Blogs

Jul
23

National Countryside Week

By admin

With all this hot, sunny weather, now seems like the perfect time to escape the urban greenhouse (if you live there) and start exploring fresh air and green fields in the British countryside. But what do you actually know about rural Britain? Here’s a quick quiz to test your know-how (answers at the bottom of the page)… 1) We tend to think of Britain as quite a built up, urban place. But what percentage of the Britain’s total land area is actually rural? A) 30% B) 57% C) 69% D) 93%...

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1)	We tend to think of Britain as quite a built up, urban place. But what percentage of the Britain’s total land area is actually rural?

A)	30% B) 57% C) 69% D) 93%

2) One of the English countryside’s stranger pursuits is cheese rolling. Every year, thousands of people get together for the health and safety nightmare of rolling down an extremely steep hill, chasing an 8lb wheel of cheese. But which county is the home of this unusual pastime?

A) Gloucestershire B) Devon C) Cornwall D) Suffolk

3) If you’re a Londoner, going to work on the Tube with a massive grin on your face might sound ‘a bit weird’. But which of these jobs is the happiest?

A) Office worker B) Teacher in a rural school C) Circus performer D) Farmer

4) On a grimmer note – despite the beauty of England’s green and pleasant land, life in the British countryside can be tough. People in rural areas have been badly hit by a combination of the recession, tough farming conditions, unemployment and a lack of investment. But how many working age people in rural Britain live below the UK poverty line (60% less than the average UK household income)?

A) 5% B) 12% C) 16% D) 25%

5) Why are Britain’s badgers quaking in their boots?

A)	Because they’re hiding from Bill Oddie. B)	Because they are being culled as a proposed solution to bovine TB. C)	Because they are being killed for their skins to clothe catwalk models. D)	 Because they are scared of tractors.

6) British countryside is famous for its wildlife. Cuddly creatures like hedgehogs, dormice and otters can all be found in rural Britain, along with the less cuddly but just as precious grass snake and greater crested newt.  But, thanks to human activities such as habitat destruction, intensive farming and impact on climate change, these creatures are sadly in decline. But just how many species are shrinking?

A)	10% B) 40% C) 60% D) 90%

7) And finally – despite its problems, the UK countryside still manages to attract holidaymakers from far and wide. (And looking at those gorgeous landscapes, who can blame us?) But just how many trips do we make the country each year?

A)	75,000 B) 750,000 C) 7.5 million D) 75 million 


Answers
1 – D
2 – A
3 – D
4 – C
5 – B
6 – C
7 – D

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With all this hot, sunny weather, now seems like the perfect time to escape the urban greenhouse (if you live there) and start exploring fresh air and green fields in the British countryside. But what do you actually know about rural Britain? Here’s a quick quiz to test your know-how (answers at the bottom of the page)…

1) We tend to think of Britain as quite a built up, urban place. But what percentage of the Britain’s total land area is actually rural?

A) 30% B) 57% C) 69% D) 93%

2) One of the English countryside’s stranger pursuits is cheese rolling. Every year, thousands of people get together for the health and safety nightmare of rolling down an extremely steep hill, chasing an 8lb wheel of cheese. But which county is the home of this unusual pastime?

A) Gloucestershire B) Devon C) Cornwall D) Suffolk

3) If you’re a Londoner, going to work on the Tube with a massive grin on your face might sound ‘a bit weird’. But which of these jobs is the happiest?

A) Office worker B) Teacher in a rural school C) Circus performer D) Farmer

4) On a grimmer note – despite the beauty of England’s green and pleasant land, life in the British countryside can be tough. People in rural areas have been badly hit by a combination of the recession, tough farming conditions, unemployment and a lack of investment. But how many working age people in rural Britain live below the UK poverty line (60% less than the average UK household income)?

A) 5% B) 12% C) 16% D) 25%

5) Why are Britain’s badgers quaking in their boots?

A) Because they’re hiding from Bill Oddie. B) Because they are being culled as a proposed solution to bovine TB. C) Because they are being killed for their skins to clothe catwalk models. D) Because they are scared of tractors.

6) British countryside is famous for its wildlife. Cuddly creatures like hedgehogs, dormice and otters can all be found in rural Britain, along with the less cuddly but just as precious grass snake and greater crested newt. But, thanks to human activities such as habitat destruction, intensive farming and impact on climate change, these creatures are sadly in decline. But just how many species are shrinking?

A) 10% B) 40% C) 60% D) 90%

7) And finally – despite its problems, the UK countryside still manages to attract holidaymakers from far and wide. (And looking at those gorgeous landscapes, who can blame us?) But just how many trips do we make the country each year?

A) 75,000 B) 750,000 C) 7.5 million D) 75 million

Answers
1 – D
2 – A
3 – D
4 – C
5 – B
6 – C
7 – D

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With all this hot, sunny weather, now seems like the perfect time to escape the urban greenhouse (if you live there) and start exploring fresh air and green fields in the British countryside. But what do you actually know about rural Britain? Here’s a quick quiz to test your know-how (answers at the bottom of the page)…

1) We tend to think of Britain as quite a built up, urban place. But what percentage of the Britain’s total land area is actually rural?

A) 30% B) 57% C) 69% D) 93%

2) One of the English countryside’s stranger pursuits is cheese rolling. Every year, thousands of people get together for the health and safety nightmare of rolling down an extremely steep hill, chasing an 8lb wheel of cheese. But which county is the home of this unusual pastime?

A) Gloucestershire B) Devon C) Cornwall D) Suffolk

3) If you’re a Londoner, going to work on the Tube with a massive grin on your face might sound ‘a bit weird’. But which of these jobs is the happiest?

A) Office worker B) Teacher in a rural school C) Circus performer D) Farmer

4) On a grimmer note – despite the beauty of England’s green and pleasant land, life in the British countryside can be tough. People in rural areas have been badly hit by a combination of the recession, tough farming conditions, unemployment and a lack of investment. But how many working age people in rural Britain live below the UK poverty line (60% less than the average UK household income)?

A) 5% B) 12% C) 16% D) 25%

5) Why are Britain’s badgers quaking in their boots?

A) Because they’re hiding from Bill Oddie. B) Because they are being culled as a proposed solution to bovine TB. C) Because they are being killed for their skins to clothe catwalk models. D) Because they are scared of tractors.

6) British countryside is famous for its wildlife. Cuddly creatures like hedgehogs, dormice and otters can all be found in rural Britain, along with the less cuddly but just as precious grass snake and greater crested newt. But, thanks to human activities such as habitat destruction, intensive farming and impact on climate change, these creatures are sadly in decline. But just how many species are shrinking?

A) 10% B) 40% C) 60% D) 90%

7) And finally – despite its problems, the UK countryside still manages to attract holidaymakers from far and wide. (And looking at those gorgeous landscapes, who can blame us?) But just how many trips do we make the country each year?

A) 75,000 B) 750,000 C) 7.5 million D) 75 million

Answers
1 – D
2 – A
3 – D
4 – C
5 – B
6 – C
7 – D

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With all this hot, sunny weather, now seems like the perfect time to escape the urban greenhouse (if you live there) and start exploring fresh air and green fields in the British countryside. But what do you actually know about rural Britain? Here’s a quick quiz to test your know-how (answers at the bottom of the page)…

1) We tend to think of Britain as quite a built up, urban place. But what percentage of the Britain’s total land area is actually rural?

A) 30% B) 57% C) 69% D) 93%

) ) )
Jul
10

World Population Day

By admin

Tomorrow is world population day – and with over 7 billion human beings rattling around the planet, it’s a big issue. If you’d like to check out just how many people there are right at this very moment, take a look at the World Population Clock It’s pretty staggering just how quickly those numbers shoot up!...

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Tomorrow is world population day – and with over 7 billion human beings rattling around the planet, it’s a big issue. If you’d like to check out just how many people there are right at this very moment, take a look at the World Population Clock It’s pretty staggering just how quickly those numbers shoot up!

One big contributor to this growing population trend is that people are, in general, living much longer than they used to. Thanks to developments in hygiene, sanitation, adequate nutrition and medicine, global life expectancy has increased by 11 years for men and 12 for women from 40 years ago, with men in the UK able to expect to reach the ripe old age of 78, and women 82.

Birth rates also contribute. According to the Population Reference Bureau, the average global child rate is 2.4, but this jumps to 4.4 in the poorest nations. This is no story of even global expansion - by 2050, Europe’s birth rate is actually expected to go down – from 740 million to 732 million, as couples have less children or choose not to have children at all. In 2025, it actually probable that death rates will exceed birth rates in developed nations, as birth rates drop and the population ages. The growth comes from the poorest developing nations, where low incomes, high economic instability and shorter life expectancies contribute to high birth rates.

With all these huge numbers, it’s sometimes hard to get your head around what’s really going on. So some helpful people came up with the idea of shrinking the globe down to a village of just 100 people and thinking – what would that world look like?

Well, there’d be only 12 Europeans, 61 Asians and only 1 Oceanian. There’d be 33 Christians, 21 Muslims, 13 Hindus and 3 Atheists. 20 people would own 75% of the world’s wealth, and 21 would live on £1 a day or less. 12 would be illiterate and 14 would go to bed hungry.

world

So with the world population looking to hit 8 billion by 2025, it makes sense to shrink things down to get our globe into perspective. But the big numbers still could potentially lead to big problems – with a changing climate, unequal food and wealth distribution and an increasing number of people on earth, more and more people may be facing hardship, hunger and a lack of resources. But despite all this, there is much to give us hope. The number of people living in extreme poverty has plummeted from 43% to 21% from 1990 - 2010, and previously developing nations such as India and China have experienced dramatic economic growth. Yet whilst less people are desperately poor, only a small percentage of the world (primarily rich Western nations, such as the UK) consumes the majority of global wealth, resources and energy. With a fairer distribution, world population day might not be something to fear, but an event to cautiously celebrate.

[summary] => [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>

Tomorrow is world population day – and with over 7 billion human beings rattling around the planet, it’s a big issue. If you’d like to check out just how many people there are right at this very moment, take a look at the World Population Clock It’s pretty staggering just how quickly those numbers shoot up!

One big contributor to this growing population trend is that people are, in general, living much longer than they used to. Thanks to developments in hygiene, sanitation, adequate nutrition and medicine, global life expectancy has increased by 11 years for men and 12 for women from 40 years ago, with men in the UK able to expect to reach the ripe old age of 78, and women 82.

Birth rates also contribute. According to the Population Reference Bureau, the average global child rate is 2.4, but this jumps to 4.4 in the poorest nations. This is no story of even global expansion - by 2050, Europe’s birth rate is actually expected to go down – from 740 million to 732 million, as couples have less children or choose not to have children at all. In 2025, it actually probable that death rates will exceed birth rates in developed nations, as birth rates drop and the population ages. The growth comes from the poorest developing nations, where low incomes, high economic instability and shorter life expectancies contribute to high birth rates.

With all these huge numbers, it’s sometimes hard to get your head around what’s really going on. So some helpful people came up with the idea of shrinking the globe down to a village of just 100 people and thinking – what would that world look like?

Well, there’d be only 12 Europeans, 61 Asians and only 1 Oceanian. There’d be 33 Christians, 21 Muslims, 13 Hindus and 3 Atheists. 20 people would own 75% of the world’s wealth, and 21 would live on £1 a day or less. 12 would be illiterate and 14 would go to bed hungry.

world

So with the world population looking to hit 8 billion by 2025, it makes sense to shrink things down to get our globe into perspective. But the big numbers still could potentially lead to big problems – with a changing climate, unequal food and wealth distribution and an increasing number of people on earth, more and more people may be facing hardship, hunger and a lack of resources. But despite all this, there is much to give us hope. The number of people living in extreme poverty has plummeted from 43% to 21% from 1990 - 2010, and previously developing nations such as India and China have experienced dramatic economic growth. Yet whilst less people are desperately poor, only a small percentage of the world (primarily rich Western nations, such as the UK) consumes the majority of global wealth, resources and energy. With a fairer distribution, world population day might not be something to fear, but an event to cautiously celebrate.

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Tomorrow is world population day – and with over 7 billion human beings rattling around the planet, it’s a big issue. If you’d like to check out just how many people there are right at this very moment, take a look at the World Population Clock It’s pretty staggering just how quickly those numbers shoot up!

One big contributor to this growing population trend is that people are, in general, living much longer than they used to. Thanks to developments in hygiene, sanitation, adequate nutrition and medicine, global life expectancy has increased by 11 years for men and 12 for women from 40 years ago, with men in the UK able to expect to reach the ripe old age of 78, and women 82.

Birth rates also contribute. According to the Population Reference Bureau, the average global child rate is 2.4, but this jumps to 4.4 in the poorest nations. This is no story of even global expansion - by 2050, Europe’s birth rate is actually expected to go down – from 740 million to 732 million, as couples have less children or choose not to have children at all. In 2025, it actually probable that death rates will exceed birth rates in developed nations, as birth rates drop and the population ages. The growth comes from the poorest developing nations, where low incomes, high economic instability and shorter life expectancies contribute to high birth rates.

With all these huge numbers, it’s sometimes hard to get your head around what’s really going on. So some helpful people came up with the idea of shrinking the globe down to a village of just 100 people and thinking – what would that world look like?

Well, there’d be only 12 Europeans, 61 Asians and only 1 Oceanian. There’d be 33 Christians, 21 Muslims, 13 Hindus and 3 Atheists. 20 people would own 75% of the world’s wealth, and 21 would live on £1 a day or less. 12 would be illiterate and 14 would go to bed hungry.

world

So with the world population looking to hit 8 billion by 2025, it makes sense to shrink things down to get our globe into perspective. But the big numbers still could potentially lead to big problems – with a changing climate, unequal food and wealth distribution and an increasing number of people on earth, more and more people may be facing hardship, hunger and a lack of resources. But despite all this, there is much to give us hope. The number of people living in extreme poverty has plummeted from 43% to 21% from 1990 - 2010, and previously developing nations such as India and China have experienced dramatic economic growth. Yet whilst less people are desperately poor, only a small percentage of the world (primarily rich Western nations, such as the UK) consumes the majority of global wealth, resources and energy. With a fairer distribution, world population day might not be something to fear, but an event to cautiously celebrate.

[summary] => [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>

Tomorrow is world population day – and with over 7 billion human beings rattling around the planet, it’s a big issue. If you’d like to check out just how many people there are right at this very moment, take a look at the World Population Clock It’s pretty staggering just how quickly those numbers shoot up!

One big contributor to this growing population trend is that people are, in general, living much longer than they used to. Thanks to developments in hygiene, sanitation, adequate nutrition and medicine, global life expectancy has increased by 11 years for men and 12 for women from 40 years ago, with men in the UK able to expect to reach the ripe old age of 78, and women 82.

Birth rates also contribute. According to the Population Reference Bureau, the average global child rate is 2.4, but this jumps to 4.4 in the poorest nations. This is no story of even global expansion - by 2050, Europe’s birth rate is actually expected to go down – from 740 million to 732 million, as couples have less children or choose not to have children at all. In 2025, it actually probable that death rates will exceed birth rates in developed nations, as birth rates drop and the population ages. The growth comes from the poorest developing nations, where low incomes, high economic instability and shorter life expectancies contribute to high birth rates.

With all these huge numbers, it’s sometimes hard to get your head around what’s really going on. So some helpful people came up with the idea of shrinking the globe down to a village of just 100 people and thinking – what would that world look like?

Well, there’d be only 12 Europeans, 61 Asians and only 1 Oceanian. There’d be 33 Christians, 21 Muslims, 13 Hindus and 3 Atheists. 20 people would own 75% of the world’s wealth, and 21 would live on £1 a day or less. 12 would be illiterate and 14 would go to bed hungry.

world

So with the world population looking to hit 8 billion by 2025, it makes sense to shrink things down to get our globe into perspective. But the big numbers still could potentially lead to big problems – with a changing climate, unequal food and wealth distribution and an increasing number of people on earth, more and more people may be facing hardship, hunger and a lack of resources. But despite all this, there is much to give us hope. The number of people living in extreme poverty has plummeted from 43% to 21% from 1990 - 2010, and previously developing nations such as India and China have experienced dramatic economic growth. Yet whilst less people are desperately poor, only a small percentage of the world (primarily rich Western nations, such as the UK) consumes the majority of global wealth, resources and energy. With a fairer distribution, world population day might not be something to fear, but an event to cautiously celebrate.

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Tomorrow is world population day – and with over 7 billion human beings rattling around the planet, it’s a big issue. If you’d like to check out just how many people there are right at this very moment, take a look at the World Population Clock It’s pretty staggering just how quickly those numbers shoot up!

) ) )
Jul
4

Sickle Cell Awareness Month

By admin

Charities

July means different things to different people. For schoolchildren, it means summer holidays (and nightmares for their parents). For Americans, it’s the 4th July. For London commuters, it means horrible Tube journeys. But for sickle cell anaemia sufferers, it’s another month living with pain....

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                                            [value] => July means different things to different people. For  schoolchildren, it means summer holidays (and nightmares for their parents). For Americans, it’s the 4th July. For London commuters, it means horrible Tube journeys. But for sickle cell anaemia sufferers, it’s another month living with pain.

July is Sickle Cell Awareness Month. This painful condition affects over 6,000 people in the UK alone – but not many people understand it. Sickle cell anaemia is passed on genetically, and tends to be more common for people of Asian or Afro-Caribbean heritage  - at least 1 in 10-40 British people of Afro-Caribbean decent have the sickle cell trait, and 1 in 60-200 have the actual condition.

If you suffer from sickle cell anaemia, the red blood cells in your body have sickle haemoglobin, rather than normal haemoglobin. This means they are not flexible flat circles, as they should be, but rigid sickle shapes. These sickle shaped cells don’t flow through the blood vessels so well, and can get stuck together, blocking oxygen from passing freely through the body. This creates pain, anaemia and organ damage, which can lead to death. 

Living with sickle cell anaemia can be extremely tough. They can experience extreme pain, and often need hospital treatment to deal with symptoms. During a sickle cell crisis, sufferers experience sharp pains and sometimes swellings. As well as pain, living with the disease can really get in the way of everyday life. Imagine spending winter indoors worrying that you’ll pick up an infection from a low immune system, or not being able to go to the shops or kick a football about with your friends because your body is too easily exhausted from the anaemia! 

Despite all this, people with sickle cell anaemia still manage to lead amazingly normal lives. They go to school, get degrees, hold down jobs and have families, all with a tremendous amount of strength and courage. So this Sickle Cell Awareness Month, take a minute to think about what sickle cell sufferers are going through, and maybe even think about what you could do to help. Take a look at Sickle Cell Society or one of Giveacar’s charity supporters, Sickle Cell and Young Stroke Survivors, and maybe even consider donating your old car to support sufferers. You’ll be changing lives.


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July means different things to different people. For schoolchildren, it means summer holidays (and nightmares for their parents). For Americans, it’s the 4th July. For London commuters, it means horrible Tube journeys. But for sickle cell anaemia sufferers, it’s another month living with pain.

July is Sickle Cell Awareness Month. This painful condition affects over 6,000 people in the UK alone – but not many people understand it. Sickle cell anaemia is passed on genetically, and tends to be more common for people of Asian or Afro-Caribbean heritage - at least 1 in 10-40 British people of Afro-Caribbean decent have the sickle cell trait, and 1 in 60-200 have the actual condition.

If you suffer from sickle cell anaemia, the red blood cells in your body have sickle haemoglobin, rather than normal haemoglobin. This means they are not flexible flat circles, as they should be, but rigid sickle shapes. These sickle shaped cells don’t flow through the blood vessels so well, and can get stuck together, blocking oxygen from passing freely through the body. This creates pain, anaemia and organ damage, which can lead to death.

Living with sickle cell anaemia can be extremely tough. They can experience extreme pain, and often need hospital treatment to deal with symptoms. During a sickle cell crisis, sufferers experience sharp pains and sometimes swellings. As well as pain, living with the disease can really get in the way of everyday life. Imagine spending winter indoors worrying that you’ll pick up an infection from a low immune system, or not being able to go to the shops or kick a football about with your friends because your body is too easily exhausted from the anaemia!

Despite all this, people with sickle cell anaemia still manage to lead amazingly normal lives. They go to school, get degrees, hold down jobs and have families, all with a tremendous amount of strength and courage. So this Sickle Cell Awareness Month, take a minute to think about what sickle cell sufferers are going through, and maybe even think about what you could do to help. Take a look at Sickle Cell Society or one of Giveacar’s charity supporters, Sickle Cell and Young Stroke Survivors, and maybe even consider donating your old car to support sufferers. You’ll be changing lives.

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July means different things to different people. For schoolchildren, it means summer holidays (and nightmares for their parents). For Americans, it’s the 4th July. For London commuters, it means horrible Tube journeys. But for sickle cell anaemia sufferers, it’s another month living with pain.

July is Sickle Cell Awareness Month. This painful condition affects over 6,000 people in the UK alone – but not many people understand it. Sickle cell anaemia is passed on genetically, and tends to be more common for people of Asian or Afro-Caribbean heritage - at least 1 in 10-40 British people of Afro-Caribbean decent have the sickle cell trait, and 1 in 60-200 have the actual condition.

If you suffer from sickle cell anaemia, the red blood cells in your body have sickle haemoglobin, rather than normal haemoglobin. This means they are not flexible flat circles, as they should be, but rigid sickle shapes. These sickle shaped cells don’t flow through the blood vessels so well, and can get stuck together, blocking oxygen from passing freely through the body. This creates pain, anaemia and organ damage, which can lead to death.

Living with sickle cell anaemia can be extremely tough. They can experience extreme pain, and often need hospital treatment to deal with symptoms. During a sickle cell crisis, sufferers experience sharp pains and sometimes swellings. As well as pain, living with the disease can really get in the way of everyday life. Imagine spending winter indoors worrying that you’ll pick up an infection from a low immune system, or not being able to go to the shops or kick a football about with your friends because your body is too easily exhausted from the anaemia!

Despite all this, people with sickle cell anaemia still manage to lead amazingly normal lives. They go to school, get degrees, hold down jobs and have families, all with a tremendous amount of strength and courage. So this Sickle Cell Awareness Month, take a minute to think about what sickle cell sufferers are going through, and maybe even think about what you could do to help. Take a look at Sickle Cell Society or one of Giveacar’s charity supporters, Sickle Cell and Young Stroke Survivors, and maybe even consider donating your old car to support sufferers. You’ll be changing lives.

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July means different things to different people. For schoolchildren, it means summer holidays (and nightmares for their parents). For Americans, it’s the 4th July. For London commuters, it means horrible Tube journeys. But for sickle cell anaemia sufferers, it’s another month living with pain.

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July means different things to different people. For schoolchildren, it means summer holidays (and nightmares for their parents). For Americans, it’s the 4th July. For London commuters, it means horrible Tube journeys. But for sickle cell anaemia sufferers, it’s another month living with pain.

July is Sickle Cell Awareness Month. This painful condition affects over 6,000 people in the UK alone – but not many people understand it. Sickle cell anaemia is passed on genetically, and tends to be more common for people of Asian or Afro-Caribbean heritage - at least 1 in 10-40 British people of Afro-Caribbean decent have the sickle cell trait, and 1 in 60-200 have the actual condition.

If you suffer from sickle cell anaemia, the red blood cells in your body have sickle haemoglobin, rather than normal haemoglobin. This means they are not flexible flat circles, as they should be, but rigid sickle shapes. These sickle shaped cells don’t flow through the blood vessels so well, and can get stuck together, blocking oxygen from passing freely through the body. This creates pain, anaemia and organ damage, which can lead to death.

Living with sickle cell anaemia can be extremely tough. They can experience extreme pain, and often need hospital treatment to deal with symptoms. During a sickle cell crisis, sufferers experience sharp pains and sometimes swellings. As well as pain, living with the disease can really get in the way of everyday life. Imagine spending winter indoors worrying that you’ll pick up an infection from a low immune system, or not being able to go to the shops or kick a football about with your friends because your body is too easily exhausted from the anaemia!

Despite all this, people with sickle cell anaemia still manage to lead amazingly normal lives. They go to school, get degrees, hold down jobs and have families, all with a tremendous amount of strength and courage. So this Sickle Cell Awareness Month, take a minute to think about what sickle cell sufferers are going through, and maybe even think about what you could do to help. Take a look at Sickle Cell Society or one of Giveacar’s charity supporters, Sickle Cell and Young Stroke Survivors, and maybe even consider donating your old car to support sufferers. You’ll be changing lives.

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Jun
28

Deafblind Awareness Week

By admin

Charities

Did you wake up this morning to the blissful sound of birdsong? Or, perhaps more likely, to the insistent, furious beeping of your alarm clock? Now replay the scene. Imagine getting up tomorrow and not being able to hear that beeping. Imagine not being able to see the light blazing through the window. Not being able to hear what your family says to you as you walk downstairs, or see the news on the television....

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Did you wake up this morning to the blissful sound of birdsong? Or, perhaps more likely, to the insistent, furious beeping of your alarm clock? Now replay the scene. Imagine getting up tomorrow and not being able to hear that beeping. Imagine not being able to see the light blazing through the window. Not being able to hear what your family says to you as you walk downstairs, or see the news on the television.

That’s how deafblind people live each day, every day. There are 356,000 deafblind people in the UK today, with different degrees of visual impairment and hearing difficulty. Around 220,000 of these people are over 70. Some of them were born with the condition. Some of them acquired it with age. But all of them share the stigma, barriers and daily struggles of not having full hearing and vision.

But let’s not be negative – thanks to new technology and the great work of charities like Deafblind UK and Sense, as well as the passion and positivity of people who are deafblind themselves, these barriers are being overcome.

One example of this is the most famous deafblind person to date, Helen Keller. Helen Keller was the first deafblind person to earn a BA degree, and she overcame the anger and frustration she experienced as a child made deafblind by a fever to help people with disabilities. Through the help of her tutor Anne Mansfield Sullivan, she learned how to communicate with others, write and read braille, and became a well-educated woman and a public advocate for deafblindness. She was also a prolific lecturer and political activist, and wrote no less than 12 books during her lifetime.

Since Helen’s death, rights and support for deafblind people has come on in leaps and bounds. Through the work of charity campaigns, deafblind people are able to get around, take part in their favourite hobbies, make friends and generally take part in ordinary, fulfilled lives. But there are still barriers.

One of the biggest is communication. Without full hearing or sight, it might seem to a person who isn’t deafblind that there’s no way of talking. But deafblind people communicate in lots of different ways. They use Braille, create symbols, use sign language or tactile signing, lip-read with Tadoma (placing their thumb on the speaker’s mouth) – and many more.

As part of Deadfblind Awareness Week, Deafblind UK is helping deafblind people take part in the online world. Through Skype, email and social media, deafblind people can overcome barriers that prevent them from leading full and interconnected lives. They can get in touch with friends and family, improve employability – even just waste time on Facebook! Or this blog…

So this week, when you’re chatting to your colleagues, or going on Twitter in your lunchbreak, try and remember that not everyone finds getting in touch so easy. Think of what your business or your school or community could do to make the lives of deafblind people easier. You could even, if you’ve got an old car lurking in your garage, choose to pledge your car to a deafblind charity. Your donation could really help a deafblind person feel connected.

One Way That Deafblind People Can Communicate [summary] => [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>

Did you wake up this morning to the blissful sound of birdsong? Or, perhaps more likely, to the insistent, furious beeping of your alarm clock? Now replay the scene. Imagine getting up tomorrow and not being able to hear that beeping. Imagine not being able to see the light blazing through the window. Not being able to hear what your family says to you as you walk downstairs, or see the news on the television.

That’s how deafblind people live each day, every day. There are 356,000 deafblind people in the UK today, with different degrees of visual impairment and hearing difficulty. Around 220,000 of these people are over 70. Some of them were born with the condition. Some of them acquired it with age. But all of them share the stigma, barriers and daily struggles of not having full hearing and vision.

But let’s not be negative – thanks to new technology and the great work of charities like Deafblind UK and Sense, as well as the passion and positivity of people who are deafblind themselves, these barriers are being overcome.

One example of this is the most famous deafblind person to date, Helen Keller. Helen Keller was the first deafblind person to earn a BA degree, and she overcame the anger and frustration she experienced as a child made deafblind by a fever to help people with disabilities. Through the help of her tutor Anne Mansfield Sullivan, she learned how to communicate with others, write and read braille, and became a well-educated woman and a public advocate for deafblindness. She was also a prolific lecturer and political activist, and wrote no less than 12 books during her lifetime.

Since Helen’s death, rights and support for deafblind people has come on in leaps and bounds. Through the work of charity campaigns, deafblind people are able to get around, take part in their favourite hobbies, make friends and generally take part in ordinary, fulfilled lives. But there are still barriers.

One of the biggest is communication. Without full hearing or sight, it might seem to a person who isn’t deafblind that there’s no way of talking. But deafblind people communicate in lots of different ways. They use Braille, create symbols, use sign language or tactile signing, lip-read with Tadoma (placing their thumb on the speaker’s mouth) – and many more.

As part of Deadfblind Awareness Week, Deafblind UK is helping deafblind people take part in the online world. Through Skype, email and social media, deafblind people can overcome barriers that prevent them from leading full and interconnected lives. They can get in touch with friends and family, improve employability – even just waste time on Facebook! Or this blog…

So this week, when you’re chatting to your colleagues, or going on Twitter in your lunchbreak, try and remember that not everyone finds getting in touch so easy. Think of what your business or your school or community could do to make the lives of deafblind people easier. You could even, if you’ve got an old car lurking in your garage, choose to pledge your car to a deafblind charity. Your donation could really help a deafblind person feel connected.

One Way That Deafblind People Can Communicate

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Did you wake up this morning to the blissful sound of birdsong? Or, perhaps more likely, to the insistent, furious beeping of your alarm clock? Now replay the scene. Imagine getting up tomorrow and not being able to hear that beeping. Imagine not being able to see the light blazing through the window. Not being able to hear what your family says to you as you walk downstairs, or see the news on the television.

That’s how deafblind people live each day, every day. There are 356,000 deafblind people in the UK today, with different degrees of visual impairment and hearing difficulty. Around 220,000 of these people are over 70. Some of them were born with the condition. Some of them acquired it with age. But all of them share the stigma, barriers and daily struggles of not having full hearing and vision.

But let’s not be negative – thanks to new technology and the great work of charities like Deafblind UK and Sense, as well as the passion and positivity of people who are deafblind themselves, these barriers are being overcome.

One example of this is the most famous deafblind person to date, Helen Keller. Helen Keller was the first deafblind person to earn a BA degree, and she overcame the anger and frustration she experienced as a child made deafblind by a fever to help people with disabilities. Through the help of her tutor Anne Mansfield Sullivan, she learned how to communicate with others, write and read braille, and became a well-educated woman and a public advocate for deafblindness. She was also a prolific lecturer and political activist, and wrote no less than 12 books during her lifetime.

Since Helen’s death, rights and support for deafblind people has come on in leaps and bounds. Through the work of charity campaigns, deafblind people are able to get around, take part in their favourite hobbies, make friends and generally take part in ordinary, fulfilled lives. But there are still barriers.

One of the biggest is communication. Without full hearing or sight, it might seem to a person who isn’t deafblind that there’s no way of talking. But deafblind people communicate in lots of different ways. They use Braille, create symbols, use sign language or tactile signing, lip-read with Tadoma (placing their thumb on the speaker’s mouth) – and many more.

As part of Deadfblind Awareness Week, Deafblind UK is helping deafblind people take part in the online world. Through Skype, email and social media, deafblind people can overcome barriers that prevent them from leading full and interconnected lives. They can get in touch with friends and family, improve employability – even just waste time on Facebook! Or this blog…

So this week, when you’re chatting to your colleagues, or going on Twitter in your lunchbreak, try and remember that not everyone finds getting in touch so easy. Think of what your business or your school or community could do to make the lives of deafblind people easier. You could even, if you’ve got an old car lurking in your garage, choose to pledge your car to a deafblind charity. Your donation could really help a deafblind person feel connected.

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Did you wake up this morning to the blissful sound of birdsong? Or, perhaps more likely, to the insistent, furious beeping of your alarm clock? Now replay the scene. Imagine getting up tomorrow and not being able to hear that beeping. Imagine not being able to see the light blazing through the window. Not being able to hear what your family says to you as you walk downstairs, or see the news on the television.

That’s how deafblind people live each day, every day. There are 356,000 deafblind people in the UK today, with different degrees of visual impairment and hearing difficulty. Around 220,000 of these people are over 70. Some of them were born with the condition. Some of them acquired it with age. But all of them share the stigma, barriers and daily struggles of not having full hearing and vision.

But let’s not be negative – thanks to new technology and the great work of charities like Deafblind UK and Sense, as well as the passion and positivity of people who are deafblind themselves, these barriers are being overcome.

One example of this is the most famous deafblind person to date, Helen Keller. Helen Keller was the first deafblind person to earn a BA degree, and she overcame the anger and frustration she experienced as a child made deafblind by a fever to help people with disabilities. Through the help of her tutor Anne Mansfield Sullivan, she learned how to communicate with others, write and read braille, and became a well-educated woman and a public advocate for deafblindness. She was also a prolific lecturer and political activist, and wrote no less than 12 books during her lifetime.

Since Helen’s death, rights and support for deafblind people has come on in leaps and bounds. Through the work of charity campaigns, deafblind people are able to get around, take part in their favourite hobbies, make friends and generally take part in ordinary, fulfilled lives. But there are still barriers.

One of the biggest is communication. Without full hearing or sight, it might seem to a person who isn’t deafblind that there’s no way of talking. But deafblind people communicate in lots of different ways. They use Braille, create symbols, use sign language or tactile signing, lip-read with Tadoma (placing their thumb on the speaker’s mouth) – and many more.

As part of Deadfblind Awareness Week, Deafblind UK is helping deafblind people take part in the online world. Through Skype, email and social media, deafblind people can overcome barriers that prevent them from leading full and interconnected lives. They can get in touch with friends and family, improve employability – even just waste time on Facebook! Or this blog…

So this week, when you’re chatting to your colleagues, or going on Twitter in your lunchbreak, try and remember that not everyone finds getting in touch so easy. Think of what your business or your school or community could do to make the lives of deafblind people easier. You could even, if you’ve got an old car lurking in your garage, choose to pledge your car to a deafblind charity. Your donation could really help a deafblind person feel connected.

One Way That Deafblind People Can Communicate

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Did you wake up this morning to the blissful sound of birdsong? Or, perhaps more likely, to the insistent, furious beeping of your alarm clock? Now replay the scene. Imagine getting up tomorrow and not being able to hear that beeping. Imagine not being able to see the light blazing through the window. Not being able to hear what your family says to you as you walk downstairs, or see the news on the television.

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Did you wake up this morning to the blissful sound of birdsong? Or, perhaps more likely, to the insistent, furious beeping of your alarm clock? Now replay the scene. Imagine getting up tomorrow and not being able to hear that beeping. Imagine not being able to see the light blazing through the window. Not being able to hear what your family says to you as you walk downstairs, or see the news on the television.

That’s how deafblind people live each day, every day. There are 356,000 deafblind people in the UK today, with different degrees of visual impairment and hearing difficulty. Around 220,000 of these people are over 70. Some of them were born with the condition. Some of them acquired it with age. But all of them share the stigma, barriers and daily struggles of not having full hearing and vision.

But let’s not be negative – thanks to new technology and the great work of charities like Deafblind UK and Sense, as well as the passion and positivity of people who are deafblind themselves, these barriers are being overcome.

One example of this is the most famous deafblind person to date, Helen Keller. Helen Keller was the first deafblind person to earn a BA degree, and she overcame the anger and frustration she experienced as a child made deafblind by a fever to help people with disabilities. Through the help of her tutor Anne Mansfield Sullivan, she learned how to communicate with others, write and read braille, and became a well-educated woman and a public advocate for deafblindness. She was also a prolific lecturer and political activist, and wrote no less than 12 books during her lifetime.

Since Helen’s death, rights and support for deafblind people has come on in leaps and bounds. Through the work of charity campaigns, deafblind people are able to get around, take part in their favourite hobbies, make friends and generally take part in ordinary, fulfilled lives. But there are still barriers.

One of the biggest is communication. Without full hearing or sight, it might seem to a person who isn’t deafblind that there’s no way of talking. But deafblind people communicate in lots of different ways. They use Braille, create symbols, use sign language or tactile signing, lip-read with Tadoma (placing their thumb on the speaker’s mouth) – and many more.

As part of Deadfblind Awareness Week, Deafblind UK is helping deafblind people take part in the online world. Through Skype, email and social media, deafblind people can overcome barriers that prevent them from leading full and interconnected lives. They can get in touch with friends and family, improve employability – even just waste time on Facebook! Or this blog…

So this week, when you’re chatting to your colleagues, or going on Twitter in your lunchbreak, try and remember that not everyone finds getting in touch so easy. Think of what your business or your school or community could do to make the lives of deafblind people easier. You could even, if you’ve got an old car lurking in your garage, choose to pledge your car to a deafblind charity. Your donation could really help a deafblind person feel connected.

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Did you wake up this morning to the blissful sound of birdsong? Or, perhaps more likely, to the insistent, furious beeping of your alarm clock? Now replay the scene. Imagine getting up tomorrow and not being able to hear that beeping. Imagine not being able to see the light blazing through the window. Not being able to hear what your family says to you as you walk downstairs, or see the news on the television.

That’s how deafblind people live each day, every day. There are 356,000 deafblind people in the UK today, with different degrees of visual impairment and hearing difficulty. Around 220,000 of these people are over 70. Some of them were born with the condition. Some of them acquired it with age. But all of them share the stigma, barriers and daily struggles of not having full hearing and vision.

But let’s not be negative – thanks to new technology and the great work of charities like Deafblind UK and Sense, as well as the passion and positivity of people who are deafblind themselves, these barriers are being overcome.

One example of this is the most famous deafblind person to date, Helen Keller. Helen Keller was the first deafblind person to earn a BA degree, and she overcame the anger and frustration she experienced as a child made deafblind by a fever to help people with disabilities. Through the help of her tutor Anne Mansfield Sullivan, she learned how to communicate with others, write and read braille, and became a well-educated woman and a public advocate for deafblindness. She was also a prolific lecturer and political activist, and wrote no less than 12 books during her lifetime.

Since Helen’s death, rights and support for deafblind people has come on in leaps and bounds. Through the work of charity campaigns, deafblind people are able to get around, take part in their favourite hobbies, make friends and generally take part in ordinary, fulfilled lives. But there are still barriers.

One of the biggest is communication. Without full hearing or sight, it might seem to a person who isn’t deafblind that there’s no way of talking. But deafblind people communicate in lots of different ways. They use Braille, create symbols, use sign language or tactile signing, lip-read with Tadoma (placing their thumb on the speaker’s mouth) – and many more.

As part of Deadfblind Awareness Week, Deafblind UK is helping deafblind people take part in the online world. Through Skype, email and social media, deafblind people can overcome barriers that prevent them from leading full and interconnected lives. They can get in touch with friends and family, improve employability – even just waste time on Facebook! Or this blog…

So this week, when you’re chatting to your colleagues, or going on Twitter in your lunchbreak, try and remember that not everyone finds getting in touch so easy. Think of what your business or your school or community could do to make the lives of deafblind people easier. You could even, if you’ve got an old car lurking in your garage, choose to pledge your car to a deafblind charity. Your donation could really help a deafblind person feel connected.

One Way That Deafblind People Can Communicate

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Jun
21

Anyone For Tennis?

By admin

Trivia

It’s nearly Wimbledon Tennis fortnight! And as the players get ready to make their way onto the lawns, here are some interesting facts you might not know about Wimbledon …...

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It’s nearly Wimbledon Tennis fortnight! And as the players get ready to make their way onto the lawns, here are some interesting facts you might not know about Wimbledon …


1. Wimbledon wasn’t always about the tennis. In 1868, you’d be more likely to see hoops and croquet mallets than tennis rackets. The All-England Club, who founded Wimbledon Tennis, only introduced tennis in 1875. Even more weirdly, the only reason the tennis championships were introduced was to buy a pony-drawn roller for the croquet lawns. But by 1882, the club had realised they were onto a winner, and dropped croquet in favour of the more popular tennis.


2. Wimbledon wouldn’t be Wimbledon without the strawberries and cream. And they use a lot! On average, Wimbledon Tennis serves up over 28,000kg of fresh strawberries and 7000 litres of cream during two weeks of play. But did you know who first came up with the clever idea of mixing the two together? Way back in the 1500s, Cardinal Thomas Wolsey’s kitchen staff had the brainwave of serving up Wimbledon’s iconic dish to the 600 people that had to be fed each day at Hampton Court Palace. So, if you’re lucky enough to be going to the tennis this year - raise your Pimms and thank them!

3. Tennis has an interesting history. Most historians agree that tennis started way back in the 11th-12th Century by a bunch of monks in France. The name is said to originate from the French ‘Tenez’, which means ‘take this’. The game spread all over the country, and by the 16th Century it had reached England’s shores. But the man who can be credited with making the game like it is today is Major Walter Clopton Wingfield, who created his own version of lawn tennis in 1874 called Sphairistike, which is Greek for ball game. Since then, tennis has gone a long way – the court is no longer hourglass-shaped, and the rules have been altered – but Wingfield’s legacy lives on through the likes of Murray, Federer and Nadel.

4. What’s with the scoring system? Originally, love, 15, 30 and 40 came from a clock face, but 45 was too long to say. So what about love? It’s thought that love is not due to the French monks’ passionate natures, but comes from the l'oeuf, which is French for egg. (And before you ask, that’s NOT an excuse to start throwing eggs at the players when they don’t score. You might get arrested.)

5. One final thought – a record number of 16.9 million people tuned in to the Men’s Singles final last year. If just 10% donated their old car to charity, that could mean over a million vehicles going to help some great causes, including supporting sport in the UK. Who knows – maybe your car could help fund the next Murray!

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It’s nearly Wimbledon Tennis fortnight! And as the players get ready to make their way onto the lawns, here are some interesting facts you might not know about Wimbledon …


1. Wimbledon wasn’t always about the tennis. In 1868, you’d be more likely to see hoops and croquet mallets than tennis rackets. The All-England Club, who founded Wimbledon Tennis, only introduced tennis in 1875. Even more weirdly, the only reason the tennis championships were introduced was to buy a pony-drawn roller for the croquet lawns. But by 1882, the club had realised they were onto a winner, and dropped croquet in favour of the more popular tennis.

2. Wimbledon wouldn’t be Wimbledon without the strawberries and cream. And they use a lot! On average, Wimbledon Tennis serves up over 28,000kg of fresh strawberries and 7000 litres of cream during two weeks of play. But did you know who first came up with the clever idea of mixing the two together? Way back in the 1500s, Cardinal Thomas Wolsey’s kitchen staff had the brainwave of serving up Wimbledon’s iconic dish to the 600 people that had to be fed each day at Hampton Court Palace. So, if you’re lucky enough to be going to the tennis this year - raise your Pimms and thank them!

3. Tennis has an interesting history. Most historians agree that tennis started way back in the 11th-12th Century by a bunch of monks in France. The name is said to originate from the French ‘Tenez’, which means ‘take this’. The game spread all over the country, and by the 16th Century it had reached England’s shores. But the man who can be credited with making the game like it is today is Major Walter Clopton Wingfield, who created his own version of lawn tennis in 1874 called Sphairistike, which is Greek for ball game. Since then, tennis has gone a long way – the court is no longer hourglass-shaped, and the rules have been altered – but Wingfield’s legacy lives on through the likes of Murray, Federer and Nadel.

4. What’s with the scoring system? Originally, love, 15, 30 and 40 came from a clock face, but 45 was too long to say. So what about love? It’s thought that love is not due to the French monks’ passionate natures, but comes from the l'oeuf, which is French for egg. (And before you ask, that’s NOT an excuse to start throwing eggs at the players when they don’t score. You might get arrested.)

5. One final thought – a record number of 16.9 million people tuned in to the Men’s Singles final last year. If just 10% donated their old car to charity, that could mean over a million vehicles going to help some great causes, including supporting sport in the UK. Who knows – maybe your car could help fund the next Murray!

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It’s nearly Wimbledon Tennis fortnight! And as the players get ready to make their way onto the lawns, here are some interesting facts you might not know about Wimbledon …


1. Wimbledon wasn’t always about the tennis. In 1868, you’d be more likely to see hoops and croquet mallets than tennis rackets. The All-England Club, who founded Wimbledon Tennis, only introduced tennis in 1875. Even more weirdly, the only reason the tennis championships were introduced was to buy a pony-drawn roller for the croquet lawns. But by 1882, the club had realised they were onto a winner, and dropped croquet in favour of the more popular tennis.


2. Wimbledon wouldn’t be Wimbledon without the strawberries and cream. And they use a lot! On average, Wimbledon Tennis serves up over 28,000kg of fresh strawberries and 7000 litres of cream during two weeks of play. But did you know who first came up with the clever idea of mixing the two together? Way back in the 1500s, Cardinal Thomas Wolsey’s kitchen staff had the brainwave of serving up Wimbledon’s iconic dish to the 600 people that had to be fed each day at Hampton Court Palace. So, if you’re lucky enough to be going to the tennis this year - raise your Pimms and thank them!

3. Tennis has an interesting history. Most historians agree that tennis started way back in the 11th-12th Century by a bunch of monks in France. The name is said to originate from the French ‘Tenez’, which means ‘take this’. The game spread all over the country, and by the 16th Century it had reached England’s shores. But the man who can be credited with making the game like it is today is Major Walter Clopton Wingfield, who created his own version of lawn tennis in 1874 called Sphairistike, which is Greek for ball game. Since then, tennis has gone a long way – the court is no longer hourglass-shaped, and the rules have been altered – but Wingfield’s legacy lives on through the likes of Murray, Federer and Nadel.

4. What’s with the scoring system? Originally, love, 15, 30 and 40 came from a clock face, but 45 was too long to say. So what about love? It’s thought that love is not due to the French monks’ passionate natures, but comes from the l'oeuf, which is French for egg. (And before you ask, that’s NOT an excuse to start throwing eggs at the players when they don’t score. You might get arrested.)

5. One final thought – a record number of 16.9 million people tuned in to the Men’s Singles final last year. If just 10% donated their old car to charity, that could mean over a million vehicles going to help some great causes, including supporting sport in the UK. Who knows – maybe your car could help fund the next Murray!

[summary] => [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>


It’s nearly Wimbledon Tennis fortnight! And as the players get ready to make their way onto the lawns, here are some interesting facts you might not know about Wimbledon …


1. Wimbledon wasn’t always about the tennis. In 1868, you’d be more likely to see hoops and croquet mallets than tennis rackets. The All-England Club, who founded Wimbledon Tennis, only introduced tennis in 1875. Even more weirdly, the only reason the tennis championships were introduced was to buy a pony-drawn roller for the croquet lawns. But by 1882, the club had realised they were onto a winner, and dropped croquet in favour of the more popular tennis.

2. Wimbledon wouldn’t be Wimbledon without the strawberries and cream. And they use a lot! On average, Wimbledon Tennis serves up over 28,000kg of fresh strawberries and 7000 litres of cream during two weeks of play. But did you know who first came up with the clever idea of mixing the two together? Way back in the 1500s, Cardinal Thomas Wolsey’s kitchen staff had the brainwave of serving up Wimbledon’s iconic dish to the 600 people that had to be fed each day at Hampton Court Palace. So, if you’re lucky enough to be going to the tennis this year - raise your Pimms and thank them!

3. Tennis has an interesting history. Most historians agree that tennis started way back in the 11th-12th Century by a bunch of monks in France. The name is said to originate from the French ‘Tenez’, which means ‘take this’. The game spread all over the country, and by the 16th Century it had reached England’s shores. But the man who can be credited with making the game like it is today is Major Walter Clopton Wingfield, who created his own version of lawn tennis in 1874 called Sphairistike, which is Greek for ball game. Since then, tennis has gone a long way – the court is no longer hourglass-shaped, and the rules have been altered – but Wingfield’s legacy lives on through the likes of Murray, Federer and Nadel.

4. What’s with the scoring system? Originally, love, 15, 30 and 40 came from a clock face, but 45 was too long to say. So what about love? It’s thought that love is not due to the French monks’ passionate natures, but comes from the l'oeuf, which is French for egg. (And before you ask, that’s NOT an excuse to start throwing eggs at the players when they don’t score. You might get arrested.)

5. One final thought – a record number of 16.9 million people tuned in to the Men’s Singles final last year. If just 10% donated their old car to charity, that could mean over a million vehicles going to help some great causes, including supporting sport in the UK. Who knows – maybe your car could help fund the next Murray!

[safe_summary] => ) ) [#formatter] => text_summary_or_trimmed [0] => Array ( [#markup] =>


It’s nearly Wimbledon Tennis fortnight! And as the players get ready to make their way onto the lawns, here are some interesting facts you might not know about Wimbledon …

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It’s nearly Wimbledon Tennis fortnight! And as the players get ready to make their way onto the lawns, here are some interesting facts you might not know about Wimbledon …


1. Wimbledon wasn’t always about the tennis. In 1868, you’d be more likely to see hoops and croquet mallets than tennis rackets. The All-England Club, who founded Wimbledon Tennis, only introduced tennis in 1875. Even more weirdly, the only reason the tennis championships were introduced was to buy a pony-drawn roller for the croquet lawns. But by 1882, the club had realised they were onto a winner, and dropped croquet in favour of the more popular tennis.


2. Wimbledon wouldn’t be Wimbledon without the strawberries and cream. And they use a lot! On average, Wimbledon Tennis serves up over 28,000kg of fresh strawberries and 7000 litres of cream during two weeks of play. But did you know who first came up with the clever idea of mixing the two together? Way back in the 1500s, Cardinal Thomas Wolsey’s kitchen staff had the brainwave of serving up Wimbledon’s iconic dish to the 600 people that had to be fed each day at Hampton Court Palace. So, if you’re lucky enough to be going to the tennis this year - raise your Pimms and thank them!

3. Tennis has an interesting history. Most historians agree that tennis started way back in the 11th-12th Century by a bunch of monks in France. The name is said to originate from the French ‘Tenez’, which means ‘take this’. The game spread all over the country, and by the 16th Century it had reached England’s shores. But the man who can be credited with making the game like it is today is Major Walter Clopton Wingfield, who created his own version of lawn tennis in 1874 called Sphairistike, which is Greek for ball game. Since then, tennis has gone a long way – the court is no longer hourglass-shaped, and the rules have been altered – but Wingfield’s legacy lives on through the likes of Murray, Federer and Nadel.

4. What’s with the scoring system? Originally, love, 15, 30 and 40 came from a clock face, but 45 was too long to say. So what about love? It’s thought that love is not due to the French monks’ passionate natures, but comes from the l'oeuf, which is French for egg. (And before you ask, that’s NOT an excuse to start throwing eggs at the players when they don’t score. You might get arrested.)

5. One final thought – a record number of 16.9 million people tuned in to the Men’s Singles final last year. If just 10% donated their old car to charity, that could mean over a million vehicles going to help some great causes, including supporting sport in the UK. Who knows – maybe your car could help fund the next Murray!

[summary] => [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>


It’s nearly Wimbledon Tennis fortnight! And as the players get ready to make their way onto the lawns, here are some interesting facts you might not know about Wimbledon …


1. Wimbledon wasn’t always about the tennis. In 1868, you’d be more likely to see hoops and croquet mallets than tennis rackets. The All-England Club, who founded Wimbledon Tennis, only introduced tennis in 1875. Even more weirdly, the only reason the tennis championships were introduced was to buy a pony-drawn roller for the croquet lawns. But by 1882, the club had realised they were onto a winner, and dropped croquet in favour of the more popular tennis.

2. Wimbledon wouldn’t be Wimbledon without the strawberries and cream. And they use a lot! On average, Wimbledon Tennis serves up over 28,000kg of fresh strawberries and 7000 litres of cream during two weeks of play. But did you know who first came up with the clever idea of mixing the two together? Way back in the 1500s, Cardinal Thomas Wolsey’s kitchen staff had the brainwave of serving up Wimbledon’s iconic dish to the 600 people that had to be fed each day at Hampton Court Palace. So, if you’re lucky enough to be going to the tennis this year - raise your Pimms and thank them!

3. Tennis has an interesting history. Most historians agree that tennis started way back in the 11th-12th Century by a bunch of monks in France. The name is said to originate from the French ‘Tenez’, which means ‘take this’. The game spread all over the country, and by the 16th Century it had reached England’s shores. But the man who can be credited with making the game like it is today is Major Walter Clopton Wingfield, who created his own version of lawn tennis in 1874 called Sphairistike, which is Greek for ball game. Since then, tennis has gone a long way – the court is no longer hourglass-shaped, and the rules have been altered – but Wingfield’s legacy lives on through the likes of Murray, Federer and Nadel.

4. What’s with the scoring system? Originally, love, 15, 30 and 40 came from a clock face, but 45 was too long to say. So what about love? It’s thought that love is not due to the French monks’ passionate natures, but comes from the l'oeuf, which is French for egg. (And before you ask, that’s NOT an excuse to start throwing eggs at the players when they don’t score. You might get arrested.)

5. One final thought – a record number of 16.9 million people tuned in to the Men’s Singles final last year. If just 10% donated their old car to charity, that could mean over a million vehicles going to help some great causes, including supporting sport in the UK. Who knows – maybe your car could help fund the next Murray!

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Jun
14

Recycle Week

By admin

Trivia

What actually happens when your car is recycled? ...

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Question: What do all of these things have in common?

Answer: they can all be made from this:

17th-23rd of June is Recycle Week, so in preparation we thought we’d take a look at what actually happens to old cars when they go to be scrapped, and the surprisingly interesting objects they become.

Scrapping a car is a mysterious process for most people. Often the image of a sky-high stack of crushed bangers leaps to mind, but we have no concept of what follows. How is the old rusty heap that you just donated to charity transformed into one of the exciting objects above? Well, it goes something like this:

1. The battery is taken out.
The components are separated to leave plastic chips and a lead paste, which then continue life as…new car batteries!

2. The air bags are let off and the tyres are removed.
Old tyres can be used for a number of things; they might be re-treaded or – far more excitingly – turned into flip flops, shoes or roof slates.

3. Hazardous materials (mercury switches, brake fluid, waste oil, petrol/diesel) are removed, preventing them from leaking into the environment and causing untold damage. (This is why it’s so important to have your car recycled properly).

4. Specialist parts, such as the catalytic converter, are removed.
Catalytic converters are full of precious metals – platinum, rhodium and palladium – making them very valuable in industry. They could become anything from new catalytic converters to iPads and mobile phones.

5. The last things to be removed are the glass parts and plastic elements. Again, these are all sent to be recycled, giving you glass bottles, kitchen worktops, tiles, ornaments, earrings…the list goes on.

6. The now stripped down car shell heads to the shredder, where it is turned into brick-sized chunks and shipped off all over the world for use in new products. It’s far more economical to recycle steel than it is to produce brand new materials, so old cars are very popular. They can become anything, from steel building structures to table cutlery.

So there you have it. Who knew that an old car could do so much?

[summary] => What actually happens when your car is recycled? [format] => filtered_html [safe_value] =>

Question: What do all of these things have in common?

Answer: they can all be made from this:

17th-23rd of June is Recycle Week, so in preparation we thought we’d take a look at what actually happens to old cars when they go to be scrapped, and the surprisingly interesting objects they become.
Scrapping a car is a mysterious process for most people. Often the image of a sky-high stack of crushed bangers leaps to mind, but we have no concept of what follows. How is the old rusty heap that you just donated to charity transformed into one of the exciting objects above? Well, it goes something like this:

1. The battery is taken out.

The components are separated to leave plastic chips and a lead paste, which then continue life as…new car batteries!

2. The air bags are let off and the tyres are removed.

Old tyres can be used for a number of things; they might be re-treaded or – far more excitingly – turned into flip flops, shoes or roof slates.

3. Hazardous materials (mercury switches, brake fluid, waste oil, petrol/diesel) are removed, preventing them from leaking into the environment and causing untold damage. (This is why it’s so important to have your car recycled properly).

4. Specialist parts, such as the catalytic converter, are removed.

Catalytic converters are full of precious metals – platinum, rhodium and palladium – making them very valuable in industry. They could become anything from new catalytic converters to iPads and mobile phones.

5. The last things to be removed are the glass parts and plastic elements. Again, these are all sent to be recycled, giving you glass bottles, kitchen worktops, tiles, ornaments, earrings…the list goes on.

6. The now stripped down car shell heads to the shredder, where it is turned into brick-sized chunks and shipped off all over the world for use in new products. It’s far more economical to recycle steel than it is to produce brand new materials, so old cars are very popular. They can become anything, from steel building structures to table cutlery.

So there you have it. Who knew that an old car could do so much?

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What actually happens when your car is recycled?

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Question: What do all of these things have in common?

Answer: they can all be made from this:

17th-23rd of June is Recycle Week, so in preparation we thought we’d take a look at what actually happens to old cars when they go to be scrapped, and the surprisingly interesting objects they become.

Scrapping a car is a mysterious process for most people. Often the image of a sky-high stack of crushed bangers leaps to mind, but we have no concept of what follows. How is the old rusty heap that you just donated to charity transformed into one of the exciting objects above? Well, it goes something like this:

1. The battery is taken out.
The components are separated to leave plastic chips and a lead paste, which then continue life as…new car batteries!

2. The air bags are let off and the tyres are removed.
Old tyres can be used for a number of things; they might be re-treaded or – far more excitingly – turned into flip flops, shoes or roof slates.

3. Hazardous materials (mercury switches, brake fluid, waste oil, petrol/diesel) are removed, preventing them from leaking into the environment and causing untold damage. (This is why it’s so important to have your car recycled properly).

4. Specialist parts, such as the catalytic converter, are removed.
Catalytic converters are full of precious metals – platinum, rhodium and palladium – making them very valuable in industry. They could become anything from new catalytic converters to iPads and mobile phones.

5. The last things to be removed are the glass parts and plastic elements. Again, these are all sent to be recycled, giving you glass bottles, kitchen worktops, tiles, ornaments, earrings…the list goes on.

6. The now stripped down car shell heads to the shredder, where it is turned into brick-sized chunks and shipped off all over the world for use in new products. It’s far more economical to recycle steel than it is to produce brand new materials, so old cars are very popular. They can become anything, from steel building structures to table cutlery.

So there you have it. Who knew that an old car could do so much?

[summary] => What actually happens when your car is recycled? [format] => filtered_html [safe_value] =>

Question: What do all of these things have in common?

Answer: they can all be made from this:

17th-23rd of June is Recycle Week, so in preparation we thought we’d take a look at what actually happens to old cars when they go to be scrapped, and the surprisingly interesting objects they become.
Scrapping a car is a mysterious process for most people. Often the image of a sky-high stack of crushed bangers leaps to mind, but we have no concept of what follows. How is the old rusty heap that you just donated to charity transformed into one of the exciting objects above? Well, it goes something like this:

1. The battery is taken out.

The components are separated to leave plastic chips and a lead paste, which then continue life as…new car batteries!

2. The air bags are let off and the tyres are removed.

Old tyres can be used for a number of things; they might be re-treaded or – far more excitingly – turned into flip flops, shoes or roof slates.

3. Hazardous materials (mercury switches, brake fluid, waste oil, petrol/diesel) are removed, preventing them from leaking into the environment and causing untold damage. (This is why it’s so important to have your car recycled properly).

4. Specialist parts, such as the catalytic converter, are removed.

Catalytic converters are full of precious metals – platinum, rhodium and palladium – making them very valuable in industry. They could become anything from new catalytic converters to iPads and mobile phones.

5. The last things to be removed are the glass parts and plastic elements. Again, these are all sent to be recycled, giving you glass bottles, kitchen worktops, tiles, ornaments, earrings…the list goes on.

6. The now stripped down car shell heads to the shredder, where it is turned into brick-sized chunks and shipped off all over the world for use in new products. It’s far more economical to recycle steel than it is to produce brand new materials, so old cars are very popular. They can become anything, from steel building structures to table cutlery.

So there you have it. Who knew that an old car could do so much?

[safe_summary] =>

What actually happens when your car is recycled?

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What actually happens when your car is recycled?

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Question: What do all of these things have in common?

Answer: they can all be made from this:

17th-23rd of June is Recycle Week, so in preparation we thought we’d take a look at what actually happens to old cars when they go to be scrapped, and the surprisingly interesting objects they become.

Scrapping a car is a mysterious process for most people. Often the image of a sky-high stack of crushed bangers leaps to mind, but we have no concept of what follows. How is the old rusty heap that you just donated to charity transformed into one of the exciting objects above? Well, it goes something like this:

1. The battery is taken out.
The components are separated to leave plastic chips and a lead paste, which then continue life as…new car batteries!

2. The air bags are let off and the tyres are removed.
Old tyres can be used for a number of things; they might be re-treaded or – far more excitingly – turned into flip flops, shoes or roof slates.

3. Hazardous materials (mercury switches, brake fluid, waste oil, petrol/diesel) are removed, preventing them from leaking into the environment and causing untold damage. (This is why it’s so important to have your car recycled properly).

4. Specialist parts, such as the catalytic converter, are removed.
Catalytic converters are full of precious metals – platinum, rhodium and palladium – making them very valuable in industry. They could become anything from new catalytic converters to iPads and mobile phones.

5. The last things to be removed are the glass parts and plastic elements. Again, these are all sent to be recycled, giving you glass bottles, kitchen worktops, tiles, ornaments, earrings…the list goes on.

6. The now stripped down car shell heads to the shredder, where it is turned into brick-sized chunks and shipped off all over the world for use in new products. It’s far more economical to recycle steel than it is to produce brand new materials, so old cars are very popular. They can become anything, from steel building structures to table cutlery.

So there you have it. Who knew that an old car could do so much?

[summary] => What actually happens when your car is recycled? [format] => filtered_html [safe_value] =>

Question: What do all of these things have in common?

Answer: they can all be made from this:

17th-23rd of June is Recycle Week, so in preparation we thought we’d take a look at what actually happens to old cars when they go to be scrapped, and the surprisingly interesting objects they become.
Scrapping a car is a mysterious process for most people. Often the image of a sky-high stack of crushed bangers leaps to mind, but we have no concept of what follows. How is the old rusty heap that you just donated to charity transformed into one of the exciting objects above? Well, it goes something like this:

1. The battery is taken out.

The components are separated to leave plastic chips and a lead paste, which then continue life as…new car batteries!

2. The air bags are let off and the tyres are removed.

Old tyres can be used for a number of things; they might be re-treaded or – far more excitingly – turned into flip flops, shoes or roof slates.

3. Hazardous materials (mercury switches, brake fluid, waste oil, petrol/diesel) are removed, preventing them from leaking into the environment and causing untold damage. (This is why it’s so important to have your car recycled properly).

4. Specialist parts, such as the catalytic converter, are removed.

Catalytic converters are full of precious metals – platinum, rhodium and palladium – making them very valuable in industry. They could become anything from new catalytic converters to iPads and mobile phones.

5. The last things to be removed are the glass parts and plastic elements. Again, these are all sent to be recycled, giving you glass bottles, kitchen worktops, tiles, ornaments, earrings…the list goes on.

6. The now stripped down car shell heads to the shredder, where it is turned into brick-sized chunks and shipped off all over the world for use in new products. It’s far more economical to recycle steel than it is to produce brand new materials, so old cars are very popular. They can become anything, from steel building structures to table cutlery.

So there you have it. Who knew that an old car could do so much?

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What actually happens when your car is recycled?

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Jun
7

Travel Games

By admin

What’s this? The sun’s blazing through your office window, people are wearing flip flops and sunglasses rather than thermal underwear, men think it’s suddenly OK to be topless in public… yes, that all elusive British summer is finally here. And with the traditional British summer comes sunburn, hayfever, nightmare Tube journeys with your face shoved in someone else's sweaty armpit and … Summer holidays!...

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What’s this? The sun’s blazing through your office window, people are wearing flip flops and sunglasses rather than thermal underwear, men think it’s suddenly OK to be topless in public… yes, that all elusive British summer is finally here. And with the traditional British summer comes sunburn, hayfever, nightmare Tube journeys with your face shoved in someone else's sweaty armpit and … Summer holidays!

Have you planned yours yet? Chances are, with economic times the way they are, you might have decided to ditch the Caribbean getaway this year and stay in the UK. Which most likely means driving. And, especially if you have small children, your worst nightmare.

So, how will you keep everyone entertained? Forget I-Spy – here are some more interesting/unusual/downright weird games you can play to stop everyone killing each other...

1. Intimidate a Sheep

Forget counting. Why not try interacting with your fellow creatures by glaring angrily at them? This can be quite challenging when you’re driving up a motorway at 70 miles an hour, but when you’re stuck in traffic, it’s easy to eyeball your target from afar. If the sheep moves before you blink, you win. If you blink, the sheep is either asleep, stuffed or has wool of steel…

2. Shopping Game… With a Twist

Most people know this one – The first person says, “I went shopping and I bought… an apple”, then the next person says” I went shopping and I bought… an apple and a banana” and so on all the way through the alphabet. So mix it up a bit – as well as remembering what someone bought, you’ve also got to say WHY they bought it – the weirder the better. E.g. “I went shopping and I bought an apple and a banana because I wanted to trip people up in the street.”

3. Rate the Service Station

Chances are, you’ll be making several stops along the way. But don’t just dash in and out. Take your time. Sample the coffee. Inspect the toilets. Visit the shop – are the staff helpful? Can they answer extremely complex/ridiculous questions? How accessible is the car par? Rate the scenery. At the end, give marks out of ten and vote for the best.

4. Have a Surreal Argument

Driving from London to Scotland with four under 10s and two frazzled adults is bound to lead to friction. So why not make it fun? Make a rule that you’re only allowed to argue saying sentences backwards, or in the voice of Nigella Lawson: ‘You’re always stopping me drizzling cream all over my gorgeous plums…’ *sexy voice* (Warning – drivers should stay out of this one. They need their wits for the road.)

5. If all else fails… How Quiet Can You Be Before The Road Dragons Eat You?

If you've managed to read this far, your children are probably STILL not amused and currently starting WWIII at the back of your car. To ease the frustration, why not scare them into submission? It’s a little known fact that beneath most major roadways in the UK lie some of the most fearsome road dragons, who can easily be awakened by noisy children/immature adults. Be as quiet as possible. The winner/s stay alive. You don’t want to know what happens to the losers…

[summary] => [format] => filtered_html [safe_value] =>

What’s this? The sun’s blazing through your office window, people are wearing flip flops and sunglasses rather than thermal underwear, men think it’s suddenly OK to be topless in public… yes, that all elusive British summer is finally here. And with the traditional British summer comes sunburn, hayfever, nightmare Tube journeys with your face shoved in someone else's sweaty armpit and … Summer holidays!

Have you planned yours yet? Chances are, with economic times the way they are, you might have decided to ditch the Caribbean getaway this year and stay in the UK. Which most likely means driving. And, especially if you have small children, your worst nightmare.

So, how will you keep everyone entertained? Forget I-Spy – here are some more interesting/unusual/downright weird games you can play to stop everyone killing each other...

1. Intimidate a Sheep
Forget counting. Why not try interacting with your fellow creatures by glaring angrily at them? This can be quite challenging when you’re driving up a motorway at 70 miles an hour, but when you’re stuck in traffic, it’s easy to eyeball your target from afar. If the sheep moves before you blink, you win. If you blink, the sheep is either asleep, stuffed or has wool of steel…

2. Shopping Game… With a Twist
Most people know this one – The first person says, “I went shopping and I bought… an apple”, then the next person says” I went shopping and I bought… an apple and a banana” and so on all the way through the alphabet. So mix it up a bit – as well as remembering what someone bought, you’ve also got to say WHY they bought it – the weirder the better. E.g. “I went shopping and I bought an apple and a banana because I wanted to trip people up in the street.”

3. Rate the Service Station
Chances are, you’ll be making several stops along the way. But don’t just dash in and out. Take your time. Sample the coffee. Inspect the toilets. Visit the shop – are the staff helpful? Can they answer extremely complex/ridiculous questions? How accessible is the car par? Rate the scenery. At the end, give marks out of ten and vote for the best.

4. Have a Surreal Argument
Driving from London to Scotland with four under 10s and two frazzled adults is bound to lead to friction. So why not make it fun? Make a rule that you’re only allowed to argue saying sentences backwards, or in the voice of Nigella Lawson: ‘You’re always stopping me drizzling cream all over my gorgeous plums…’ *sexy voice* (Warning – drivers should stay out of this one. They need their wits for the road.)

5. If all else fails… How Quiet Can You Be Before The Road Dragons Eat You?
If you've managed to read this far, your children are probably STILL not amused and currently starting WWIII at the back of your car. To ease the frustration, why not scare them into submission? It’s a little known fact that beneath most major roadways in the UK lie some of the most fearsome road dragons, who can easily be awakened by noisy children/immature adults. Be as quiet as possible. The winner/s stay alive. You don’t want to know what happens to the losers…

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What’s this? The sun’s blazing through your office window, people are wearing flip flops and sunglasses rather than thermal underwear, men think it’s suddenly OK to be topless in public… yes, that all elusive British summer is finally here. And with the traditional British summer comes sunburn, hayfever, nightmare Tube journeys with your face shoved in someone else's sweaty armpit and … Summer holidays!

Have you planned yours yet? Chances are, with economic times the way they are, you might have decided to ditch the Caribbean getaway this year and stay in the UK. Which most likely means driving. And, especially if you have small children, your worst nightmare.

So, how will you keep everyone entertained? Forget I-Spy – here are some more interesting/unusual/downright weird games you can play to stop everyone killing each other...

1. Intimidate a Sheep

Forget counting. Why not try interacting with your fellow creatures by glaring angrily at them? This can be quite challenging when you’re driving up a motorway at 70 miles an hour, but when you’re stuck in traffic, it’s easy to eyeball your target from afar. If the sheep moves before you blink, you win. If you blink, the sheep is either asleep, stuffed or has wool of steel…

2. Shopping Game… With a Twist

Most people know this one – The first person says, “I went shopping and I bought… an apple”, then the next person says” I went shopping and I bought… an apple and a banana” and so on all the way through the alphabet. So mix it up a bit – as well as remembering what someone bought, you’ve also got to say WHY they bought it – the weirder the better. E.g. “I went shopping and I bought an apple and a banana because I wanted to trip people up in the street.”

3. Rate the Service Station

Chances are, you’ll be making several stops along the way. But don’t just dash in and out. Take your time. Sample the coffee. Inspect the toilets. Visit the shop – are the staff helpful? Can they answer extremely complex/ridiculous questions? How accessible is the car par? Rate the scenery. At the end, give marks out of ten and vote for the best.

4. Have a Surreal Argument

Driving from London to Scotland with four under 10s and two frazzled adults is bound to lead to friction. So why not make it fun? Make a rule that you’re only allowed to argue saying sentences backwards, or in the voice of Nigella Lawson: ‘You’re always stopping me drizzling cream all over my gorgeous plums…’ *sexy voice* (Warning – drivers should stay out of this one. They need their wits for the road.)

5. If all else fails… How Quiet Can You Be Before The Road Dragons Eat You?

If you've managed to read this far, your children are probably STILL not amused and currently starting WWIII at the back of your car. To ease the frustration, why not scare them into submission? It’s a little known fact that beneath most major roadways in the UK lie some of the most fearsome road dragons, who can easily be awakened by noisy children/immature adults. Be as quiet as possible. The winner/s stay alive. You don’t want to know what happens to the losers…

[summary] => [format] => filtered_html [safe_value] =>

What’s this? The sun’s blazing through your office window, people are wearing flip flops and sunglasses rather than thermal underwear, men think it’s suddenly OK to be topless in public… yes, that all elusive British summer is finally here. And with the traditional British summer comes sunburn, hayfever, nightmare Tube journeys with your face shoved in someone else's sweaty armpit and … Summer holidays!

Have you planned yours yet? Chances are, with economic times the way they are, you might have decided to ditch the Caribbean getaway this year and stay in the UK. Which most likely means driving. And, especially if you have small children, your worst nightmare.

So, how will you keep everyone entertained? Forget I-Spy – here are some more interesting/unusual/downright weird games you can play to stop everyone killing each other...

1. Intimidate a Sheep
Forget counting. Why not try interacting with your fellow creatures by glaring angrily at them? This can be quite challenging when you’re driving up a motorway at 70 miles an hour, but when you’re stuck in traffic, it’s easy to eyeball your target from afar. If the sheep moves before you blink, you win. If you blink, the sheep is either asleep, stuffed or has wool of steel…

2. Shopping Game… With a Twist
Most people know this one – The first person says, “I went shopping and I bought… an apple”, then the next person says” I went shopping and I bought… an apple and a banana” and so on all the way through the alphabet. So mix it up a bit – as well as remembering what someone bought, you’ve also got to say WHY they bought it – the weirder the better. E.g. “I went shopping and I bought an apple and a banana because I wanted to trip people up in the street.”

3. Rate the Service Station
Chances are, you’ll be making several stops along the way. But don’t just dash in and out. Take your time. Sample the coffee. Inspect the toilets. Visit the shop – are the staff helpful? Can they answer extremely complex/ridiculous questions? How accessible is the car par? Rate the scenery. At the end, give marks out of ten and vote for the best.

4. Have a Surreal Argument
Driving from London to Scotland with four under 10s and two frazzled adults is bound to lead to friction. So why not make it fun? Make a rule that you’re only allowed to argue saying sentences backwards, or in the voice of Nigella Lawson: ‘You’re always stopping me drizzling cream all over my gorgeous plums…’ *sexy voice* (Warning – drivers should stay out of this one. They need their wits for the road.)

5. If all else fails… How Quiet Can You Be Before The Road Dragons Eat You?
If you've managed to read this far, your children are probably STILL not amused and currently starting WWIII at the back of your car. To ease the frustration, why not scare them into submission? It’s a little known fact that beneath most major roadways in the UK lie some of the most fearsome road dragons, who can easily be awakened by noisy children/immature adults. Be as quiet as possible. The winner/s stay alive. You don’t want to know what happens to the losers…

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What’s this? The sun’s blazing through your office window, people are wearing flip flops and sunglasses rather than thermal underwear, men think it’s suddenly OK to be topless in public… yes, that all elusive British summer is finally here. And with the traditional British summer comes sunburn, hayfever, nightmare Tube journeys with your face shoved in someone else's sweaty armpit and … Summer holidays!

) ) )
Jun
3

Charity Anagrams

By admin

Charities Trivia

Distract yourself with some word game fun ...

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Fancy a little distraction? Enjoy word games? Why not try and figure out which charities these anagrams are referring to:



1. Archer car scene
2. Wow a hidden twinkle thug
3. Core testifiers
4. Radar snob
5. Song must
6. Ecstatic proton
7. A salami pen worm
8. My lions conditions
9. A tropic crumple clansman
10. No wallets

Tweet us @giveacar if you think you've got them all!

[summary] => Distract yourself with some word game fun [format] => filtered_html [safe_value] =>

Fancy a little distraction? Enjoy word games? Why not try and figure out which charities these anagrams are referring to:

1. Archer car scene

2. Wow a hidden twinkle thug

3. Core testifiers

4. Radar snob

5. Song must

6. Ecstatic proton

7. A salami pen worm

8. My lions conditions

9. A tropic crumple clansman

10. No wallets

Tweet us @giveacar if you think you've got them all!

[safe_summary] =>

Distract yourself with some word game fun

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Fancy a little distraction? Enjoy word games? Why not try and figure out which charities these anagrams are referring to:



1. Archer car scene
2. Wow a hidden twinkle thug
3. Core testifiers
4. Radar snob
5. Song must
6. Ecstatic proton
7. A salami pen worm
8. My lions conditions
9. A tropic crumple clansman
10. No wallets

Tweet us @giveacar if you think you've got them all!

[summary] => Distract yourself with some word game fun [format] => filtered_html [safe_value] =>

Fancy a little distraction? Enjoy word games? Why not try and figure out which charities these anagrams are referring to:

1. Archer car scene

2. Wow a hidden twinkle thug

3. Core testifiers

4. Radar snob

5. Song must

6. Ecstatic proton

7. A salami pen worm

8. My lions conditions

9. A tropic crumple clansman

10. No wallets

Tweet us @giveacar if you think you've got them all!

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Distract yourself with some word game fun

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Distract yourself with some word game fun

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Fancy a little distraction? Enjoy word games? Why not try and figure out which charities these anagrams are referring to:



1. Archer car scene
2. Wow a hidden twinkle thug
3. Core testifiers
4. Radar snob
5. Song must
6. Ecstatic proton
7. A salami pen worm
8. My lions conditions
9. A tropic crumple clansman
10. No wallets

Tweet us @giveacar if you think you've got them all!

[summary] => Distract yourself with some word game fun [format] => filtered_html [safe_value] =>

Fancy a little distraction? Enjoy word games? Why not try and figure out which charities these anagrams are referring to:

1. Archer car scene

2. Wow a hidden twinkle thug

3. Core testifiers

4. Radar snob

5. Song must

6. Ecstatic proton

7. A salami pen worm

8. My lions conditions

9. A tropic crumple clansman

10. No wallets

Tweet us @giveacar if you think you've got them all!

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Distract yourself with some word game fun

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May
24

A Trip Down Memory Lane

By admin

Trivia

Ever think about the iconic cars that played a part in your childhood? Here are ten of our favourites. Cue severe onset of nostalgia. ...

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Ever think about the iconic cars that played a part in your childhood? Here are ten of our favourites. Cue severe onset of nostalgia.


Postman Pat’s post van

As the lyrics to the theme tune so aptly state, ‘Everybody knows his bright red van’. Having graced our screens since 1981, Postman Pat and his trusty companion Jess are familiar characters, and the little red post van no less so. It often stars in episodes, whether because a magpie has stolen the keys, a hen has laid an egg inside or it gets stuck in mud.


Brum

This little yellow car first appeared in 1991 and entertained many with his adventures across the city of Birmingham. The half-scale replica of a late 1920s Austin 7 never spoke, but communicated by opening and closing doors, bobbing up and down on his suspension, flashing his headlights and beeping his horn. A car close to our hearts after he narrowly avoids being scrapped in the first series.



The Flintstones

As with all of their technology, the Flintstones’ car was ingeniously fashioned out of prehistoric materials. The stone, wood and animal skin creation was powered by the feet of its passengers, and could move surprisingly fast when necessary. Since 1960, this vehicle has taken the meaning of ‘classic car’ to a new level.


Noddy’s Taxi

Toyland’s most infamous resident would be incomplete without his vehicle; even the theme tune introduces Noddy as ‘the little man with the red and yellow car’. Based on the books written by Enid Blyton, this little car has been whizzing around our screens since 1955, providing a taxi service for the residents of Toytown. Noddy’s driving is arguably a little haphazard, but he’s much-loved all the same.


The Mean Machine

Number 00 in the Wacky Races of 1968-1969, this car is famous for its villainous driver Dick Dastardly and his cunning accomplice, Mutley. Featuring rocket power, cleverly concealed weapons and the ability to fly, this car provided everything its drivers needed to jeopardise the races. Yet despite this, the devious duo usually failed miserably.


Playdays Bus

This colourful bus with a big smiley face opened each episode of Playdays by dropping its passengers off at a different stop every day of the week. Different characters greeted the viewer and educational delights followed, with a nursery rhyme used to end the programme.



FAB1

FAB1 is a pink, six-wheeled Rolls Royce, owned by the impeccable Lady Penelope Creighton-Ward and piloted by her trusty man-servant, Parker. Despite not having her own ‘Thunderbird’, the London agent for International Rescue has been well-equipped for her missions, which have been broadcast since 1965: the car boasts machine guns in the grill, bullet-proof glass, water-skis and radar-assisted steering.


Fireman Sam’s Fire Engine

Fireman Sam has been dousing blazes and rescuing his fellow Welshmen since 1985, and ‘the hero next door’ would be lost without his fire truck. Perhaps that’s why he keeps his engine, based on a 1974 Bedford TK and dubbed Jupiter, so ‘bright and clean’, as the theme tune informs us.



The Mystery Machine

This psychedelic vehicle, complete with flower power-imagery, was based on a 1968 Chevrolet Sport Van and from 1969 onwards performed the crucial task of transporting Scooby-Doo, Shaggy, Velma, Daphe and Fred from one mystery to another. Who knows, they may never have solved anything without it…


Herbie

Herbie was a 1963 Volkswagen Beetle that starred in several Disney films, the first of which screened in 1969. He could drive himself and took part in a number of racing competitions. As he passed from owner to owner, Herbie became embroiled in all sorts of ordeals and adventures, as well as the odd bit of mischief.

[summary] => Ever think about the iconic cars that played a part in your childhood? Here are ten of our favourites. Cue severe onset of nostalgia. [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>


Ever think about the iconic cars that played a part in your childhood? Here are ten of our favourites. Cue severe onset of nostalgia.



Postman Pat’s post van

As the lyrics to the theme tune so aptly state, ‘Everybody knows his bright red van’. Having graced our screens since 1981, Postman Pat and his trusty companion Jess are familiar characters, and the little red post van no less so. It often stars in episodes, whether because a magpie has stolen the keys, a hen has laid an egg inside or it gets stuck in mud.



Brum

This little yellow car first appeared in 1991 and entertained many with his adventures across the city of Birmingham. The half-scale replica of a late 1920s Austin 7 never spoke, but communicated by opening and closing doors, bobbing up and down on his suspension, flashing his headlights and beeping his horn. A car close to our hearts after he narrowly avoids being scrapped in the first series.





The Flintstones

As with all of their technology, the Flintstones’ car was ingeniously fashioned out of prehistoric materials. The stone, wood and animal skin creation was powered by the feet of its passengers, and could move surprisingly fast when necessary. Since 1960, this vehicle has taken the meaning of ‘classic car’ to a new level.



Noddy’s Taxi

Toyland’s most infamous resident would be incomplete without his vehicle; even the theme tune introduces Noddy as ‘the little man with the red and yellow car’. Based on the books written by Enid Blyton, this little car has been whizzing around our screens since 1955, providing a taxi service for the residents of Toytown. Noddy’s driving is arguably a little haphazard, but he’s much-loved all the same.



The Mean Machine

Number 00 in the Wacky Races of 1968-1969, this car is famous for its villainous driver Dick Dastardly and his cunning accomplice, Mutley. Featuring rocket power, cleverly concealed weapons and the ability to fly, this car provided everything its drivers needed to jeopardise the races. Yet despite this, the devious duo usually failed miserably.



Playdays Bus

This colourful bus with a big smiley face opened each episode of Playdays by dropping its passengers off at a different stop every day of the week. Different characters greeted the viewer and educational delights followed, with a nursery rhyme used to end the programme.





FAB1

FAB1 is a pink, six-wheeled Rolls Royce, owned by the impeccable Lady Penelope Creighton-Ward and piloted by her trusty man-servant, Parker. Despite not having her own ‘Thunderbird’, the London agent for International Rescue has been well-equipped for her missions, which have been broadcast since 1965: the car boasts machine guns in the grill, bullet-proof glass, water-skis and radar-assisted steering.



Fireman Sam’s Fire Engine

Fireman Sam has been dousing blazes and rescuing his fellow Welshmen since 1985, and ‘the hero next door’ would be lost without his fire truck. Perhaps that’s why he keeps his engine, based on a 1974 Bedford TK and dubbed Jupiter, so ‘bright and clean’, as the theme tune informs us.





The Mystery Machine

This psychedelic vehicle, complete with flower power-imagery, was based on a 1968 Chevrolet Sport Van and from 1969 onwards performed the crucial task of transporting Scooby-Doo, Shaggy, Velma, Daphe and Fred from one mystery to another. Who knows, they may never have solved anything without it…



Herbie

Herbie was a 1963 Volkswagen Beetle that starred in several Disney films, the first of which screened in 1969. He could drive himself and took part in a number of racing competitions. As he passed from owner to owner, Herbie became embroiled in all sorts of ordeals and adventures, as well as the odd bit of mischief.

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Ever think about the iconic cars that played a part in your childhood? Here are ten of our favourites. Cue severe onset of nostalgia.

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Ever think about the iconic cars that played a part in your childhood? Here are ten of our favourites. Cue severe onset of nostalgia.


Postman Pat’s post van

As the lyrics to the theme tune so aptly state, ‘Everybody knows his bright red van’. Having graced our screens since 1981, Postman Pat and his trusty companion Jess are familiar characters, and the little red post van no less so. It often stars in episodes, whether because a magpie has stolen the keys, a hen has laid an egg inside or it gets stuck in mud.


Brum

This little yellow car first appeared in 1991 and entertained many with his adventures across the city of Birmingham. The half-scale replica of a late 1920s Austin 7 never spoke, but communicated by opening and closing doors, bobbing up and down on his suspension, flashing his headlights and beeping his horn. A car close to our hearts after he narrowly avoids being scrapped in the first series.



The Flintstones

As with all of their technology, the Flintstones’ car was ingeniously fashioned out of prehistoric materials. The stone, wood and animal skin creation was powered by the feet of its passengers, and could move surprisingly fast when necessary. Since 1960, this vehicle has taken the meaning of ‘classic car’ to a new level.


Noddy’s Taxi

Toyland’s most infamous resident would be incomplete without his vehicle; even the theme tune introduces Noddy as ‘the little man with the red and yellow car’. Based on the books written by Enid Blyton, this little car has been whizzing around our screens since 1955, providing a taxi service for the residents of Toytown. Noddy’s driving is arguably a little haphazard, but he’s much-loved all the same.


The Mean Machine

Number 00 in the Wacky Races of 1968-1969, this car is famous for its villainous driver Dick Dastardly and his cunning accomplice, Mutley. Featuring rocket power, cleverly concealed weapons and the ability to fly, this car provided everything its drivers needed to jeopardise the races. Yet despite this, the devious duo usually failed miserably.


Playdays Bus

This colourful bus with a big smiley face opened each episode of Playdays by dropping its passengers off at a different stop every day of the week. Different characters greeted the viewer and educational delights followed, with a nursery rhyme used to end the programme.



FAB1

FAB1 is a pink, six-wheeled Rolls Royce, owned by the impeccable Lady Penelope Creighton-Ward and piloted by her trusty man-servant, Parker. Despite not having her own ‘Thunderbird’, the London agent for International Rescue has been well-equipped for her missions, which have been broadcast since 1965: the car boasts machine guns in the grill, bullet-proof glass, water-skis and radar-assisted steering.


Fireman Sam’s Fire Engine

Fireman Sam has been dousing blazes and rescuing his fellow Welshmen since 1985, and ‘the hero next door’ would be lost without his fire truck. Perhaps that’s why he keeps his engine, based on a 1974 Bedford TK and dubbed Jupiter, so ‘bright and clean’, as the theme tune informs us.



The Mystery Machine

This psychedelic vehicle, complete with flower power-imagery, was based on a 1968 Chevrolet Sport Van and from 1969 onwards performed the crucial task of transporting Scooby-Doo, Shaggy, Velma, Daphe and Fred from one mystery to another. Who knows, they may never have solved anything without it…


Herbie

Herbie was a 1963 Volkswagen Beetle that starred in several Disney films, the first of which screened in 1969. He could drive himself and took part in a number of racing competitions. As he passed from owner to owner, Herbie became embroiled in all sorts of ordeals and adventures, as well as the odd bit of mischief.

[summary] => Ever think about the iconic cars that played a part in your childhood? Here are ten of our favourites. Cue severe onset of nostalgia. [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>


Ever think about the iconic cars that played a part in your childhood? Here are ten of our favourites. Cue severe onset of nostalgia.



Postman Pat’s post van

As the lyrics to the theme tune so aptly state, ‘Everybody knows his bright red van’. Having graced our screens since 1981, Postman Pat and his trusty companion Jess are familiar characters, and the little red post van no less so. It often stars in episodes, whether because a magpie has stolen the keys, a hen has laid an egg inside or it gets stuck in mud.



Brum

This little yellow car first appeared in 1991 and entertained many with his adventures across the city of Birmingham. The half-scale replica of a late 1920s Austin 7 never spoke, but communicated by opening and closing doors, bobbing up and down on his suspension, flashing his headlights and beeping his horn. A car close to our hearts after he narrowly avoids being scrapped in the first series.





The Flintstones

As with all of their technology, the Flintstones’ car was ingeniously fashioned out of prehistoric materials. The stone, wood and animal skin creation was powered by the feet of its passengers, and could move surprisingly fast when necessary. Since 1960, this vehicle has taken the meaning of ‘classic car’ to a new level.



Noddy’s Taxi

Toyland’s most infamous resident would be incomplete without his vehicle; even the theme tune introduces Noddy as ‘the little man with the red and yellow car’. Based on the books written by Enid Blyton, this little car has been whizzing around our screens since 1955, providing a taxi service for the residents of Toytown. Noddy’s driving is arguably a little haphazard, but he’s much-loved all the same.



The Mean Machine

Number 00 in the Wacky Races of 1968-1969, this car is famous for its villainous driver Dick Dastardly and his cunning accomplice, Mutley. Featuring rocket power, cleverly concealed weapons and the ability to fly, this car provided everything its drivers needed to jeopardise the races. Yet despite this, the devious duo usually failed miserably.



Playdays Bus

This colourful bus with a big smiley face opened each episode of Playdays by dropping its passengers off at a different stop every day of the week. Different characters greeted the viewer and educational delights followed, with a nursery rhyme used to end the programme.





FAB1

FAB1 is a pink, six-wheeled Rolls Royce, owned by the impeccable Lady Penelope Creighton-Ward and piloted by her trusty man-servant, Parker. Despite not having her own ‘Thunderbird’, the London agent for International Rescue has been well-equipped for her missions, which have been broadcast since 1965: the car boasts machine guns in the grill, bullet-proof glass, water-skis and radar-assisted steering.



Fireman Sam’s Fire Engine

Fireman Sam has been dousing blazes and rescuing his fellow Welshmen since 1985, and ‘the hero next door’ would be lost without his fire truck. Perhaps that’s why he keeps his engine, based on a 1974 Bedford TK and dubbed Jupiter, so ‘bright and clean’, as the theme tune informs us.





The Mystery Machine

This psychedelic vehicle, complete with flower power-imagery, was based on a 1968 Chevrolet Sport Van and from 1969 onwards performed the crucial task of transporting Scooby-Doo, Shaggy, Velma, Daphe and Fred from one mystery to another. Who knows, they may never have solved anything without it…



Herbie

Herbie was a 1963 Volkswagen Beetle that starred in several Disney films, the first of which screened in 1969. He could drive himself and took part in a number of racing competitions. As he passed from owner to owner, Herbie became embroiled in all sorts of ordeals and adventures, as well as the odd bit of mischief.

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Ever think about the iconic cars that played a part in your childhood? Here are ten of our favourites. Cue severe onset of nostalgia.

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Ever think about the iconic cars that played a part in your childhood? Here are ten of our favourites. Cue severe onset of nostalgia.

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Ever think about the iconic cars that played a part in your childhood? Here are ten of our favourites. Cue severe onset of nostalgia.


Postman Pat’s post van

As the lyrics to the theme tune so aptly state, ‘Everybody knows his bright red van’. Having graced our screens since 1981, Postman Pat and his trusty companion Jess are familiar characters, and the little red post van no less so. It often stars in episodes, whether because a magpie has stolen the keys, a hen has laid an egg inside or it gets stuck in mud.


Brum

This little yellow car first appeared in 1991 and entertained many with his adventures across the city of Birmingham. The half-scale replica of a late 1920s Austin 7 never spoke, but communicated by opening and closing doors, bobbing up and down on his suspension, flashing his headlights and beeping his horn. A car close to our hearts after he narrowly avoids being scrapped in the first series.



The Flintstones

As with all of their technology, the Flintstones’ car was ingeniously fashioned out of prehistoric materials. The stone, wood and animal skin creation was powered by the feet of its passengers, and could move surprisingly fast when necessary. Since 1960, this vehicle has taken the meaning of ‘classic car’ to a new level.


Noddy’s Taxi

Toyland’s most infamous resident would be incomplete without his vehicle; even the theme tune introduces Noddy as ‘the little man with the red and yellow car’. Based on the books written by Enid Blyton, this little car has been whizzing around our screens since 1955, providing a taxi service for the residents of Toytown. Noddy’s driving is arguably a little haphazard, but he’s much-loved all the same.


The Mean Machine

Number 00 in the Wacky Races of 1968-1969, this car is famous for its villainous driver Dick Dastardly and his cunning accomplice, Mutley. Featuring rocket power, cleverly concealed weapons and the ability to fly, this car provided everything its drivers needed to jeopardise the races. Yet despite this, the devious duo usually failed miserably.


Playdays Bus

This colourful bus with a big smiley face opened each episode of Playdays by dropping its passengers off at a different stop every day of the week. Different characters greeted the viewer and educational delights followed, with a nursery rhyme used to end the programme.



FAB1

FAB1 is a pink, six-wheeled Rolls Royce, owned by the impeccable Lady Penelope Creighton-Ward and piloted by her trusty man-servant, Parker. Despite not having her own ‘Thunderbird’, the London agent for International Rescue has been well-equipped for her missions, which have been broadcast since 1965: the car boasts machine guns in the grill, bullet-proof glass, water-skis and radar-assisted steering.


Fireman Sam’s Fire Engine

Fireman Sam has been dousing blazes and rescuing his fellow Welshmen since 1985, and ‘the hero next door’ would be lost without his fire truck. Perhaps that’s why he keeps his engine, based on a 1974 Bedford TK and dubbed Jupiter, so ‘bright and clean’, as the theme tune informs us.



The Mystery Machine

This psychedelic vehicle, complete with flower power-imagery, was based on a 1968 Chevrolet Sport Van and from 1969 onwards performed the crucial task of transporting Scooby-Doo, Shaggy, Velma, Daphe and Fred from one mystery to another. Who knows, they may never have solved anything without it…


Herbie

Herbie was a 1963 Volkswagen Beetle that starred in several Disney films, the first of which screened in 1969. He could drive himself and took part in a number of racing competitions. As he passed from owner to owner, Herbie became embroiled in all sorts of ordeals and adventures, as well as the odd bit of mischief.

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Ever think about the iconic cars that played a part in your childhood? Here are ten of our favourites. Cue severe onset of nostalgia.



Postman Pat’s post van

As the lyrics to the theme tune so aptly state, ‘Everybody knows his bright red van’. Having graced our screens since 1981, Postman Pat and his trusty companion Jess are familiar characters, and the little red post van no less so. It often stars in episodes, whether because a magpie has stolen the keys, a hen has laid an egg inside or it gets stuck in mud.



Brum

This little yellow car first appeared in 1991 and entertained many with his adventures across the city of Birmingham. The half-scale replica of a late 1920s Austin 7 never spoke, but communicated by opening and closing doors, bobbing up and down on his suspension, flashing his headlights and beeping his horn. A car close to our hearts after he narrowly avoids being scrapped in the first series.





The Flintstones

As with all of their technology, the Flintstones’ car was ingeniously fashioned out of prehistoric materials. The stone, wood and animal skin creation was powered by the feet of its passengers, and could move surprisingly fast when necessary. Since 1960, this vehicle has taken the meaning of ‘classic car’ to a new level.



Noddy’s Taxi

Toyland’s most infamous resident would be incomplete without his vehicle; even the theme tune introduces Noddy as ‘the little man with the red and yellow car’. Based on the books written by Enid Blyton, this little car has been whizzing around our screens since 1955, providing a taxi service for the residents of Toytown. Noddy’s driving is arguably a little haphazard, but he’s much-loved all the same.



The Mean Machine

Number 00 in the Wacky Races of 1968-1969, this car is famous for its villainous driver Dick Dastardly and his cunning accomplice, Mutley. Featuring rocket power, cleverly concealed weapons and the ability to fly, this car provided everything its drivers needed to jeopardise the races. Yet despite this, the devious duo usually failed miserably.



Playdays Bus

This colourful bus with a big smiley face opened each episode of Playdays by dropping its passengers off at a different stop every day of the week. Different characters greeted the viewer and educational delights followed, with a nursery rhyme used to end the programme.





FAB1

FAB1 is a pink, six-wheeled Rolls Royce, owned by the impeccable Lady Penelope Creighton-Ward and piloted by her trusty man-servant, Parker. Despite not having her own ‘Thunderbird’, the London agent for International Rescue has been well-equipped for her missions, which have been broadcast since 1965: the car boasts machine guns in the grill, bullet-proof glass, water-skis and radar-assisted steering.



Fireman Sam’s Fire Engine

Fireman Sam has been dousing blazes and rescuing his fellow Welshmen since 1985, and ‘the hero next door’ would be lost without his fire truck. Perhaps that’s why he keeps his engine, based on a 1974 Bedford TK and dubbed Jupiter, so ‘bright and clean’, as the theme tune informs us.





The Mystery Machine

This psychedelic vehicle, complete with flower power-imagery, was based on a 1968 Chevrolet Sport Van and from 1969 onwards performed the crucial task of transporting Scooby-Doo, Shaggy, Velma, Daphe and Fred from one mystery to another. Who knows, they may never have solved anything without it…



Herbie

Herbie was a 1963 Volkswagen Beetle that starred in several Disney films, the first of which screened in 1969. He could drive himself and took part in a number of racing competitions. As he passed from owner to owner, Herbie became embroiled in all sorts of ordeals and adventures, as well as the odd bit of mischief.

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Ever think about the iconic cars that played a part in your childhood? Here are ten of our favourites. Cue severe onset of nostalgia.

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May
10

Deaf Awareness Week

By admin

Charities

Get Deaf Aware this week ...

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May 6th-12th is Deaf Awareness week, during which time charities all over the UK are encouraging us to think about what this means for people across the nation.

If you don’t suffer from hearing loss, sit and listen for a moment. How many different sounds can you make out, all at once? Amazing.

The reality for over 10 million people in the UK, however, is that they are unable to fully experience this. Damage to the ear – which could be caused by anything from genetics, birth complications, diseases and injuries, to blockages and exposure to loud noises – can result in hearing loss; a full or partial decrease in the ability to distinguish sounds.

The degree of deafness can vary: a person may find it difficult to listen to one person speaking amongst a group for example, or they could be completely deaf. Whatever the case, communication and everyday experiences such as listening to music or using the telephone can be hugely difficult. And, contrary to popular belief, not every deaf or hard-of-hearing person can use a sign language or lip-read in order to overcome these barriers.

This Deaf Awareness week, initiatives all over the country are urging people to experience different things from the point of view of a deaf person. Workshops will help school children to explore music by feeling vibrations, learning lyrics in sign languages and watching expression through dance. MPs will be offered training courses on how to communicate better with deaf people, and charities like Action on Hearing Loss are encouraging people to communicate without words or hold sponsored silences. All of this is designed to help people understand the difficulties faced when struggling with hearing loss, dispelling myths and highlighting the positive outcomes that can come from experiencing the world through other senses.

Many, although by no means all, people suffering hearing loss communicate through sign languages. These languages are just like their spoken counter-parts: there are different ones in every community, they use grammar and vocabulary in the same way and have the same linguistic properties. In order to get deaf aware, our challenge to you today is to learn the alphabet in British Sign Language. Use the image below to learn the movements, then try signing with those around you. Good luck!

And remember – you can always get involved by donating your car to one of the many fantastic charities in the UK that supports people with hearing loss.

[summary] => Get Deaf Aware this week [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>

May 6th-12th is Deaf Awareness week, during which time charities all over the UK are encouraging us to think about what this means for people across the nation.

If you don’t suffer from hearing loss, sit and listen for a moment. How many different sounds can you make out, all at once? Amazing.

The reality for over 10 million people in the UK, however, is that they are unable to fully experience this. Damage to the ear – which could be caused by anything from genetics, birth complications, diseases and injuries, to blockages and exposure to loud noises – can result in hearing loss; a full or partial decrease in the ability to distinguish sounds.

The degree of deafness can vary: a person may find it difficult to listen to one person speaking amongst a group for example, or they could be completely deaf. Whatever the case, communication and everyday experiences such as listening to music or using the telephone can be hugely difficult. And, contrary to popular belief, not every deaf or hard-of-hearing person can use a sign language or lip-read in order to overcome these barriers.

This Deaf Awareness week, initiatives all over the country are urging people to experience different things from the point of view of a deaf person. Workshops will help school children to explore music by feeling vibrations, learning lyrics in sign languages and watching expression through dance. MPs will be offered training courses on how to communicate better with deaf people, and charities like Action on Hearing Loss are encouraging people to communicate without words or hold sponsored silences. All of this is designed to help people understand the difficulties faced when struggling with hearing loss, dispelling myths and highlighting the positive outcomes that can come from experiencing the world through other senses.

Many, although by no means all, people suffering hearing loss communicate through sign languages. These languages are just like their spoken counter-parts: there are different ones in every community, they use grammar and vocabulary in the same way and have the same linguistic properties. In order to get deaf aware, our challenge to you today is to learn the alphabet in British Sign Language. Use the image below to learn the movements, then try signing with those around you. Good luck!

And remember – you can always get involved by donating your car to one of the many fantastic charities in the UK that supports people with hearing loss.

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Get Deaf Aware this week

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May 6th-12th is Deaf Awareness week, during which time charities all over the UK are encouraging us to think about what this means for people across the nation.

If you don’t suffer from hearing loss, sit and listen for a moment. How many different sounds can you make out, all at once? Amazing.

The reality for over 10 million people in the UK, however, is that they are unable to fully experience this. Damage to the ear – which could be caused by anything from genetics, birth complications, diseases and injuries, to blockages and exposure to loud noises – can result in hearing loss; a full or partial decrease in the ability to distinguish sounds.

The degree of deafness can vary: a person may find it difficult to listen to one person speaking amongst a group for example, or they could be completely deaf. Whatever the case, communication and everyday experiences such as listening to music or using the telephone can be hugely difficult. And, contrary to popular belief, not every deaf or hard-of-hearing person can use a sign language or lip-read in order to overcome these barriers.

This Deaf Awareness week, initiatives all over the country are urging people to experience different things from the point of view of a deaf person. Workshops will help school children to explore music by feeling vibrations, learning lyrics in sign languages and watching expression through dance. MPs will be offered training courses on how to communicate better with deaf people, and charities like Action on Hearing Loss are encouraging people to communicate without words or hold sponsored silences. All of this is designed to help people understand the difficulties faced when struggling with hearing loss, dispelling myths and highlighting the positive outcomes that can come from experiencing the world through other senses.

Many, although by no means all, people suffering hearing loss communicate through sign languages. These languages are just like their spoken counter-parts: there are different ones in every community, they use grammar and vocabulary in the same way and have the same linguistic properties. In order to get deaf aware, our challenge to you today is to learn the alphabet in British Sign Language. Use the image below to learn the movements, then try signing with those around you. Good luck!

And remember – you can always get involved by donating your car to one of the many fantastic charities in the UK that supports people with hearing loss.

[summary] => Get Deaf Aware this week [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>

May 6th-12th is Deaf Awareness week, during which time charities all over the UK are encouraging us to think about what this means for people across the nation.

If you don’t suffer from hearing loss, sit and listen for a moment. How many different sounds can you make out, all at once? Amazing.

The reality for over 10 million people in the UK, however, is that they are unable to fully experience this. Damage to the ear – which could be caused by anything from genetics, birth complications, diseases and injuries, to blockages and exposure to loud noises – can result in hearing loss; a full or partial decrease in the ability to distinguish sounds.

The degree of deafness can vary: a person may find it difficult to listen to one person speaking amongst a group for example, or they could be completely deaf. Whatever the case, communication and everyday experiences such as listening to music or using the telephone can be hugely difficult. And, contrary to popular belief, not every deaf or hard-of-hearing person can use a sign language or lip-read in order to overcome these barriers.

This Deaf Awareness week, initiatives all over the country are urging people to experience different things from the point of view of a deaf person. Workshops will help school children to explore music by feeling vibrations, learning lyrics in sign languages and watching expression through dance. MPs will be offered training courses on how to communicate better with deaf people, and charities like Action on Hearing Loss are encouraging people to communicate without words or hold sponsored silences. All of this is designed to help people understand the difficulties faced when struggling with hearing loss, dispelling myths and highlighting the positive outcomes that can come from experiencing the world through other senses.

Many, although by no means all, people suffering hearing loss communicate through sign languages. These languages are just like their spoken counter-parts: there are different ones in every community, they use grammar and vocabulary in the same way and have the same linguistic properties. In order to get deaf aware, our challenge to you today is to learn the alphabet in British Sign Language. Use the image below to learn the movements, then try signing with those around you. Good luck!

And remember – you can always get involved by donating your car to one of the many fantastic charities in the UK that supports people with hearing loss.

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Get Deaf Aware this week

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Get Deaf Aware this week

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May 6th-12th is Deaf Awareness week, during which time charities all over the UK are encouraging us to think about what this means for people across the nation.

If you don’t suffer from hearing loss, sit and listen for a moment. How many different sounds can you make out, all at once? Amazing.

The reality for over 10 million people in the UK, however, is that they are unable to fully experience this. Damage to the ear – which could be caused by anything from genetics, birth complications, diseases and injuries, to blockages and exposure to loud noises – can result in hearing loss; a full or partial decrease in the ability to distinguish sounds.

The degree of deafness can vary: a person may find it difficult to listen to one person speaking amongst a group for example, or they could be completely deaf. Whatever the case, communication and everyday experiences such as listening to music or using the telephone can be hugely difficult. And, contrary to popular belief, not every deaf or hard-of-hearing person can use a sign language or lip-read in order to overcome these barriers.

This Deaf Awareness week, initiatives all over the country are urging people to experience different things from the point of view of a deaf person. Workshops will help school children to explore music by feeling vibrations, learning lyrics in sign languages and watching expression through dance. MPs will be offered training courses on how to communicate better with deaf people, and charities like Action on Hearing Loss are encouraging people to communicate without words or hold sponsored silences. All of this is designed to help people understand the difficulties faced when struggling with hearing loss, dispelling myths and highlighting the positive outcomes that can come from experiencing the world through other senses.

Many, although by no means all, people suffering hearing loss communicate through sign languages. These languages are just like their spoken counter-parts: there are different ones in every community, they use grammar and vocabulary in the same way and have the same linguistic properties. In order to get deaf aware, our challenge to you today is to learn the alphabet in British Sign Language. Use the image below to learn the movements, then try signing with those around you. Good luck!

And remember – you can always get involved by donating your car to one of the many fantastic charities in the UK that supports people with hearing loss.

[summary] => Get Deaf Aware this week [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>

May 6th-12th is Deaf Awareness week, during which time charities all over the UK are encouraging us to think about what this means for people across the nation.

If you don’t suffer from hearing loss, sit and listen for a moment. How many different sounds can you make out, all at once? Amazing.

The reality for over 10 million people in the UK, however, is that they are unable to fully experience this. Damage to the ear – which could be caused by anything from genetics, birth complications, diseases and injuries, to blockages and exposure to loud noises – can result in hearing loss; a full or partial decrease in the ability to distinguish sounds.

The degree of deafness can vary: a person may find it difficult to listen to one person speaking amongst a group for example, or they could be completely deaf. Whatever the case, communication and everyday experiences such as listening to music or using the telephone can be hugely difficult. And, contrary to popular belief, not every deaf or hard-of-hearing person can use a sign language or lip-read in order to overcome these barriers.

This Deaf Awareness week, initiatives all over the country are urging people to experience different things from the point of view of a deaf person. Workshops will help school children to explore music by feeling vibrations, learning lyrics in sign languages and watching expression through dance. MPs will be offered training courses on how to communicate better with deaf people, and charities like Action on Hearing Loss are encouraging people to communicate without words or hold sponsored silences. All of this is designed to help people understand the difficulties faced when struggling with hearing loss, dispelling myths and highlighting the positive outcomes that can come from experiencing the world through other senses.

Many, although by no means all, people suffering hearing loss communicate through sign languages. These languages are just like their spoken counter-parts: there are different ones in every community, they use grammar and vocabulary in the same way and have the same linguistic properties. In order to get deaf aware, our challenge to you today is to learn the alphabet in British Sign Language. Use the image below to learn the movements, then try signing with those around you. Good luck!

And remember – you can always get involved by donating your car to one of the many fantastic charities in the UK that supports people with hearing loss.

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Get Deaf Aware this week

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