali

Bob Hoskins

Michael J Fox

To find out more, visit the Parkinson’s UK website. And remember, you can always support their fantastic work by donating your car.

[summary] => It's Parkinson's Awareness week. How much do you know? [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>



How long did it take you to put on your shoes this morning? Do you even remember doing it at all? For most people, this action is automatic and requires little or no conscious effort. Yet, as a campaign last December highlighted, everyday tasks like this can become incredibly challenging when suffering from Parkinson’s. Mindful of the 75% of Brits who claim they know little or nothing about the disorder, April 15th to 21st is Parkinson’s Awareness week. So, what is it all about?

The science behind it all

Parkinson’s is a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system. Essentially, this means certain nerve cells in the brain, which produce the hormone dopamine, are killed off. The subsequent lack of dopamine in the body affects the person’s movements, resulting in a number of physical symptoms: tremors, rigidity and slow movements. The disorder also affects moods, sleep patterns and behaviour, and can make facial expressions and speech very difficult. Although these symptoms can be managed with drugs, there is no cure for Parkinson’s.

The disorder has a long history. Symptoms resembling those of Parkinson’s are present in some very early sources: Egyptian writings, traditional Indian medicine, the Bible, and the works of a Roman physician in the 2nd century all make mention of these physical indicators. It wasn’t until 1817, however, that the disorder was studied in depth and named by the English doctor James Parkinson.

Nowadays, Parkinson’s is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder, and another person is diagnosed every hour.

How does it feel to have Parkinson’s?

My best friend’s dad has Parkinson’s. He explains that in the past he has avoided collecting his daughter from school or friends’ houses, afraid that other parents would think he was drunk. He is not alone; many people describe how they have been labelled in this way and subsequently thrown out of places or refused service. If you can’t buy food at the supermarket or get a taxi ride home, where does that leave you? And what about when you are discriminated against in the workplace?

That’s why Parkinson’s UK, the research and support charity, is asking people to empathise with sufferers and put themselves in their shoes this week. They want all of us to spend some time learning about Parkinson’s, so that when we see someone who looks a bit unstable, takes a little longer to count out their change, or struggles to communicate, we don’t stare or jump to negative conclusions. Being patient, asking if you can help, and understanding the concerns of a Parkinson’s sufferer are all essential steps towards changing attitudes and making life a little less difficult.

Some Famous Faces

Muhammah Ali


Bob Hoskins

Michael J Fox

To find out more, visit the Parkinson’s UK website. And remember, you can always support their fantastic work by donating your car.

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It's Parkinson's Awareness week. How much do you know?

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Apr
12

Friday Afternoon Fun

By admin

Trivia

It’s Friday afternoon, the weekend is almost within reach, and you just can’t concentrate on your work at all. Why not take a break with our quiz? ...

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Do you know a little bit about UK charities? And a little bit about Giveacar? Or are you just desperate for a little bit of procrastination? Our Friday Afternoon Quiz should do the trick, whatever your excuse. We’ll post the answers on Monday. Good Luck!

1. How many charities are registered in the UK?
2. What is the biggest charity in the UK?
3. What was the first charity to receive a donation from Giveacar?
4. What is the most charitable country in the world? And the least?
5. How much money was donated to charity in the UK last year?
6. What is the most common vehicle donated to Giveacar?
7. Which national newspaper thought Giveacar was a ‘Roadworthy Cause’?
8. What is the oldest charity in Wales?
9. When was the Act of Charitable Uses passed?
10. Which of these cars raised the most money for charity?





Answers

1.According to the Charity Commission, there are over 190,000 charities registered in the UK, and an estimated 110,000 more unregistered ones.
2. Excluding the Gavi Fund and the Arts Council, Cancer Research is the biggest charity in the UK, based its income.
3. The first charity to receive a donation was also Cancer Research UK. The scrap car came from an 85 year old man and raised £50. Little did he know that he was the start of the initiative that would go on to raise over £1million for charity.
4. The most charitable country in the world, according to the Word Giving Index, was Australia. Around 60% of the population engages in charitable behaviour on a regular basis, compared to only 13% in the least charitable countries: Montenegro, Greece and China.
5. Last year, £9.3bn was donated to charities in the UK. This was around £2bn less than in 2011.
6. The most common vehicle donated to Giveacar is the Nissan Micra.
7. The Times described Giveacar as a ‘Roadworthy Cause’ back in 2010.
8. Did you guess this one? According to the charity commission, the oldest charity in Wales is The Laugharne Corporation Lands, dating back to around 1290.
9. The act of charitable uses, forming the basis for the modern definition of charitable purposes, was passed in 1601 under Elizabeth I.
10. The car that raised the most for charity was…the Vauxhall VX 220 (first picture). A grand total of £4,771.88 was donated to the lucky organisation!

[summary] => It’s Friday afternoon, the weekend is almost within reach, and you just can’t concentrate on your work at all. Why not take a break with our quiz? [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>

Do you know a little bit about UK charities? And a little bit about Giveacar? Or are you just desperate for a little bit of procrastination? Our Friday Afternoon Quiz should do the trick, whatever your excuse. We’ll post the answers on Monday. Good Luck!

1. How many charities are registered in the UK?


2. What is the biggest charity in the UK?


3. What was the first charity to receive a donation from Giveacar?


4. What is the most charitable country in the world? And the least?


5. How much money was donated to charity in the UK last year?


6. What is the most common vehicle donated to Giveacar?


7. Which national newspaper thought Giveacar was a ‘Roadworthy Cause’?


8. What is the oldest charity in Wales?


9. When was the Act of Charitable Uses passed?


10. Which of these cars raised the most money for charity?










Answers

1.According to the Charity Commission, there are over 190,000 charities registered in the UK, and an estimated 110,000 more unregistered ones.


2. Excluding the Gavi Fund and the Arts Council, Cancer Research is the biggest charity in the UK, based its income.


3. The first charity to receive a donation was also Cancer Research UK. The scrap car came from an 85 year old man and raised £50. Little did he know that he was the start of the initiative that would go on to raise over £1million for charity.

4. The most charitable country in the world, according to the Word Giving Index, was Australia. Around 60% of the population engages in charitable behaviour on a regular basis, compared to only 13% in the least charitable countries: Montenegro, Greece and China.

5. Last year, £9.3bn was donated to charities in the UK. This was around £2bn less than in 2011.

6. The most common vehicle donated to Giveacar is the Nissan Micra.

7. The Times described Giveacar as a ‘Roadworthy Cause’ back in 2010.

8. Did you guess this one? According to the charity commission, the oldest charity in Wales is The Laugharne Corporation Lands, dating back to around 1290.

9. The act of charitable uses, forming the basis for the modern definition of charitable purposes, was passed in 1601 under Elizabeth I.

10. The car that raised the most for charity was…the Vauxhall VX 220 (first picture). A grand total of £4,771.88 was donated to the lucky organisation!

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Do you know a little bit about UK charities? And a little bit about Giveacar? Or are you just desperate for a little bit of procrastination? Our Friday Afternoon Quiz should do the trick, whatever your excuse. We’ll post the answers on Monday. Good Luck!

1. How many charities are registered in the UK?
2. What is the biggest charity in the UK?
3. What was the first charity to receive a donation from Giveacar?
4. What is the most charitable country in the world? And the least?
5. How much money was donated to charity in the UK last year?
6. What is the most common vehicle donated to Giveacar?
7. Which national newspaper thought Giveacar was a ‘Roadworthy Cause’?
8. What is the oldest charity in Wales?
9. When was the Act of Charitable Uses passed?
10. Which of these cars raised the most money for charity?





Answers

1.According to the Charity Commission, there are over 190,000 charities registered in the UK, and an estimated 110,000 more unregistered ones.
2. Excluding the Gavi Fund and the Arts Council, Cancer Research is the biggest charity in the UK, based its income.
3. The first charity to receive a donation was also Cancer Research UK. The scrap car came from an 85 year old man and raised £50. Little did he know that he was the start of the initiative that would go on to raise over £1million for charity.
4. The most charitable country in the world, according to the Word Giving Index, was Australia. Around 60% of the population engages in charitable behaviour on a regular basis, compared to only 13% in the least charitable countries: Montenegro, Greece and China.
5. Last year, £9.3bn was donated to charities in the UK. This was around £2bn less than in 2011.
6. The most common vehicle donated to Giveacar is the Nissan Micra.
7. The Times described Giveacar as a ‘Roadworthy Cause’ back in 2010.
8. Did you guess this one? According to the charity commission, the oldest charity in Wales is The Laugharne Corporation Lands, dating back to around 1290.
9. The act of charitable uses, forming the basis for the modern definition of charitable purposes, was passed in 1601 under Elizabeth I.
10. The car that raised the most for charity was…the Vauxhall VX 220 (first picture). A grand total of £4,771.88 was donated to the lucky organisation!

[summary] => It’s Friday afternoon, the weekend is almost within reach, and you just can’t concentrate on your work at all. Why not take a break with our quiz? [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>

Do you know a little bit about UK charities? And a little bit about Giveacar? Or are you just desperate for a little bit of procrastination? Our Friday Afternoon Quiz should do the trick, whatever your excuse. We’ll post the answers on Monday. Good Luck!

1. How many charities are registered in the UK?


2. What is the biggest charity in the UK?


3. What was the first charity to receive a donation from Giveacar?


4. What is the most charitable country in the world? And the least?


5. How much money was donated to charity in the UK last year?


6. What is the most common vehicle donated to Giveacar?


7. Which national newspaper thought Giveacar was a ‘Roadworthy Cause’?


8. What is the oldest charity in Wales?


9. When was the Act of Charitable Uses passed?


10. Which of these cars raised the most money for charity?










Answers

1.According to the Charity Commission, there are over 190,000 charities registered in the UK, and an estimated 110,000 more unregistered ones.


2. Excluding the Gavi Fund and the Arts Council, Cancer Research is the biggest charity in the UK, based its income.


3. The first charity to receive a donation was also Cancer Research UK. The scrap car came from an 85 year old man and raised £50. Little did he know that he was the start of the initiative that would go on to raise over £1million for charity.

4. The most charitable country in the world, according to the Word Giving Index, was Australia. Around 60% of the population engages in charitable behaviour on a regular basis, compared to only 13% in the least charitable countries: Montenegro, Greece and China.

5. Last year, £9.3bn was donated to charities in the UK. This was around £2bn less than in 2011.

6. The most common vehicle donated to Giveacar is the Nissan Micra.

7. The Times described Giveacar as a ‘Roadworthy Cause’ back in 2010.

8. Did you guess this one? According to the charity commission, the oldest charity in Wales is The Laugharne Corporation Lands, dating back to around 1290.

9. The act of charitable uses, forming the basis for the modern definition of charitable purposes, was passed in 1601 under Elizabeth I.

10. The car that raised the most for charity was…the Vauxhall VX 220 (first picture). A grand total of £4,771.88 was donated to the lucky organisation!

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It’s Friday afternoon, the weekend is almost within reach, and you just can’t concentrate on your work at all. Why not take a break with our quiz?

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Do you know a little bit about UK charities? And a little bit about Giveacar? Or are you just desperate for a little bit of procrastination? Our Friday Afternoon Quiz should do the trick, whatever your excuse. We’ll post the answers on Monday. Good Luck!

1. How many charities are registered in the UK?
2. What is the biggest charity in the UK?
3. What was the first charity to receive a donation from Giveacar?
4. What is the most charitable country in the world? And the least?
5. How much money was donated to charity in the UK last year?
6. What is the most common vehicle donated to Giveacar?
7. Which national newspaper thought Giveacar was a ‘Roadworthy Cause’?
8. What is the oldest charity in Wales?
9. When was the Act of Charitable Uses passed?
10. Which of these cars raised the most money for charity?





Answers

1.According to the Charity Commission, there are over 190,000 charities registered in the UK, and an estimated 110,000 more unregistered ones.
2. Excluding the Gavi Fund and the Arts Council, Cancer Research is the biggest charity in the UK, based its income.
3. The first charity to receive a donation was also Cancer Research UK. The scrap car came from an 85 year old man and raised £50. Little did he know that he was the start of the initiative that would go on to raise over £1million for charity.
4. The most charitable country in the world, according to the Word Giving Index, was Australia. Around 60% of the population engages in charitable behaviour on a regular basis, compared to only 13% in the least charitable countries: Montenegro, Greece and China.
5. Last year, £9.3bn was donated to charities in the UK. This was around £2bn less than in 2011.
6. The most common vehicle donated to Giveacar is the Nissan Micra.
7. The Times described Giveacar as a ‘Roadworthy Cause’ back in 2010.
8. Did you guess this one? According to the charity commission, the oldest charity in Wales is The Laugharne Corporation Lands, dating back to around 1290.
9. The act of charitable uses, forming the basis for the modern definition of charitable purposes, was passed in 1601 under Elizabeth I.
10. The car that raised the most for charity was…the Vauxhall VX 220 (first picture). A grand total of £4,771.88 was donated to the lucky organisation!

[summary] => It’s Friday afternoon, the weekend is almost within reach, and you just can’t concentrate on your work at all. Why not take a break with our quiz? [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>

Do you know a little bit about UK charities? And a little bit about Giveacar? Or are you just desperate for a little bit of procrastination? Our Friday Afternoon Quiz should do the trick, whatever your excuse. We’ll post the answers on Monday. Good Luck!

1. How many charities are registered in the UK?


2. What is the biggest charity in the UK?


3. What was the first charity to receive a donation from Giveacar?


4. What is the most charitable country in the world? And the least?


5. How much money was donated to charity in the UK last year?


6. What is the most common vehicle donated to Giveacar?


7. Which national newspaper thought Giveacar was a ‘Roadworthy Cause’?


8. What is the oldest charity in Wales?


9. When was the Act of Charitable Uses passed?


10. Which of these cars raised the most money for charity?










Answers

1.According to the Charity Commission, there are over 190,000 charities registered in the UK, and an estimated 110,000 more unregistered ones.


2. Excluding the Gavi Fund and the Arts Council, Cancer Research is the biggest charity in the UK, based its income.


3. The first charity to receive a donation was also Cancer Research UK. The scrap car came from an 85 year old man and raised £50. Little did he know that he was the start of the initiative that would go on to raise over £1million for charity.

4. The most charitable country in the world, according to the Word Giving Index, was Australia. Around 60% of the population engages in charitable behaviour on a regular basis, compared to only 13% in the least charitable countries: Montenegro, Greece and China.

5. Last year, £9.3bn was donated to charities in the UK. This was around £2bn less than in 2011.

6. The most common vehicle donated to Giveacar is the Nissan Micra.

7. The Times described Giveacar as a ‘Roadworthy Cause’ back in 2010.

8. Did you guess this one? According to the charity commission, the oldest charity in Wales is The Laugharne Corporation Lands, dating back to around 1290.

9. The act of charitable uses, forming the basis for the modern definition of charitable purposes, was passed in 1601 under Elizabeth I.

10. The car that raised the most for charity was…the Vauxhall VX 220 (first picture). A grand total of £4,771.88 was donated to the lucky organisation!

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It’s Friday afternoon, the weekend is almost within reach, and you just can’t concentrate on your work at all. Why not take a break with our quiz?

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Mar
26

Purple Day

By admin

Charities Trivia

March 26th is Purple Day. But do you know what this means? Read on to find out ...

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If I told you that today was Purple Day, would you know what it meant? Chances are you wouldn’t have a clue. Without having epilepsy or being close to someone with the condition, it’s easy to cast it off as one of the many issues that exist for some other people in some other place. Yet, with around 3% of people being diagnosed with epilepsy at some point in their lives, chances are that someone you know is or will be affected.

Purple Day is all about increasing awareness of epilepsy, both by wearing purple and by spreading the word. So, with that in mind, we’ve done a bit of research. Turns out it’s really rather interesting, and - you never know - a little bit of knowledge could make a very big difference.

Some fascinating references in history

Some of the earliest recordings of epilepsy are found in a chapter of a Babylonian textbook of medicine, dating back to around 2000BC. Since causes and symptoms could only be explained through the involvement of the supernatural, each type of seizure was associated with the name of a – mostly evil – god or spirit. Such perceptions continued: in the fifteenth century, seizures were a ‘common characteristic of witches’, for example, and the condition has often been referred to as “falling evil”. In many cultures epilepsy has been linked to religious experiences and demonic possession, associations that linger across the world today.

The first book about the condition, written in 400BC by Hippocrates, is considered a major breakthrough in medical history. For the first time epilepsy, then known as the Sacred Disease, was given a natural explanation – to do with phlegm and veins – rather than a supernatural one. It marks a turning point in human thought and perception, and the development of the modern mind. As Hippocrates said, “Men think epilepsy divine merely because they do not understand it […] We will one day understand it, and then cease to call it divine. And so it is with everything in the universe.”

St Valentine – associated by most of us with celebrating love on Valentine’s day – was the patron saint of people with epilepsy throughout the medieval era. Places he had visited became destinations for those hoping for a cure. Bet you didn’t know that!

Intriguing historical mentions aside, what is epilepsy?

In a nutshell, epileptic seizures are caused by an increased amount of electrical activity in the brain. There are several different types of seizure. Perhaps the one that most people think of when ‘epilepsy’ is mentioned is the tonic-clonic seizure, characterised by thrashing movements and convulsions. But seizures can also involve the slumping of the body or the loss of awareness. These can be triggered by a number of different things, from flashing lights to reading to stress, and can happen spontaneously as well.

50 million people worldwide suffer from this condition, and although it can be treated with medication, some people never gain seizure control. Research in 2002 suggested that around 1,000 people in the UK die each year as a result of epilepsy, with 42% of these deaths being preventable.

So, there you go – a few facts that you weren’t aware of before. Since it’s Purple Day, share these with the people around you, and do your bit to increase epilepsy awareness.

For information on what to do if someone around you is having a seizure, type the following into your web browser: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q4C-R52Ffy4&feature=youtu.be

Five Famous People with Epilepsy:

1. Julius Caesar

2. Napoleon

3. Dostoyevsky

4. Gershwin

5. Prince
[summary] => March 26th is Purple Day. But do you know what this means? Read on to find out [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>

If I told you that today was Purple Day, would you know what it meant? Chances are you wouldn’t have a clue. Without having epilepsy or being close to someone with the condition, it’s easy to cast it off as one of the many issues that exist for some other people in some other place. Yet, with around 3% of people being diagnosed with epilepsy at some point in their lives, chances are that someone you know is or will be affected.

Purple Day is all about increasing awareness of epilepsy, both by wearing purple and by spreading the word. So, with that in mind, we’ve done a bit of research. Turns out it’s really rather interesting, and - you never know - a little bit of knowledge could make a very big difference.

Some fascinating references in history

Some of the earliest recordings of epilepsy are found in a chapter of a Babylonian textbook of medicine, dating back to around 2000BC. Since causes and symptoms could only be explained through the involvement of the supernatural, each type of seizure was associated with the name of a – mostly evil – god or spirit. Such perceptions continued: in the fifteenth century, seizures were a ‘common characteristic of witches’, for example, and the condition has often been referred to as “falling evil”. In many cultures epilepsy has been linked to religious experiences and demonic possession, associations that linger across the world today.

The first book about the condition, written in 400BC by Hippocrates, is considered a major breakthrough in medical history. For the first time epilepsy, then known as the Sacred Disease, was given a natural explanation – to do with phlegm and veins – rather than a supernatural one. It marks a turning point in human thought and perception, and the development of the modern mind. As Hippocrates said, “Men think epilepsy divine merely because they do not understand it […] We will one day understand it, and then cease to call it divine. And so it is with everything in the universe.”

St Valentine – associated by most of us with celebrating love on Valentine’s day – was the patron saint of people with epilepsy throughout the medieval era. Places he had visited became destinations for those hoping for a cure. Bet you didn’t know that!

Intriguing historical mentions aside, what is epilepsy?

In a nutshell, epileptic seizures are caused by an increased amount of electrical activity in the brain. There are several different types of seizure. Perhaps the one that most people think of when ‘epilepsy’ is mentioned is the tonic-clonic seizure, characterised by thrashing movements and convulsions. But seizures can also involve the slumping of the body or the loss of awareness. These can be triggered by a number of different things, from flashing lights to reading to stress, and can happen spontaneously as well.

50 million people worldwide suffer from this condition, and although it can be treated with medication, some people never gain seizure control. Research in 2002 suggested that around 1,000 people in the UK die each year as a result of epilepsy, with 42% of these deaths being preventable.

So, there you go – a few facts that you weren’t aware of before. Since it’s Purple Day, share these with the people around you, and do your bit to increase epilepsy awareness.

For information on what to do if someone around you is having a seizure, type the following into your web browser: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q4C-R52Ffy4&feature=youtu.be

Five Famous People with Epilepsy:

1. Julius Caesar





2. Napoleon





3. Dostoyevsky





4. Gershwin





5. Prince


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March 26th is Purple Day. But do you know what this means? Read on to find out

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If I told you that today was Purple Day, would you know what it meant? Chances are you wouldn’t have a clue. Without having epilepsy or being close to someone with the condition, it’s easy to cast it off as one of the many issues that exist for some other people in some other place. Yet, with around 3% of people being diagnosed with epilepsy at some point in their lives, chances are that someone you know is or will be affected.

Purple Day is all about increasing awareness of epilepsy, both by wearing purple and by spreading the word. So, with that in mind, we’ve done a bit of research. Turns out it’s really rather interesting, and - you never know - a little bit of knowledge could make a very big difference.

Some fascinating references in history

Some of the earliest recordings of epilepsy are found in a chapter of a Babylonian textbook of medicine, dating back to around 2000BC. Since causes and symptoms could only be explained through the involvement of the supernatural, each type of seizure was associated with the name of a – mostly evil – god or spirit. Such perceptions continued: in the fifteenth century, seizures were a ‘common characteristic of witches’, for example, and the condition has often been referred to as “falling evil”. In many cultures epilepsy has been linked to religious experiences and demonic possession, associations that linger across the world today.

The first book about the condition, written in 400BC by Hippocrates, is considered a major breakthrough in medical history. For the first time epilepsy, then known as the Sacred Disease, was given a natural explanation – to do with phlegm and veins – rather than a supernatural one. It marks a turning point in human thought and perception, and the development of the modern mind. As Hippocrates said, “Men think epilepsy divine merely because they do not understand it […] We will one day understand it, and then cease to call it divine. And so it is with everything in the universe.”

St Valentine – associated by most of us with celebrating love on Valentine’s day – was the patron saint of people with epilepsy throughout the medieval era. Places he had visited became destinations for those hoping for a cure. Bet you didn’t know that!

Intriguing historical mentions aside, what is epilepsy?

In a nutshell, epileptic seizures are caused by an increased amount of electrical activity in the brain. There are several different types of seizure. Perhaps the one that most people think of when ‘epilepsy’ is mentioned is the tonic-clonic seizure, characterised by thrashing movements and convulsions. But seizures can also involve the slumping of the body or the loss of awareness. These can be triggered by a number of different things, from flashing lights to reading to stress, and can happen spontaneously as well.

50 million people worldwide suffer from this condition, and although it can be treated with medication, some people never gain seizure control. Research in 2002 suggested that around 1,000 people in the UK die each year as a result of epilepsy, with 42% of these deaths being preventable.

So, there you go – a few facts that you weren’t aware of before. Since it’s Purple Day, share these with the people around you, and do your bit to increase epilepsy awareness.

For information on what to do if someone around you is having a seizure, type the following into your web browser: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q4C-R52Ffy4&feature=youtu.be

Five Famous People with Epilepsy:

1. Julius Caesar

2. Napoleon

3. Dostoyevsky

4. Gershwin

5. Prince
[summary] => March 26th is Purple Day. But do you know what this means? Read on to find out [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>

If I told you that today was Purple Day, would you know what it meant? Chances are you wouldn’t have a clue. Without having epilepsy or being close to someone with the condition, it’s easy to cast it off as one of the many issues that exist for some other people in some other place. Yet, with around 3% of people being diagnosed with epilepsy at some point in their lives, chances are that someone you know is or will be affected.

Purple Day is all about increasing awareness of epilepsy, both by wearing purple and by spreading the word. So, with that in mind, we’ve done a bit of research. Turns out it’s really rather interesting, and - you never know - a little bit of knowledge could make a very big difference.

Some fascinating references in history

Some of the earliest recordings of epilepsy are found in a chapter of a Babylonian textbook of medicine, dating back to around 2000BC. Since causes and symptoms could only be explained through the involvement of the supernatural, each type of seizure was associated with the name of a – mostly evil – god or spirit. Such perceptions continued: in the fifteenth century, seizures were a ‘common characteristic of witches’, for example, and the condition has often been referred to as “falling evil”. In many cultures epilepsy has been linked to religious experiences and demonic possession, associations that linger across the world today.

The first book about the condition, written in 400BC by Hippocrates, is considered a major breakthrough in medical history. For the first time epilepsy, then known as the Sacred Disease, was given a natural explanation – to do with phlegm and veins – rather than a supernatural one. It marks a turning point in human thought and perception, and the development of the modern mind. As Hippocrates said, “Men think epilepsy divine merely because they do not understand it […] We will one day understand it, and then cease to call it divine. And so it is with everything in the universe.”

St Valentine – associated by most of us with celebrating love on Valentine’s day – was the patron saint of people with epilepsy throughout the medieval era. Places he had visited became destinations for those hoping for a cure. Bet you didn’t know that!

Intriguing historical mentions aside, what is epilepsy?

In a nutshell, epileptic seizures are caused by an increased amount of electrical activity in the brain. There are several different types of seizure. Perhaps the one that most people think of when ‘epilepsy’ is mentioned is the tonic-clonic seizure, characterised by thrashing movements and convulsions. But seizures can also involve the slumping of the body or the loss of awareness. These can be triggered by a number of different things, from flashing lights to reading to stress, and can happen spontaneously as well.

50 million people worldwide suffer from this condition, and although it can be treated with medication, some people never gain seizure control. Research in 2002 suggested that around 1,000 people in the UK die each year as a result of epilepsy, with 42% of these deaths being preventable.

So, there you go – a few facts that you weren’t aware of before. Since it’s Purple Day, share these with the people around you, and do your bit to increase epilepsy awareness.

For information on what to do if someone around you is having a seizure, type the following into your web browser: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q4C-R52Ffy4&feature=youtu.be

Five Famous People with Epilepsy:

1. Julius Caesar





2. Napoleon





3. Dostoyevsky





4. Gershwin





5. Prince


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If I told you that today was Purple Day, would you know what it meant? Chances are you wouldn’t have a clue. Without having epilepsy or being close to someone with the condition, it’s easy to cast it off as one of the many issues that exist for some other people in some other place. Yet, with around 3% of people being diagnosed with epilepsy at some point in their lives, chances are that someone you know is or will be affected.

Purple Day is all about increasing awareness of epilepsy, both by wearing purple and by spreading the word. So, with that in mind, we’ve done a bit of research. Turns out it’s really rather interesting, and - you never know - a little bit of knowledge could make a very big difference.

Some fascinating references in history

Some of the earliest recordings of epilepsy are found in a chapter of a Babylonian textbook of medicine, dating back to around 2000BC. Since causes and symptoms could only be explained through the involvement of the supernatural, each type of seizure was associated with the name of a – mostly evil – god or spirit. Such perceptions continued: in the fifteenth century, seizures were a ‘common characteristic of witches’, for example, and the condition has often been referred to as “falling evil”. In many cultures epilepsy has been linked to religious experiences and demonic possession, associations that linger across the world today.

The first book about the condition, written in 400BC by Hippocrates, is considered a major breakthrough in medical history. For the first time epilepsy, then known as the Sacred Disease, was given a natural explanation – to do with phlegm and veins – rather than a supernatural one. It marks a turning point in human thought and perception, and the development of the modern mind. As Hippocrates said, “Men think epilepsy divine merely because they do not understand it […] We will one day understand it, and then cease to call it divine. And so it is with everything in the universe.”

St Valentine – associated by most of us with celebrating love on Valentine’s day – was the patron saint of people with epilepsy throughout the medieval era. Places he had visited became destinations for those hoping for a cure. Bet you didn’t know that!

Intriguing historical mentions aside, what is epilepsy?

In a nutshell, epileptic seizures are caused by an increased amount of electrical activity in the brain. There are several different types of seizure. Perhaps the one that most people think of when ‘epilepsy’ is mentioned is the tonic-clonic seizure, characterised by thrashing movements and convulsions. But seizures can also involve the slumping of the body or the loss of awareness. These can be triggered by a number of different things, from flashing lights to reading to stress, and can happen spontaneously as well.

50 million people worldwide suffer from this condition, and although it can be treated with medication, some people never gain seizure control. Research in 2002 suggested that around 1,000 people in the UK die each year as a result of epilepsy, with 42% of these deaths being preventable.

So, there you go – a few facts that you weren’t aware of before. Since it’s Purple Day, share these with the people around you, and do your bit to increase epilepsy awareness.

For information on what to do if someone around you is having a seizure, type the following into your web browser: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q4C-R52Ffy4&feature=youtu.be

Five Famous People with Epilepsy:

1. Julius Caesar

2. Napoleon

3. Dostoyevsky

4. Gershwin

5. Prince
[summary] => March 26th is Purple Day. But do you know what this means? Read on to find out [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>

If I told you that today was Purple Day, would you know what it meant? Chances are you wouldn’t have a clue. Without having epilepsy or being close to someone with the condition, it’s easy to cast it off as one of the many issues that exist for some other people in some other place. Yet, with around 3% of people being diagnosed with epilepsy at some point in their lives, chances are that someone you know is or will be affected.

Purple Day is all about increasing awareness of epilepsy, both by wearing purple and by spreading the word. So, with that in mind, we’ve done a bit of research. Turns out it’s really rather interesting, and - you never know - a little bit of knowledge could make a very big difference.

Some fascinating references in history

Some of the earliest recordings of epilepsy are found in a chapter of a Babylonian textbook of medicine, dating back to around 2000BC. Since causes and symptoms could only be explained through the involvement of the supernatural, each type of seizure was associated with the name of a – mostly evil – god or spirit. Such perceptions continued: in the fifteenth century, seizures were a ‘common characteristic of witches’, for example, and the condition has often been referred to as “falling evil”. In many cultures epilepsy has been linked to religious experiences and demonic possession, associations that linger across the world today.

The first book about the condition, written in 400BC by Hippocrates, is considered a major breakthrough in medical history. For the first time epilepsy, then known as the Sacred Disease, was given a natural explanation – to do with phlegm and veins – rather than a supernatural one. It marks a turning point in human thought and perception, and the development of the modern mind. As Hippocrates said, “Men think epilepsy divine merely because they do not understand it […] We will one day understand it, and then cease to call it divine. And so it is with everything in the universe.”

St Valentine – associated by most of us with celebrating love on Valentine’s day – was the patron saint of people with epilepsy throughout the medieval era. Places he had visited became destinations for those hoping for a cure. Bet you didn’t know that!

Intriguing historical mentions aside, what is epilepsy?

In a nutshell, epileptic seizures are caused by an increased amount of electrical activity in the brain. There are several different types of seizure. Perhaps the one that most people think of when ‘epilepsy’ is mentioned is the tonic-clonic seizure, characterised by thrashing movements and convulsions. But seizures can also involve the slumping of the body or the loss of awareness. These can be triggered by a number of different things, from flashing lights to reading to stress, and can happen spontaneously as well.

50 million people worldwide suffer from this condition, and although it can be treated with medication, some people never gain seizure control. Research in 2002 suggested that around 1,000 people in the UK die each year as a result of epilepsy, with 42% of these deaths being preventable.

So, there you go – a few facts that you weren’t aware of before. Since it’s Purple Day, share these with the people around you, and do your bit to increase epilepsy awareness.

For information on what to do if someone around you is having a seizure, type the following into your web browser: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q4C-R52Ffy4&feature=youtu.be

Five Famous People with Epilepsy:

1. Julius Caesar





2. Napoleon





3. Dostoyevsky





4. Gershwin





5. Prince


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Mar
22

World Water Day

By admin

Ever stopped to think about what clean water means for you? ...

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It’s always amazing how much we take for granted in this country. When I got up this morning, I went through my usual routine: I had a hot shower, and thought nothing of it; on the way to work I popped into a local shop, bought a couple of bottles of water, and thought nothing of it; at work I filled the kettle from the tap in the kitchen and again, thought nothing of it. But today is different: it’s World Water Day. The idea behind this? To prompt us to contemplate some of the more shocking truths about this seemingly plentiful resource that is available to many of us at the twist of a tap.

Shockingly, over 780 million people have no way of acquiring clean water, and almost two fifths of the world’s population don’t have access to adequate sanitation. The effects extend far beyond the obvious: not only does this mean that between 6 and 8 million people die each year from water-related diseases and disasters, or suffer hunger because there isn’t enough water to grow crops. It also means that women, in walking long distances to fetch water, are exposed to rape and abuse. The time they spend making these journeys condemns them to a life of supporting their households, and does little to encourage social changes and empowerment. Children are denied the opportunity to improve their situation in life through education, because they must fetch water instead. And hospitals are burdened with treating easily preventable diseases, instead of spending time and resources elsewhere.

Those are the reasons that charities such as Water Aid and FRANK Water dedicate their efforts to making safe water and basic sanitation available. Their methods can be as simple as providing filtering systems, or as complex as persuading governments to commit to making changes. The importance of all this, whatever the means, is undeniable.

So take a moment today to stop and think about what clean water means for you. And at the same time, consider the ways that you could help change this for others. Pledging your vehicle through Giveacar to a water-related charity is just one of many.

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It’s always amazing how much we take for granted in this country. When I got up this morning, I went through my usual routine: I had a hot shower, and thought nothing of it; on the way to work I popped into a local shop, bought a couple of bottles of water, and thought nothing of it; at work I filled the kettle from the tap in the kitchen and again, thought nothing of it. But today is different: it’s World Water Day. The idea behind this? To prompt us to contemplate some of the more shocking truths about this seemingly plentiful resource that is available to many of us at the twist of a tap.
Shockingly, over 780 million people have no way of acquiring clean water, and almost two fifths of the world’s population don’t have access to adequate sanitation. The effects extend far beyond the obvious: not only does this mean that between 6 and 8 million people die each year from water-related diseases and disasters, or suffer hunger because there isn’t enough water to grow crops. It also means that women, in walking long distances to fetch water, are exposed to rape and abuse. The time they spend making these journeys condemns them to a life of supporting their households, and does little to encourage social changes and empowerment. Children are denied the opportunity to improve their situation in life through education, because they must fetch water instead. And hospitals are burdened with treating easily preventable diseases, instead of spending time and resources elsewhere.
Those are the reasons that charities such as Water Aid and FRANK Water dedicate their efforts to making safe water and basic sanitation available. Their methods can be as simple as providing filtering systems, or as complex as persuading governments to commit to making changes. The importance of all this, whatever the means, is undeniable.
So take a moment today to stop and think about what clean water means for you. And at the same time, consider the ways that you could help change this for others. Pledging your vehicle through Giveacar to a water-related charity is just one of many.

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It’s always amazing how much we take for granted in this country. When I got up this morning, I went through my usual routine: I had a hot shower, and thought nothing of it; on the way to work I popped into a local shop, bought a couple of bottles of water, and thought nothing of it; at work I filled the kettle from the tap in the kitchen and again, thought nothing of it. But today is different: it’s World Water Day. The idea behind this? To prompt us to contemplate some of the more shocking truths about this seemingly plentiful resource that is available to many of us at the twist of a tap.

Shockingly, over 780 million people have no way of acquiring clean water, and almost two fifths of the world’s population don’t have access to adequate sanitation. The effects extend far beyond the obvious: not only does this mean that between 6 and 8 million people die each year from water-related diseases and disasters, or suffer hunger because there isn’t enough water to grow crops. It also means that women, in walking long distances to fetch water, are exposed to rape and abuse. The time they spend making these journeys condemns them to a life of supporting their households, and does little to encourage social changes and empowerment. Children are denied the opportunity to improve their situation in life through education, because they must fetch water instead. And hospitals are burdened with treating easily preventable diseases, instead of spending time and resources elsewhere.

Those are the reasons that charities such as Water Aid and FRANK Water dedicate their efforts to making safe water and basic sanitation available. Their methods can be as simple as providing filtering systems, or as complex as persuading governments to commit to making changes. The importance of all this, whatever the means, is undeniable.

So take a moment today to stop and think about what clean water means for you. And at the same time, consider the ways that you could help change this for others. Pledging your vehicle through Giveacar to a water-related charity is just one of many.

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It’s always amazing how much we take for granted in this country. When I got up this morning, I went through my usual routine: I had a hot shower, and thought nothing of it; on the way to work I popped into a local shop, bought a couple of bottles of water, and thought nothing of it; at work I filled the kettle from the tap in the kitchen and again, thought nothing of it. But today is different: it’s World Water Day. The idea behind this? To prompt us to contemplate some of the more shocking truths about this seemingly plentiful resource that is available to many of us at the twist of a tap.
Shockingly, over 780 million people have no way of acquiring clean water, and almost two fifths of the world’s population don’t have access to adequate sanitation. The effects extend far beyond the obvious: not only does this mean that between 6 and 8 million people die each year from water-related diseases and disasters, or suffer hunger because there isn’t enough water to grow crops. It also means that women, in walking long distances to fetch water, are exposed to rape and abuse. The time they spend making these journeys condemns them to a life of supporting their households, and does little to encourage social changes and empowerment. Children are denied the opportunity to improve their situation in life through education, because they must fetch water instead. And hospitals are burdened with treating easily preventable diseases, instead of spending time and resources elsewhere.
Those are the reasons that charities such as Water Aid and FRANK Water dedicate their efforts to making safe water and basic sanitation available. Their methods can be as simple as providing filtering systems, or as complex as persuading governments to commit to making changes. The importance of all this, whatever the means, is undeniable.
So take a moment today to stop and think about what clean water means for you. And at the same time, consider the ways that you could help change this for others. Pledging your vehicle through Giveacar to a water-related charity is just one of many.

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Mar
18

Beating the Blues

By admin

Trivia

Monday morning blues? Read on for our tips on how to brighten up your day. ...

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(Yes, we noticed the annoying lack of apostrophe in ‘its’ as well. Ugh.)
Image from exiledpreacher.blogspot.co.uk

According to scientific research carried out at the Stony Brook University, there’s no evidence of people’s moods being worse on a Monday when compared with any other day of the week. You may, however, beg to differ. As the shrill shriek of your alarm pierces your peaceful sleeping bliss in the early hours of a dark, miserable Monday morning, it’s impossible not to resent the prospect of emerging from your cosy bed-nest and facing the slog ahead. (Especially if, in a desperate attempt to prolong the weekend, you stayed up far too late and drank far too much on Sunday evening...) But, all is not lost! We have a few tried-and-tested suggestions that will brighten your mood and bring a smile – or perhaps even a hint of laughter – to your face:

1. Wear your favourite outfit. Being comfortable and feeling like you look fabulous is a great way to lift your mood.

2. Treat yourself to an extra-tasty coffee and breakfast on the way to work. Starting off like this will set a positive tone for the rest of the day.

3. Catch the eye of everybody you walk past and smile. You’ll notice how you instantly assume that those who smile back are just lovely people. When you realise that they are thinking the same about you, you’ll smile even more. (Note: don’t stare at people and grin uncontrollably. They will just think you are strange.)

4. When you get to work, imagine your to-do list looking something like this:

5. Give somebody a compliment. It’s funny how doing this makes you feel so positive. (And if they adhere to British codes of politeness, they’ll compliment you back.)

6. Try something for lunch that you’ve never eaten before. An added bit of excitement can never go amiss.

7. Learn something new – preferably something that makes you say, ‘Cool, I never knew that. How fascinating.’

8. Watch a funny video on youtube. Searching ‘funny video’ or ‘funny animal clips’ never fails, but go with whatever it is that makes you chuckle.

9. Send an unexpected text to that person you keep meaning to get in touch with again, but just never have time to. Chances are you’ll have a great catch-up very soon.

10. And last but, in no way whatsoever, least: pledge your car to charity right here on our website (www.giveacar.co.uk/pledgeyourcar). It’s quick and easy, costs you nothing at all, and you come away glowing inside with the satisfaction of having done something good today. What could be better? ‘The chance of winning an Amazon Kindle Fire’ I hear you say. Well, pledge your car and you get that too.

Before you know it, you will have had a brilliant Monday.

[summary] => Monday morning blues? Read on for our tips on how to brighten up your day. [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>

(Yes, we noticed the annoying lack of apostrophe in ‘its’ as well. Ugh.)

Image from exiledpreacher.blogspot.co.uk

According to scientific research carried out at the Stony Brook University, there’s no evidence of people’s moods being worse on a Monday when compared with any other day of the week. You may, however, beg to differ. As the shrill shriek of your alarm pierces your peaceful sleeping bliss in the early hours of a dark, miserable Monday morning, it’s impossible not to resent the prospect of emerging from your cosy bed-nest and facing the slog ahead. (Especially if, in a desperate attempt to prolong the weekend, you stayed up far too late and drank far too much on Sunday evening...) But, all is not lost! We have a few tried-and-tested suggestions that will brighten your mood and bring a smile – or perhaps even a hint of laughter – to your face:

1. Wear your favourite outfit. Being comfortable and feeling like you look fabulous is a great way to lift your mood.

2. Treat yourself to an extra-tasty coffee and breakfast on the way to work. Starting off like this will set a positive tone for the rest of the day.

3. Catch the eye of everybody you walk past and smile. You’ll notice how you instantly assume that those who smile back are just lovely people. When you realise that they are thinking the same about you, you’ll smile even more. (Note: don’t stare at people and grin uncontrollably. They will just think you are strange.)

4. When you get to work, imagine your to-do list looking something like this:

5. Give somebody a compliment. It’s funny how doing this makes you feel so positive. (And if they adhere to British codes of politeness, they’ll compliment you back.)

6. Try something for lunch that you’ve never eaten before. An added bit of excitement can never go amiss.

7. Learn something new – preferably something that makes you say, ‘Cool, I never knew that. How fascinating.’

8. Watch a funny video on youtube. Searching ‘funny video’ or ‘funny animal clips’ never fails, but go with whatever it is that makes you chuckle.

9. Send an unexpected text to that person you keep meaning to get in touch with again, but just never have time to. Chances are you’ll have a great catch-up very soon.

10. And last but, in no way whatsoever, least: pledge your car to charity right here on our website (www.giveacar.co.uk/pledgeyourcar). It’s quick and easy, costs you nothing at all, and you come away glowing inside with the satisfaction of having done something good today. What could be better? ‘The chance of winning an Amazon Kindle Fire’ I hear you say. Well, pledge your car and you get that too.

Before you know it, you will have had a brilliant Monday.

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Monday morning blues? Read on for our tips on how to brighten up your day.

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(Yes, we noticed the annoying lack of apostrophe in ‘its’ as well. Ugh.)
Image from exiledpreacher.blogspot.co.uk

According to scientific research carried out at the Stony Brook University, there’s no evidence of people’s moods being worse on a Monday when compared with any other day of the week. You may, however, beg to differ. As the shrill shriek of your alarm pierces your peaceful sleeping bliss in the early hours of a dark, miserable Monday morning, it’s impossible not to resent the prospect of emerging from your cosy bed-nest and facing the slog ahead. (Especially if, in a desperate attempt to prolong the weekend, you stayed up far too late and drank far too much on Sunday evening...) But, all is not lost! We have a few tried-and-tested suggestions that will brighten your mood and bring a smile – or perhaps even a hint of laughter – to your face:

1. Wear your favourite outfit. Being comfortable and feeling like you look fabulous is a great way to lift your mood.

2. Treat yourself to an extra-tasty coffee and breakfast on the way to work. Starting off like this will set a positive tone for the rest of the day.

3. Catch the eye of everybody you walk past and smile. You’ll notice how you instantly assume that those who smile back are just lovely people. When you realise that they are thinking the same about you, you’ll smile even more. (Note: don’t stare at people and grin uncontrollably. They will just think you are strange.)

4. When you get to work, imagine your to-do list looking something like this:

5. Give somebody a compliment. It’s funny how doing this makes you feel so positive. (And if they adhere to British codes of politeness, they’ll compliment you back.)

6. Try something for lunch that you’ve never eaten before. An added bit of excitement can never go amiss.

7. Learn something new – preferably something that makes you say, ‘Cool, I never knew that. How fascinating.’

8. Watch a funny video on youtube. Searching ‘funny video’ or ‘funny animal clips’ never fails, but go with whatever it is that makes you chuckle.

9. Send an unexpected text to that person you keep meaning to get in touch with again, but just never have time to. Chances are you’ll have a great catch-up very soon.

10. And last but, in no way whatsoever, least: pledge your car to charity right here on our website (www.giveacar.co.uk/pledgeyourcar). It’s quick and easy, costs you nothing at all, and you come away glowing inside with the satisfaction of having done something good today. What could be better? ‘The chance of winning an Amazon Kindle Fire’ I hear you say. Well, pledge your car and you get that too.

Before you know it, you will have had a brilliant Monday.

[summary] => Monday morning blues? Read on for our tips on how to brighten up your day. [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>

(Yes, we noticed the annoying lack of apostrophe in ‘its’ as well. Ugh.)

Image from exiledpreacher.blogspot.co.uk

According to scientific research carried out at the Stony Brook University, there’s no evidence of people’s moods being worse on a Monday when compared with any other day of the week. You may, however, beg to differ. As the shrill shriek of your alarm pierces your peaceful sleeping bliss in the early hours of a dark, miserable Monday morning, it’s impossible not to resent the prospect of emerging from your cosy bed-nest and facing the slog ahead. (Especially if, in a desperate attempt to prolong the weekend, you stayed up far too late and drank far too much on Sunday evening...) But, all is not lost! We have a few tried-and-tested suggestions that will brighten your mood and bring a smile – or perhaps even a hint of laughter – to your face:

1. Wear your favourite outfit. Being comfortable and feeling like you look fabulous is a great way to lift your mood.

2. Treat yourself to an extra-tasty coffee and breakfast on the way to work. Starting off like this will set a positive tone for the rest of the day.

3. Catch the eye of everybody you walk past and smile. You’ll notice how you instantly assume that those who smile back are just lovely people. When you realise that they are thinking the same about you, you’ll smile even more. (Note: don’t stare at people and grin uncontrollably. They will just think you are strange.)

4. When you get to work, imagine your to-do list looking something like this:

5. Give somebody a compliment. It’s funny how doing this makes you feel so positive. (And if they adhere to British codes of politeness, they’ll compliment you back.)

6. Try something for lunch that you’ve never eaten before. An added bit of excitement can never go amiss.

7. Learn something new – preferably something that makes you say, ‘Cool, I never knew that. How fascinating.’

8. Watch a funny video on youtube. Searching ‘funny video’ or ‘funny animal clips’ never fails, but go with whatever it is that makes you chuckle.

9. Send an unexpected text to that person you keep meaning to get in touch with again, but just never have time to. Chances are you’ll have a great catch-up very soon.

10. And last but, in no way whatsoever, least: pledge your car to charity right here on our website (www.giveacar.co.uk/pledgeyourcar). It’s quick and easy, costs you nothing at all, and you come away glowing inside with the satisfaction of having done something good today. What could be better? ‘The chance of winning an Amazon Kindle Fire’ I hear you say. Well, pledge your car and you get that too.

Before you know it, you will have had a brilliant Monday.

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(Yes, we noticed the annoying lack of apostrophe in ‘its’ as well. Ugh.)
Image from exiledpreacher.blogspot.co.uk

According to scientific research carried out at the Stony Brook University, there’s no evidence of people’s moods being worse on a Monday when compared with any other day of the week. You may, however, beg to differ. As the shrill shriek of your alarm pierces your peaceful sleeping bliss in the early hours of a dark, miserable Monday morning, it’s impossible not to resent the prospect of emerging from your cosy bed-nest and facing the slog ahead. (Especially if, in a desperate attempt to prolong the weekend, you stayed up far too late and drank far too much on Sunday evening...) But, all is not lost! We have a few tried-and-tested suggestions that will brighten your mood and bring a smile – or perhaps even a hint of laughter – to your face:

1. Wear your favourite outfit. Being comfortable and feeling like you look fabulous is a great way to lift your mood.

2. Treat yourself to an extra-tasty coffee and breakfast on the way to work. Starting off like this will set a positive tone for the rest of the day.

3. Catch the eye of everybody you walk past and smile. You’ll notice how you instantly assume that those who smile back are just lovely people. When you realise that they are thinking the same about you, you’ll smile even more. (Note: don’t stare at people and grin uncontrollably. They will just think you are strange.)

4. When you get to work, imagine your to-do list looking something like this:

5. Give somebody a compliment. It’s funny how doing this makes you feel so positive. (And if they adhere to British codes of politeness, they’ll compliment you back.)

6. Try something for lunch that you’ve never eaten before. An added bit of excitement can never go amiss.

7. Learn something new – preferably something that makes you say, ‘Cool, I never knew that. How fascinating.’

8. Watch a funny video on youtube. Searching ‘funny video’ or ‘funny animal clips’ never fails, but go with whatever it is that makes you chuckle.

9. Send an unexpected text to that person you keep meaning to get in touch with again, but just never have time to. Chances are you’ll have a great catch-up very soon.

10. And last but, in no way whatsoever, least: pledge your car to charity right here on our website (www.giveacar.co.uk/pledgeyourcar). It’s quick and easy, costs you nothing at all, and you come away glowing inside with the satisfaction of having done something good today. What could be better? ‘The chance of winning an Amazon Kindle Fire’ I hear you say. Well, pledge your car and you get that too.

Before you know it, you will have had a brilliant Monday.

[summary] => Monday morning blues? Read on for our tips on how to brighten up your day. [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>

(Yes, we noticed the annoying lack of apostrophe in ‘its’ as well. Ugh.)

Image from exiledpreacher.blogspot.co.uk

According to scientific research carried out at the Stony Brook University, there’s no evidence of people’s moods being worse on a Monday when compared with any other day of the week. You may, however, beg to differ. As the shrill shriek of your alarm pierces your peaceful sleeping bliss in the early hours of a dark, miserable Monday morning, it’s impossible not to resent the prospect of emerging from your cosy bed-nest and facing the slog ahead. (Especially if, in a desperate attempt to prolong the weekend, you stayed up far too late and drank far too much on Sunday evening...) But, all is not lost! We have a few tried-and-tested suggestions that will brighten your mood and bring a smile – or perhaps even a hint of laughter – to your face:

1. Wear your favourite outfit. Being comfortable and feeling like you look fabulous is a great way to lift your mood.

2. Treat yourself to an extra-tasty coffee and breakfast on the way to work. Starting off like this will set a positive tone for the rest of the day.

3. Catch the eye of everybody you walk past and smile. You’ll notice how you instantly assume that those who smile back are just lovely people. When you realise that they are thinking the same about you, you’ll smile even more. (Note: don’t stare at people and grin uncontrollably. They will just think you are strange.)

4. When you get to work, imagine your to-do list looking something like this:

5. Give somebody a compliment. It’s funny how doing this makes you feel so positive. (And if they adhere to British codes of politeness, they’ll compliment you back.)

6. Try something for lunch that you’ve never eaten before. An added bit of excitement can never go amiss.

7. Learn something new – preferably something that makes you say, ‘Cool, I never knew that. How fascinating.’

8. Watch a funny video on youtube. Searching ‘funny video’ or ‘funny animal clips’ never fails, but go with whatever it is that makes you chuckle.

9. Send an unexpected text to that person you keep meaning to get in touch with again, but just never have time to. Chances are you’ll have a great catch-up very soon.

10. And last but, in no way whatsoever, least: pledge your car to charity right here on our website (www.giveacar.co.uk/pledgeyourcar). It’s quick and easy, costs you nothing at all, and you come away glowing inside with the satisfaction of having done something good today. What could be better? ‘The chance of winning an Amazon Kindle Fire’ I hear you say. Well, pledge your car and you get that too.

Before you know it, you will have had a brilliant Monday.

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Monday morning blues? Read on for our tips on how to brighten up your day.

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Mar
12

Weird and Crazy Cars

By admin

Trivia

What's the weirdest looking car you've ever seen? Take a look at these ...

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Sitting in the office on a grey afternoon and facing the fearsome prospect of having to brave the biting wintry weather that seems to have replaced our much-awaited spring, I felt the need for a little amusement. What better way to forget these woes than by scouring the internet for ‘weird cars’? I asked myself. The results were entertaining, fascinating, and - at times - frankly disturbing. The search turned up this gem: Villageofjoy’s 50 weird and crazy cars , where I can guarantee you will find some of the strangest vehicles to have ever cruised this planet. (A few personal favourites below.) I wonder, how much money would these cars raise for charity?

Most disturbing...

(Image: Elmer Presslee)

Because I have Game of Thrones on the mind...


(Image: groovehouse)

Om nom nom...

(Image: Rodny Dioxin)

Plain weird...

(Image: Archie McPhee Seattle)

Wish I could make sandcastles like this...

(Image: SantiMB)

Puts a smile on your face...

(Image: caffeineslinger)

[summary] => What's the weirdest looking car you've ever seen? Take a look at these [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>

Sitting in the office on a grey afternoon and facing the fearsome prospect of having to brave the biting wintry weather that seems to have replaced our much-awaited spring, I felt the need for a little amusement. What better way to forget these woes than by scouring the internet for ‘weird cars’? I asked myself. The results were entertaining, fascinating, and - at times - frankly disturbing. The search turned up this gem: Villageofjoy’s 50 weird and crazy cars , where I can guarantee you will find some of the strangest vehicles to have ever cruised this planet. (A few personal favourites below.) I wonder, how much money would these cars raise for charity?

Most disturbing...





(Image: Elmer Presslee)

Because I have Game of Thrones on the mind...





(Image: groovehouse)

Om nom nom...





(Image: Rodny Dioxin)

Plain weird...





(Image: Archie McPhee Seattle)

Wish I could make sandcastles like this...





(Image: SantiMB)

Puts a smile on your face...





(Image: caffeineslinger)

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What's the weirdest looking car you've ever seen? Take a look at these

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Sitting in the office on a grey afternoon and facing the fearsome prospect of having to brave the biting wintry weather that seems to have replaced our much-awaited spring, I felt the need for a little amusement. What better way to forget these woes than by scouring the internet for ‘weird cars’? I asked myself. The results were entertaining, fascinating, and - at times - frankly disturbing. The search turned up this gem: Villageofjoy’s 50 weird and crazy cars , where I can guarantee you will find some of the strangest vehicles to have ever cruised this planet. (A few personal favourites below.) I wonder, how much money would these cars raise for charity?

Most disturbing...

(Image: Elmer Presslee)

Because I have Game of Thrones on the mind...


(Image: groovehouse)

Om nom nom...

(Image: Rodny Dioxin)

Plain weird...

(Image: Archie McPhee Seattle)

Wish I could make sandcastles like this...

(Image: SantiMB)

Puts a smile on your face...

(Image: caffeineslinger)

[summary] => What's the weirdest looking car you've ever seen? Take a look at these [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>

Sitting in the office on a grey afternoon and facing the fearsome prospect of having to brave the biting wintry weather that seems to have replaced our much-awaited spring, I felt the need for a little amusement. What better way to forget these woes than by scouring the internet for ‘weird cars’? I asked myself. The results were entertaining, fascinating, and - at times - frankly disturbing. The search turned up this gem: Villageofjoy’s 50 weird and crazy cars , where I can guarantee you will find some of the strangest vehicles to have ever cruised this planet. (A few personal favourites below.) I wonder, how much money would these cars raise for charity?

Most disturbing...





(Image: Elmer Presslee)

Because I have Game of Thrones on the mind...





(Image: groovehouse)

Om nom nom...





(Image: Rodny Dioxin)

Plain weird...





(Image: Archie McPhee Seattle)

Wish I could make sandcastles like this...





(Image: SantiMB)

Puts a smile on your face...





(Image: caffeineslinger)

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Sitting in the office on a grey afternoon and facing the fearsome prospect of having to brave the biting wintry weather that seems to have replaced our much-awaited spring, I felt the need for a little amusement. What better way to forget these woes than by scouring the internet for ‘weird cars’? I asked myself. The results were entertaining, fascinating, and - at times - frankly disturbing. The search turned up this gem: Villageofjoy’s 50 weird and crazy cars , where I can guarantee you will find some of the strangest vehicles to have ever cruised this planet. (A few personal favourites below.) I wonder, how much money would these cars raise for charity?

Most disturbing...

(Image: Elmer Presslee)

Because I have Game of Thrones on the mind...


(Image: groovehouse)

Om nom nom...

(Image: Rodny Dioxin)

Plain weird...

(Image: Archie McPhee Seattle)

Wish I could make sandcastles like this...

(Image: SantiMB)

Puts a smile on your face...

(Image: caffeineslinger)

[summary] => What's the weirdest looking car you've ever seen? Take a look at these [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>

Sitting in the office on a grey afternoon and facing the fearsome prospect of having to brave the biting wintry weather that seems to have replaced our much-awaited spring, I felt the need for a little amusement. What better way to forget these woes than by scouring the internet for ‘weird cars’? I asked myself. The results were entertaining, fascinating, and - at times - frankly disturbing. The search turned up this gem: Villageofjoy’s 50 weird and crazy cars , where I can guarantee you will find some of the strangest vehicles to have ever cruised this planet. (A few personal favourites below.) I wonder, how much money would these cars raise for charity?

Most disturbing...





(Image: Elmer Presslee)

Because I have Game of Thrones on the mind...





(Image: groovehouse)

Om nom nom...





(Image: Rodny Dioxin)

Plain weird...





(Image: Archie McPhee Seattle)

Wish I could make sandcastles like this...





(Image: SantiMB)

Puts a smile on your face...





(Image: caffeineslinger)

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What's the weirdest looking car you've ever seen? Take a look at these

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Jan
30

Giveacar Pledge Draw Competition

By admin

About Giveacar

Fancy a free Amazon Kindle Fire? It could be yours in just a few simple steps, read on to find out how! ...

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Giveacar Pledge Draw Competition


Fancy a free Amazon Kindle Fire? It could be yours in just a few simple steps, read on to find out how!

All you need to do is complete this form to pledge your car with Giveacar (don’t worry: this is NOT a binding agreement!) and we’ll send you a free car bumper sticker. If you display this on your vehicle and send us a picture of it, you’ll be entered into the prize draw! By pledging your car you will not only be in with a chance of winning a great prize, but also will be spreading the word about Giveacar’s unique service which has supported over 1000 charities!

How to enter:

  1. Fill in our pledge form and we’ll send you a pack containing a sticker
  2. Display the sticker on your vehicle and take a picture of it.*
  3. Send the picture to charity@giveacar.co.uk or tweet it to @giveacar
  4. You’ll be entered into the prize draw and notified if you are a winner of the Amazon Kindle Fire.
*Please ensure that the image does not contain inappropriate or sensitive material (like your vehicle registration number) as we will be posting them through our network.

The important rule to remember is that you will only be entered into the draw if you have either: tweeted the photo to @Giveacar or emailed it to charity@giveacar.co.uk. The next prize draw will be on 1st July 2013… Good luck!

Terms: Open to residents of the UK only. Only one entry per person, per prize draw. The winner will be selected at random on 1st July 2013 by the Giveacar office. The winner will be notified by email or telephone (using the details provided at entry) within 1 week of the closing date. If Giveacar cannot contact the winner (via the details provided at the date of entry) within a reasonable period of time (to be established at Giveacar’s sole discretion), Giveacar reserves the right to re-draw a winner on these terms. Please allow 28 days for delivery of the prize. Giveacar accepts no responsibility for the prize being lost, damaged or delayed in the post. Giveacar reserves the right to cancel the prize draw at any point. Giveacar reserves the right to replace the prize with an alternative product at any point. [summary] => Fancy a free Amazon Kindle Fire? It could be yours in just a few simple steps, read on to find out how! [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>

Giveacar Pledge Draw Competition



Fancy a free Amazon Kindle Fire? It could be yours in just a few simple steps, read on to find out how!

All you need to do is complete this form to pledge your car with Giveacar (don’t worry: this is NOT a binding agreement!) and we’ll send you a free car bumper sticker. If you display this on your vehicle and send us a picture of it, you’ll be entered into the prize draw!>

By pledging your car you will not only be in with a chance of winning a great prize, but also will be spreading the word about Giveacar’s unique service which has supported over 1000 charities!

How to enter:

  1. Fill in our pledge form and we’ll send you a pack containing a sticker
  2. Display the sticker on your vehicle and take a picture of it.*
  3. Send the picture to charity@giveacar.co.uk or tweet it to @giveacar
  4. You’ll be entered into the prize draw and notified if you are a winner of the Amazon Kindle Fire.

*Please ensure that the image does not contain inappropriate or sensitive material (like your vehicle registration number) as we will be posting them through our network.

The important rule to remember is that you will only be entered into the draw if you have either: tweeted the photo to @Giveacar or emailed it to charity@giveacar.co.uk.
The next prize draw will be on 1st July 2013… Good luck!

Terms: Open to residents of the UK only. Only one entry per person, per prize draw. The winner will be selected at random on 1st July 2013 by the Giveacar office. The winner will be notified by email or telephone (using the details provided at entry) within 1 week of the closing date. If Giveacar cannot contact the winner (via the details provided at the date of entry) within a reasonable period of time (to be established at Giveacar’s sole discretion), Giveacar reserves the right to re-draw a winner on these terms. Please allow 28 days for delivery of the prize. Giveacar accepts no responsibility for the prize being lost, damaged or delayed in the post. Giveacar reserves the right to cancel the prize draw at any point. Giveacar reserves the right to replace the prize with an alternative product at any point.

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Fancy a free Amazon Kindle Fire? It could be yours in just a few simple steps, read on to find out how!

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Giveacar Pledge Draw Competition


Fancy a free Amazon Kindle Fire? It could be yours in just a few simple steps, read on to find out how!

All you need to do is complete this form to pledge your car with Giveacar (don’t worry: this is NOT a binding agreement!) and we’ll send you a free car bumper sticker. If you display this on your vehicle and send us a picture of it, you’ll be entered into the prize draw! By pledging your car you will not only be in with a chance of winning a great prize, but also will be spreading the word about Giveacar’s unique service which has supported over 1000 charities!

How to enter:

  1. Fill in our pledge form and we’ll send you a pack containing a sticker
  2. Display the sticker on your vehicle and take a picture of it.*
  3. Send the picture to charity@giveacar.co.uk or tweet it to @giveacar
  4. You’ll be entered into the prize draw and notified if you are a winner of the Amazon Kindle Fire.
*Please ensure that the image does not contain inappropriate or sensitive material (like your vehicle registration number) as we will be posting them through our network.

The important rule to remember is that you will only be entered into the draw if you have either: tweeted the photo to @Giveacar or emailed it to charity@giveacar.co.uk. The next prize draw will be on 1st July 2013… Good luck!

Terms: Open to residents of the UK only. Only one entry per person, per prize draw. The winner will be selected at random on 1st July 2013 by the Giveacar office. The winner will be notified by email or telephone (using the details provided at entry) within 1 week of the closing date. If Giveacar cannot contact the winner (via the details provided at the date of entry) within a reasonable period of time (to be established at Giveacar’s sole discretion), Giveacar reserves the right to re-draw a winner on these terms. Please allow 28 days for delivery of the prize. Giveacar accepts no responsibility for the prize being lost, damaged or delayed in the post. Giveacar reserves the right to cancel the prize draw at any point. Giveacar reserves the right to replace the prize with an alternative product at any point. [summary] => Fancy a free Amazon Kindle Fire? It could be yours in just a few simple steps, read on to find out how! [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>

Giveacar Pledge Draw Competition



Fancy a free Amazon Kindle Fire? It could be yours in just a few simple steps, read on to find out how!

All you need to do is complete this form to pledge your car with Giveacar (don’t worry: this is NOT a binding agreement!) and we’ll send you a free car bumper sticker. If you display this on your vehicle and send us a picture of it, you’ll be entered into the prize draw!>

By pledging your car you will not only be in with a chance of winning a great prize, but also will be spreading the word about Giveacar’s unique service which has supported over 1000 charities!

How to enter:

  1. Fill in our pledge form and we’ll send you a pack containing a sticker
  2. Display the sticker on your vehicle and take a picture of it.*
  3. Send the picture to charity@giveacar.co.uk or tweet it to @giveacar
  4. You’ll be entered into the prize draw and notified if you are a winner of the Amazon Kindle Fire.

*Please ensure that the image does not contain inappropriate or sensitive material (like your vehicle registration number) as we will be posting them through our network.

The important rule to remember is that you will only be entered into the draw if you have either: tweeted the photo to @Giveacar or emailed it to charity@giveacar.co.uk.
The next prize draw will be on 1st July 2013… Good luck!

Terms: Open to residents of the UK only. Only one entry per person, per prize draw. The winner will be selected at random on 1st July 2013 by the Giveacar office. The winner will be notified by email or telephone (using the details provided at entry) within 1 week of the closing date. If Giveacar cannot contact the winner (via the details provided at the date of entry) within a reasonable period of time (to be established at Giveacar’s sole discretion), Giveacar reserves the right to re-draw a winner on these terms. Please allow 28 days for delivery of the prize. Giveacar accepts no responsibility for the prize being lost, damaged or delayed in the post. Giveacar reserves the right to cancel the prize draw at any point. Giveacar reserves the right to replace the prize with an alternative product at any point.

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Fancy a free Amazon Kindle Fire? It could be yours in just a few simple steps, read on to find out how!

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Fancy a free Amazon Kindle Fire? It could be yours in just a few simple steps, read on to find out how!

) ) [links] => Array ( [#theme] => links__node [#pre_render] => Array ( [0] => drupal_pre_render_links ) [#attributes] => Array ( [class] => Array ( [0] => links [1] => inline ) ) [node] => Array ( [#theme] => links__node__node [#links] => Array ( [node-readmore] => Array ( [title] => Read more about Giveacar Pledge Draw Competition [href] => node/3967 [html] => 1 [attributes] => Array ( [rel] => tag [title] => Giveacar Pledge Draw Competition ) ) ) [#attributes] => Array ( [class] => Array ( [0] => links [1] => inline ) ) ) [blog] => Array ( [#theme] => links__node__blog [#links] => Array ( [blog_usernames_blog] => Array ( [title] => admin's blog [href] => blog/1 [attributes] => Array ( [title] => Read admin's latest blog entries. ) ) ) [#attributes] => Array ( [class] => Array ( [0] => links [1] => inline ) ) ) ) [field_tag] => Array ( [#theme] => field [#weight] => 1 [#title] => Tags [#access] => 1 [#label_display] => above [#view_mode] => teaser [#language] => und [#field_name] => field_tag [#field_type] => taxonomy_term_reference [#field_translatable] => 1 [#entity_type] => node [#bundle] => blog [#object] => stdClass Object ( [vid] => 3967 [uid] => 1 [title] => Giveacar Pledge Draw Competition [log] => [status] => 1 [comment] => 2 [promote] => 1 [sticky] => 0 [nid] => 3967 [type] => blog [language] => und [created] => 1359540269 [changed] => 1367577070 [tnid] => 0 [translate] => 0 [revision_timestamp] => 1367577070 [revision_uid] => 1 [body] => Array ( [und] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [value] =>

Giveacar Pledge Draw Competition


Fancy a free Amazon Kindle Fire? It could be yours in just a few simple steps, read on to find out how!

All you need to do is complete this form to pledge your car with Giveacar (don’t worry: this is NOT a binding agreement!) and we’ll send you a free car bumper sticker. If you display this on your vehicle and send us a picture of it, you’ll be entered into the prize draw! By pledging your car you will not only be in with a chance of winning a great prize, but also will be spreading the word about Giveacar’s unique service which has supported over 1000 charities!

How to enter:

  1. Fill in our pledge form and we’ll send you a pack containing a sticker
  2. Display the sticker on your vehicle and take a picture of it.*
  3. Send the picture to charity@giveacar.co.uk or tweet it to @giveacar
  4. You’ll be entered into the prize draw and notified if you are a winner of the Amazon Kindle Fire.
*Please ensure that the image does not contain inappropriate or sensitive material (like your vehicle registration number) as we will be posting them through our network.

The important rule to remember is that you will only be entered into the draw if you have either: tweeted the photo to @Giveacar or emailed it to charity@giveacar.co.uk. The next prize draw will be on 1st July 2013… Good luck!

Terms: Open to residents of the UK only. Only one entry per person, per prize draw. The winner will be selected at random on 1st July 2013 by the Giveacar office. The winner will be notified by email or telephone (using the details provided at entry) within 1 week of the closing date. If Giveacar cannot contact the winner (via the details provided at the date of entry) within a reasonable period of time (to be established at Giveacar’s sole discretion), Giveacar reserves the right to re-draw a winner on these terms. Please allow 28 days for delivery of the prize. Giveacar accepts no responsibility for the prize being lost, damaged or delayed in the post. Giveacar reserves the right to cancel the prize draw at any point. Giveacar reserves the right to replace the prize with an alternative product at any point. [summary] => Fancy a free Amazon Kindle Fire? It could be yours in just a few simple steps, read on to find out how! [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>

Giveacar Pledge Draw Competition



Fancy a free Amazon Kindle Fire? It could be yours in just a few simple steps, read on to find out how!

All you need to do is complete this form to pledge your car with Giveacar (don’t worry: this is NOT a binding agreement!) and we’ll send you a free car bumper sticker. If you display this on your vehicle and send us a picture of it, you’ll be entered into the prize draw!>

By pledging your car you will not only be in with a chance of winning a great prize, but also will be spreading the word about Giveacar’s unique service which has supported over 1000 charities!

How to enter:

  1. Fill in our pledge form and we’ll send you a pack containing a sticker
  2. Display the sticker on your vehicle and take a picture of it.*
  3. Send the picture to charity@giveacar.co.uk or tweet it to @giveacar
  4. You’ll be entered into the prize draw and notified if you are a winner of the Amazon Kindle Fire.

*Please ensure that the image does not contain inappropriate or sensitive material (like your vehicle registration number) as we will be posting them through our network.

The important rule to remember is that you will only be entered into the draw if you have either: tweeted the photo to @Giveacar or emailed it to charity@giveacar.co.uk.
The next prize draw will be on 1st July 2013… Good luck!

Terms: Open to residents of the UK only. Only one entry per person, per prize draw. The winner will be selected at random on 1st July 2013 by the Giveacar office. The winner will be notified by email or telephone (using the details provided at entry) within 1 week of the closing date. If Giveacar cannot contact the winner (via the details provided at the date of entry) within a reasonable period of time (to be established at Giveacar’s sole discretion), Giveacar reserves the right to re-draw a winner on these terms. Please allow 28 days for delivery of the prize. Giveacar accepts no responsibility for the prize being lost, damaged or delayed in the post. Giveacar reserves the right to cancel the prize draw at any point. Giveacar reserves the right to replace the prize with an alternative product at any point.

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Fancy a free Amazon Kindle Fire? It could be yours in just a few simple steps, read on to find out how!

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